NEWS RELEASE: Pace Joins with Other Science Coalition Universities, Columbia and NYU, to Honor Lowey

Pace joined with fellow Science Coalition universities Columbia and NYU to honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey for her role in supporting issues related to global health and biomedical research, consistently advocating for robust federal support for targeted research initiatives. (Left: Dr. Jonathan H. Hill, Associate Dean, Pace University, Sean Solomon, Director of Lamont-Doherty, Congresswoma Nit Lowey and Dr. Kurt Becker, Associate Provost for Research, New York University.)

The Science Coalition presented Congresswoman Nita Lowey with its Champion of Science Award in recognition of her strong commitment to funding the basic research that keeps the United States and the state of New York at the forefront of scientific and medical discovery and technological innovation. The award was presented jointly by officials from three Science Coalition universities, Columbia, NYU, and Pace, at an event at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York.

“I would like to thank Congresswoman Lowey for her leadership and ongoing support in Congress, in particular in the area of higher education research funding, she is a true Champion of Science,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “Without her voice it would be a challenge for Pace students, who represent the great middle class of American education and the aspiring heart of America, to assume leadership roles that are essential to creating jobs, stimulating the economy and keeping America competitive.”

Read the full press release here.

NEWS ADVISORY: “Who Ya Gonna Call? — The Uncertain Landscape of Cybersecurity Law and Policy”

Tim Clancy, President of Arch Street LLC, will give an “inside the Beltway” perspective on cybersecurity law and policy issues on Wednesday, November 13 at Pace University’s Lower Manhattan campus, One Pace Plaza, 2nd Floor, Lecture Hall West, noon to 1:20 p.m.

Note: Members of the media must RSVP to attend.  Email wcaldwell@pace.edu

MEDIA ADVISORY

Pace University lecture: “Who Ya Gonna Call? — The Uncertain Landscape of Cybersecurity Law and Policy”

New York, NY — November 6, 2013 — Tim Clancy, President of Arch Street LLC, will give an “inside the Beltway” perspective on cybersecurity law and policy issues on Wednesday, November 13 at Pace University’s Lower Manhattan campus, east of City Hall and six blocks from Wall Street, at One Pace Plaza, 2nd Floor, Lecture Hall West, noon to 1:20 p.m. The event is sponsored by Pace’s Office of Government and Community Relations and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Clancy has broad experience in federal science and technology policy in academia, government and the private sector. He represented the National Science Foundation before Congress, serving in senior positions in the NSF Office of Legislative and Public Affairs. He also served two tours as a professional staff member on the House Science Committee and as Chief of Staff to Representative Sherwood Boehlert in the House of Representatives. He has won federal sponsored research awards as a research faculty member at George Mason University. He has received two awards from the National Science Foundation and the Department of Homeland Security in the fields of cybersecurity law, policy and economics research and has organized and presented at major international conferences on cybersecurity.

Clancy currently conducts research as part of an NSF-funded Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace project in collaboration with the George Mason University Center for the Study of Neuroeconomics led by Dr. Kevin McCabe. Clancy has far-reaching policy expertise having directed major Committee hearings in cybersecurity and academic research and helped shepherd major legislation enacted into law. His legislative and policy accomplishments include the Cybersecurity Research and Development Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-305) as well as Title II and Title III of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296).

While on Capitol Hill, Clancy oversaw the establishment of the DHS Science and Technology Directorate and the DHS Cybersecurity Division. He also acted as chief liaison for Congressman Boehlert to the Department of Defense and particularly the United States Air Force Research Laboratory on issues of information technology and cyber security research and development.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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Harvard Business Review (webinar): “After an Attack: Protecting Your Data, Your Customer and Your Reputation”

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was the speaker for a Harvard Business Review webinar on cyberattacks.

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, was the speaker for a Harvard Business Review webinar on cyberattacks.

View the presentation.

Forensic Science Education Blog: “Top 10 Computer Forensics Professors”

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, is on the list of the top 10 computer forensic professors nationwide who have expertise from network security information to cybercrime.

Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, is among the top 10 computer forensic professors nationwide who have expertise from network security information to cybercrime, according to the Forensic Science Education Blog.

CSO: “Researcher argues for open hardware to defend against NSA spying”

. . . James W. Gabberty, a professor of information systems at Pace University, said “no other information security control trumps the importance of regular and comprehensive auditing.”

. . . James W. Gabberty, a professor of information systems at Pace University, said “no other information security control trumps the importance of regular and comprehensive auditing.”

“Moving towards an Internet infrastructure that is 100% auditable by both governments and companies alike makes the most sense since, after all, we live in an era of increasing paranoia exacerbated by highly publicized regular hacking incidents of our most important societal systems,” he said.

Read the story by CSO.

Westchester Magazine: “BIZ BUZZ”

New research at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems has found a way to detect cheating students taking online exams. The U.S. Department of Defense has shown interest in the research as a possible aid in its ongoing battle against computer hacking and cybercrimes.

New research at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems has found a way to detect cheating students taking online exams. The U.S. Department of Defense has shown interest in the research as a possible aid in its ongoing battle against computer hacking and cybercrimes. Through keystroke and stylometry biometrics, a software program that records a person’s typing patterns and linguistic style, the key-logger application can remember the behavior of a test-taker. This helps online instructors determine whether the person taking the exam is the same person enrolled in the class. According to Amar Gupta, dean of Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, the college is introducing keystroke and biometrics in the lab and slowly expanding it to online education.

Westchester Magazine: BIZ BUZZ

University Business: “Cyberattacks on the rise in higher education”

. . . “With government-sponsored attacks, these happen over time, so they have staff who can spend a lot of time working on reconnaissance about different organizations,” says Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace. “Lots of organizations, including universities, don’t often realize how much information they give out on the internet.”

. . . social media and the openness of the internet can be a big problem, says Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University in New York.

“With government-sponsored attacks, these happen over time, so they have staff who can spend a lot of time working on reconnaissance about different organizations,” says Hayes. “Lots of organizations, including universities, don’t often realize how much information they give out on the internet.”

For example, an institution may post an IT job opening on Monster.com or its own website that lists the computer systems, hardware, or software that candidates must know how to use.

“If their post says a candidate needs to be an expert on the IBM 5700, suddenly somebody knows they have an IBM 5700 and they know the vulnerabilities of that system,” Hayes says.

Members of an institution’s IT department may have a LinkedIn profile that lists their employer, position, and the hardware and software at which they are proficient. Also, IT staff may use internet forums to ask industry colleagues for help fixing a computer system. This provides hackers more valuable clues about an institution’s network, Hayes says.

But colleges and universities may not even be aware of the most sophisticated attacks until they are already well underway. Therefore, institutions need IT staff with a new range of “cyberforensic” skills to identify the virtually microscopic changes in a computer network that indicate an infiltration. “It can be something as simple as a couple of lines of code changed in a registry file,” says Hayes. “We’re talking about very, very small changes that traditional security tools do not pick up.”

Read the article in University Business.

TechNewsWorld: “RSA Warns Customers Off Suspected NSA-Tainted Crypto Tools”

Revelations about weaknesses in encryption standards that have long been revered to undermine much of NIST’s research and publications, said Darren Hayes, CIS program chair at Pace University’s Seidenberg School. “Of great concern is that other nations competing with the USA in terms of trade or weaponry have become more educated about deficiencies in how we secure our intellectual property.”

Revelations about weaknesses in encryption standards that have long been revered to undermine much of NIST’s research and publications, said Darren Hayes, CIS program chair at Pace University’s Seidenberg School. “Of great concern is that other nations competing with the USA in terms of trade or weaponry have become more educated about deficiencies in how we secure our intellectual property.”

Read the story by TechNewsWorld.

MarketWatch: “How IPO will change Twitter”

. . . “The layout of the site will change dramatically after the IPO,” says Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City. After Facebook bought photo-filter site Instagram last year and, Twitter responded by acquiring video-sharing service Vine.

. . . “The layout of the site will change dramatically after the IPO,” says Darren R. Hayes, assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York City. After Facebook bought photo-filter site Instagram last year and, Twitter responded by acquiring video-sharing service Vine.

Read the story by MarketWatch.

InformationWeek: “Twitter Prepares IPO, Facebook Pain In Mind”

. . . “The general market conditions are not unfavorable,” said Darren R. Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University. “It may be a good time for Twitter to go public. There doesn’t seem to be too much negative information about the macroeconomic climate.”

. . . Darren R. Hayes, a computer science professor at Pace University in New York and a former investment banker, agreed in a phone interview that Twitter appears to have chosen to go public at the right time.

“The general market conditions are not unfavorable,” he said. “It may be a good time for Twitter to go public. There doesn’t seem to be too much negative information about the macroeconomic climate.”

Hayes suggests a repeat of the Facebook IPO disaster is unlikely. He blames the underwriter rather than the company itself for failing to attract enough support from institutional investors. He also notes that concerns about Facebook’s growth had been raised when GM publicly distanced itself from Facebook advertising (only to return a year later).

Hayes says that a concern among investors in social media companies is that company business models may be vulnerable to being copied. He doesn’t see that as an issue for Twitter in the near term, but he says it’s something to consider for any social media company.

Read the article by InformationWeek.