The Journal News: Japanese Students Tour Hospital

Japanese medical students visiting as part of a Pace University English language program got a tour of Hudson Valley Hospital Center and spoke to one of its top doctors, a native of Japan.

The Northern Westchester blog on The Journal News web site, www.lohud.com, ran a write-up of international students who spent a week with Pace’s English Language Institute and the College of Health Professions and toured local health care facilities.

What follows is a an article from The Journal News about one such tour:

The sound of Japanese has been heard in the hallways of Hudson Valley Hospital Center in Cortlandt.

Japanese medical students visiting as part of a Pace University English language program got a tour of Hudson Valley Hospital Center and spoke to one of its top doctors, a native of Japan.

Nine students from the Pace-Kanawaza University pre-clerkship program visited the Hospital on March 23 and had a 30-minute interview with Dr. Roy Ashikari of the Ashikari Breast Center. Dr. Ashikari, a renowned breast cancer surgeon, came to the United States from Japan more than 50 years ago.

Dr. Ashikari told the students that he has practiced at many major hospitals, but that the day to day medical treatment which is so important to patients goes on at smaller community hospitals like Hudson Valley Hospital Center. He added that he “loves New York” and “there is no where else like it.”

Brian Hickey, Director of the English Language Institute and an advisor to the Kanawaza program, said the one-week program is aimed at improving the students’ medical English and at exposing them to medicine in the United States. Hickey said that the 4th and 5th year medical students are training to work in rural areas of Japan.

Read the rest of the article here.

Forbes: “Multi-generational Households: Surprise, It’s Not Necessarily A Nightmare”

Living with mom and dad, again, isn’t half bad. So shows the latest data from Pew Research Center. Among the three-in-ten of those surveyed, ages 25-34 who’ve had to shuffle back home during the Great Recession, nearly 80 percent of them say things are working out and they are optimistic about their financial future.

A Pew Research analysis of Census Bureau data shows that the share of Americans living in multi-generational family households is the highest it has been since the 1950s, having increased significantly in the past five years,

Adults ages 25-34 are among the most likely to be living in multi-generational households (mostly with their parents). In 2010, 21.6 percent lived this way, up from 15.8 percent in 2000, reports Forbes Contributor Sheryl Nance-Nash, in the article “Multi-generational Households: Surprise, It’s Not Necessarily A Nightmare.” 

While economically returning to the nest has its rewards, it’s not always a smooth transition. What’s the key to making it work?

Be sensitive.

Don’t focus on past conflicts … Generational differences around parenting should be acknowledged. Grandparents and parents may have markedly different viewpoints on child rearing  than their children do. “Honoring these differences should be an active part of the dialogue in the household, especially if there are small children being reared,” says Richard Shadick, PhD, director of the Counseling Center and adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

Mid-Hudson News: Fairview Fire District considers consolidation

A study with the Michaelian Institute of Public Policy and Management at Pace University was commissioned a few years ago and findings to consolidate the Fairview Fire District with one or more other districts or departments will be presented in May or June.

From Mid-Hudson News:

About 55 percent of the property in the Fairview Fire District is tax exempt, and now public input is being gathered to see if the district’s services can be consolidated into other neighboring districts.

“It’s economy of scale; it’s efficiency,” said Virginia Buechele, a Fairview Fire District commissioner.

“We can’t do it anymore. We have a great many seniors and the people can’t take it,” Buechele said. “We have the highest tax rate.”

A study with the Michaelian Institute of Public Policy and Management at Pace University was commissioned a few years ago and findings to consolidate the Fairview Fire District with one or more other districts or departments – City of Poughkeepsie, Arlington Fire District, Hyde Park Fire and Water, Roosevelt Fire District and Staatsburg Fire District will be presented in May or June after the public input is gathered.

Read the rest of the story at MidHudsonNews.

NEWS RELEASE: Ask a Question; Save a Life. Pace University Receives Grant for Online Training of Faculty and Staff in Suicide Prevention

QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is a nationally recognized suicide prevention program designed to educate persons to recognize and respond to the signs of suicidal thinking or behavior. Research has shown that those who ultimately attempt suicide often provide numerous direct or indirect clues as to their intentions. Contact Dr. Richard Shadick at shadick@pace.edu or 212-346-1526 to sign up for online training and learn how you can save a life.

Pace University Receives Grant for Online Training of Faculty and Staff in Suicide Prevention;  Gatekeeper Approach Strengthens “Community Connectedness” to Detect and Treat At-Risk Individuals

 – Suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-24 year olds –

NEW YORK, NY, March 21, 2012 – Pace University’s Counseling Center, New York City campus, has received a one-time, $6,000 mini-grant from the QPR Institute for the implementation of a local online suicide prevention training program.

“Suicide remains the third leading cause of death among the 15-24 year old age group, of which most college students fall within,” said Richard Shadick, Ph.D., Director of Pace’s Counseling Center in New York City and an adjunct Professor of Psychology.Stigma of mental health services can prevent students from getting the attention they need.  Seventy-five percent of students who die by suicide never come for counseling.  While suicide is one of the most preventable forms of death, doing so is quite complex.  Pace will use this grant to train faculty and staff in a simple gatekeeper procedure that follows CPR and can save lives.”

QPR involves these three simple steps:

  • Question … a person about suicide
  • Persuade … the person to get help
  • Refer …the person to the appropriate resource

To date, more than one million Americans have been trained in the QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention program. QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer) is an evidence-based, Suicide Prevention Resource Center/American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (SPRC/AFSP) registered “best practice” program taught in classrooms by more than 5,000 Certified Instructors throughout the U.S. and abroad.

Ask a Question; Save a Life 

“What can be done to help individuals who are suicidal? Knowing the warning signs and symptoms of suicide can help,” advised Dr. Shadick. ”Suicidal individuals can be depressed, hopeless, angry, or socially isolated. They often have difficulty with sleeping or eating and demonstrate obvious changes in their appearance. Students who are suicidal have significant academic or financial problems or experience a significant loss, such as a relationship break up, divorce, or move. Suicidal individuals also talk about dying-either indirectly, such as saying that they want to end their pain or make it all go away, or directly, such as stating that they want to kill themselves. Students whom have attempted to kill themselves in the past are particularly at risk for future suicide death. Finally, with college students a significant proportion of suicides involve drug or alcohol use.”

QPR’s online suicide prevention program “gatekeeper” training takes about an hour.  A gatekeeper is someone who knows the basics about suicide and intervention skills, believes that suicide can be prevented and can assist in the aftermath of suicide.  The three formal goals of the program are:

  • Goal 1: Build community capacity to prevent suicide by strengthening community connectedness through gatekeeper training designed to detect and treat at-risk persons before a suicide attempt or completion occurs.
  • Goal 2: Reduce the frequency and base rates of suicide attempts and completions in communities experiencing increasing and high rates of suicide events (attempts and fatalities).
  • Goal 3: Establish sustainable suicide prevention programming and staff infrastructure at the community level through a public-private partnership. 

If someone is talking about killing themselves or is experiencing some of these symptoms, it is essential to intervene,” added Dr. Shadick.  “One should listen without judgment and acknowledge the pain they are suffering. Even if they downplay their symptoms, one should take them seriously. It is essential to get them to a psychologist quickly. Sometimes a college student may feel that there is a stigma connected to going to a campus counseling center. One should let them know that the counseling center is another form of academic support just like a writing center or tutoring service and that many students go to these centers for a wide variety of concerns, not because they are mentally ill.”

Members of the Pace Community who are interested in participating in the QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention program should contact Dr. Shadick directly at rshadick@pace.edu, 212-346-1526.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172 

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Mid Hudson News: Pace Study of Potential Dutchess Fire Department Consolidation Complete

The results of a study by Pace University exploring the feasibility of consolidation of the Fairview Fire District with five other departments in Dutchess County will be released next week.

From Mid-Hudson News:

The results of a study by Pace University exploring the feasibility of enhancing cooperation or consolidation of services provided by the Fairview Fire District in the towns of Poughkeepsie and Hyde Park with five other departments in Dutchess County will be released next week.

A state grant funded the study conducted by the Michaelian Institute at Pace will not make any recommendations, but rather provide findings, said principal investigator Michael Genito.

Read more here.

The Journal News: Concordia and Pace to Offer ‘Fast Track’

Concordia College has announced a new articulation agreement with the Pace Lubin School of Business, offering students a fast track to earning their master’s degree in accounting.

Concordia College recently announced a new articulation agreement with the Pace Lubin School of Business, offering students a “fast track” to receiving their master’s degree in accounting. Students who graduate from Concordia with a B.S. in business administration, specializing in accounting, will be able to attend Pace and obtain their M.S. in accounting/CPA preparation. Depending on the students’ grades and credits earned, the program could be completed in as few as 32 credits instead of 51.

From lohud.com. Additional information at The Journal News.

 

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University researchers recognized for development of first new drug for “sleeping sickness” in 30 years

There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and Nigel Yarlett, PhD, chair of chemistry and physical sciences in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative Project of the Year 2011 Award given to Pace professors

NEW YORK, NY, March 12, 2012 – There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to biology professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and chemistry professor Nigel Yarlett, PhD, and their undergraduate students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

The professors’ work out of Haskins Laboratories at Pace has been awarded the Project of the Year 2011 Award by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) for their role in the development of the first new drug to go to clinical trial and the first new treatment for sleeping sickness since 1980. The award was given jointly to Scynexis Inc. of Research Triangle Park, NC, which synthesized the compounds, and Pace University which did initial testing in vivo. Several Pace chemistry and biology students assisted in animal testing of the drug, providing them with hands-on experience in drug development from the bench to in vivo studies. Haskins Labs identified 15 compounds that may work in humans.

Bacchi and Yarlett have devoted their careers to neglected diseases. The research of Haskins Labs on compounds to treat sleeping sickness was written about in The New York Times in 1985 and 2008. In one article the disease was called “fearsome but nearly forgotten because its victims are poor and obscure.” In another article one drug, eflornithine, the trademark name for DFMO discovered in 1980 at Pace, is mentioned saying it is a “miracle” the drug is available. The drug is still used as a first line clinical treatment for sleeping sickness.

About 150,000 people contract sleeping sickness each year, but 50 million people in 36 countries live in areas where they are at risk. During recent epidemics in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, and Southern Sudan, prevalence has been as high as 50 percent. In some communities with high prevalence, the death rate from African sleeping sickness has exceeded that of HIV/AIDS. Nevertheless, there is no profit in it. Without outside funding and incentives, drug companies are not interested in developing treatments for such orphan diseases.

 

With funding from DNDi, which receives support from the Gates Foundation, the drug has been able to go to clinical trials.  One quarter of a million dollars a year is going to support this research at Pace.

The researchers have identified a new series of compounds which are effective in curing mice and are now being tested on larger mammals. Phase I clinical toxicity studies are beginning on humans in France on one compound, SCYX7158. Volunteers who are not infected take the drug to see if humans can tolerate it and are monitored closely for side effects. If these studies are successful, this compound will go to Phase II clinical trials later this year in African villages with infected inhabitants who are cut off from most medical access.

“For the people living in these villages, this sort of sickness is just a way of life,” said Yarlett.

“Sleeping sickness” has been called by The New York Times “too benign a nickname” for human African trypanosomiasis, which is caused by a protozoan. The disease is characterized by two distinct stages, early stage or blood stream infection and late stage disease of the central nervous system.  When the brain is affected, victims hallucinate and their behavior becomes erratic and sometimes violent. Victims may chase people with machetes, throw themselves into latrines and scream with pain at the touch of water. Near the end of the disease, they lapse into a state of listlessness followed by coma and death.

The Haskins Laboratories, which have been at Pace since 1970, have a long legacy of researching possible cures for diseases that are out of the public spotlight. “We work on things that aren’t stylish—not in vogue. And consequentially, things that aren’t typically funded to a great extent,” said Yarlett.

“Drugs were developed between 1920 and 1950 to treat sleeping sickness, but some of these drugs had an arsenic base and were toxic,” Yarlett said. “For about 10% of those being treated with these drugs, death occurred more quickly than it would have if they hadn’t been treated. These are the first new drugs developed to treat sleeping sickness in 30 years. We’re very excited.”

Workers at Haskins Labs are also developing a first line of treatment for a more global issue—cryptosporidiosis, a waterborne illness that causes chronic diarrhea. Its major impact has been among those with weakened immune systems, including those who are HIV positive, receiving cancer treatments, or those that have undergone organ transplants.

“Cryptosporidosis is one of the major causes of death in HIV positive people and currently there is nothing available to treat it,” Yarlett said.

Read the press release from DNDi here.

About Haskins Labs

The Haskins Laboratories was founded in 1935 at General Electrical and Union College by four young and innovative scientists, one of whom became its namesake, Caryl Haskins, a physicist and geneticist. In 1970 it split into two divisions, the Microbiology Division, under Seymour Hutner (one of the original scientists) affiliated with Pace University, and the Speech Recognition and Cognition Division affiliated with Yale University. It is funded by a number of sources, including the National Institutes of Health (in collaboration with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas), Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), and Genzyme Corp and works in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies Scynexis and Anacor.

For more information about the work being done at the Haskins Laboratories, click here.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

MO.com: “Live Deliberately”

MO.com – a website for entrepreneurs that stands for Modus Operandi or Method of Operating – interviewed Professor Bruce Bachenheimer about his passion for entrepreneurship, early influences, how he fosters creativity and innovation in his students, mentors, social entrepreneurship, job challenges and his most important piece of advice for those ready to embark on the adventure of starting a business.

MO.com interviews entrepreneurs from all walks, across all industries, and from around the world.  The online publication recently spoke with Pace’s Bruce Bachenheimer and asked him to share his strategies and business philosophies with its readers.  The article is embedded below or read it online where you can vote for Professor Bachenheimer as giving the month’s best interview by clicking here

“Live Deliberately”

Written by MO

Bruce Bachenheimer, Pace University

Director of the Entrepreneurship Lab

http://webpage.pace.edu/bbachenheimer/

Bruce Bachenheimer is a Clinical Professor of Management, the Director of the Entrepreneurship Lab and a Faculty Fellow of the Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Pace University. He teaches undergraduate and graduate courses, primarily in the areas of entrepreneurship, management, and strategy.

Bruce has been widely quoted in a variety of publications, interviewed on radio and television, and has spoken on entrepreneurship at numerous conferences, including the Annual Youth Assembly at the United Nations, the Global Consortium of Entrepreneurship Centers, and the Make Mine a Million $ Business program, where he also served as a judge. Mr. Bachenheimer is a reviewer for the CASE Journal, the founding faculty advisor of the Pace Association for Collegiate Entrepreneurs, a Students In Free Enterprise (SIFE) Sam Walton Fellow, and the organizer of the Pace Business Plan Competition and the Pace Pitch Contest.

Bruce is a member of the Board of Directors and past Chairman of the MIT Enterprise Forum of New York City and has served on the organization’s Global Board. He also serves on the Board of Directors & Advisors of LeadAmerica and has served as a consultant to the NYC Department of Small Business Services and the New York City Economic Development Corp. He founded Annapolis Maritime Corp. and co-founded StockCentral Australia.

Bachenheimer began his career as a Wall Street trader then had the courage to take a step back from the rat race and go sailing … for several years. After sailing through the Caribbean to South America, he headed to Annapolis, Maryland, where he launched a business importing teak lumber and taught himself yacht joinery. Bachenheimer then transitioned to a career in high-tech forensic science, where he served as the International Product Manager for an entrepreneurial venture, conducting business in over 20 countries. Several years later, he received the prestigious McKinsey & Company Leadership Scholarship to pursue and MBA degree, which he earned from the Australian Graduate School of Management. While completing his degree, he co-founded StockCentral Australia, which grew to become one of the largest financial websites in the country. A Pace alumni, Bachenheimer earned a BBA, Summa Cum Laude, from the Lubin School of Business. He was conversational in Japanese and spent a semester at Tsukuba National University in Japan as an undergraduate.

MO: Where does your passion for entrepreneurship come from? Who or what were your early influences or inspirations?

Bruce: I grew up in a somewhat rural area and there were hardly any local businesses where neighborhood kids could find part-time or summer work. Out of necessity, I created my opportunities; building things such as rabbit hutches and photographing neighborhood homes, which I printed, mounted and sold myself. I also did a fair bit of hiking and camping, which instilled a sense of independence and self-reliance. Another early influence was Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, particularly the line “I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.” I later bought a boat and sailed from New England to South America and back to Annapolis, Maryland – I named it Deliberate, which is how I try to live.

MO: How do you foster creativity and innovation in your students? Is creativity something that we’re born with or can it be taught and developed?

Bruce: Some people are certainly born with more creativity than others, but I believe creativity and innovation can be taught and developed. I use a variety of methods to encourage students to think and act more innovatively. Conducting engaging classroom exercises, selecting non-traditional texts, using interesting case studies, bringing in dynamic guest speakers, showing inspirational video clips, incorporating business simulations in the curriculum, assigning challenging projects, and taking students on filed trips or extracurricular activities are some examples. I try to remember something Confucius said: “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

MO: Have you had any mentors during the course of your career?

Bruce: Sure, there were many and I’m grateful to each of them. Instead of a seeking an individual mentor for general career or life advice, I have turned to a variety of mentors for help in specific areas: interviewing, negotiating, presenting, managing, serving on a board, and teaching.

MO: Why do you think that the field social entrepreneurship has recently exploded? Why are people looking for more meaningful ways to carve out a career and how will this trend impact the start-up landscape?

Bruce: There are so many reasons. But in a way, I believe it is just a natural progression for people in an advanced society – a sort of move up Maslow’s hierarchy towards self-actualization. Generally, I think we are increasingly aware of important social issues and have more resources available to address them. Entrepreneurship is really about finding new ways to solve problems and add value, commercially and/or socially. More locally, it appears that the 9/11 terrorist attacks have had a profound and lasting impact on people’s desire to find meaningful careers. I’d recommend David Bornstein’s book ‘How to Change the World’ to better answer the question.

MO: You’re in constant contact with bright, young innovators. What aspects of teaching and mentoring are most inspiring for you? On the flip side, are there any aspects of your job that you find specifically challenging?

Bruce: I really do enjoy working with bright, young, motivated entrepreneurs and innovators. I am inspired by them and honestly believe that nobody learns more that the person standing at the front of the classroom. I don’t only work with my own students, but many throughout Pace and from numerous other universities. I organize the Pace Pitch Contest, which attracts competitors from schools such as NYU, Columbia, Princeton, Harvard, MIT, and Stanford. It’s been great to help teams prepare for the competition and then see them ace their pitch. I’ve kept in contact with many of them and am proud of what they are accomplishing. I have also enjoyed working with young entrepreneurs as a member of the board of the MIT Enterprise Forum of New York City over the past decade and as a mentor at the Kairos Society Global Summit this past year. I guess the biggest challenge is being as critical as I believe is necessary, while not dampening passion or discouraging persistence. But that’s passion and persistence, as opposed to arrogance and stubbornness.

MO: What is the most important piece of advice you have for those looking to start a business?

Bruce: Start by looking for something you’re truly passionate about. If you haven’t found that, don’t start a business – keep looking. There are so many challenges in launching a new venture – requiring so much time, energy, resources, social capital, and emotional commitment – it better be something you really love. Another thing is to find great people – great mentors, great partners, great advisors, and great employees.

 

1010 WINS, CBS New York: “The Bottom Line with New York City Small Business Services Commissioner Robert Walsh”

Pace’s new Entrepreneurship Lab in a New York City minute …
Small Business Services Commissioner Robert W. Walsh spoke about Pace’s new space for sharing new business ideas in his March 7th radio broadcast. Commissioner Walsh attended the E-Lab’s opening reception on February 16.

New York City Small Business Commissioner Robert W. Walsh promoted Pace’s new Entrepreneurship Lab in his “The Bottom Line” radio broadcast on March 7 on 1010 WINS, CBS New York.

Read a transcript of Commissioner Walsh’s remarks below or listen to his words by clicking here.  

I’m Rob Walsh.  One New York City university is helping students get in business.  On today’s Bottom Line.

When you put smart people together in a room, the sparks will fly.

That’s why Pace University in Lower Manhattan is creating the Entrepreneurship Lab – a space for students, faculty, and staff to learn from each other and share new business ideas.

It’s a way for students to get a leg up on the entrepreneurial mindset from day one.

And it’s right next to the Pace Small Business Development Center – so students who cook up good ideas have the resources to make a solid business plan, too.

For more information about the business development programs at Pace, go to www.pace.edu

If you’re a business owner with a question about how the city can help your business, email us at thebottomline@1010winsmail.com.

I’m Rob Walsh, Small Business Services Commissioner, for 1010 WINS.

 

Vegas Seven: “Pact With an Angel”

Rebecca Tekula, PhD, Executive Director of Pace’s Helene & Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship, on whether one of the most recession-damaged cities in the nation can benefit from community stewardship.

Ward 5 in downtown Las Vegas, has been hit hard by foreclosures and has many abandoned homes — the kind of problems that can tear down an entire community.

To kick-start community change, The Partnerships for Community Health (PACT) has given grants to grassroots Vegas groups like Power of One, co-founded by Earnest James (pictured), which mentors at-risk kids in West Las Vegas.  The model is called community stewardship, and both the promise and risk of it is that the impact of the funding will ultimately depend on the grassroots organizations themselves.

“You want to make sure your stakeholders have some say in how you’re spending the money,” says Rebecca Tekula, PhD, executive director for the Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship, which researches and advises nonprofits. “Eventually the full governance will belong to the community,” she told Vegas Seven writer Heidi Kyser.

In other words, whether PACT succeeds in the long run will be up to people such as Earnest James.