NEWS RELEASE: Pace Residence Hall Opens in Lower Manhattan as Part of Revitalization Plan

Pace University officials formally opened the new residence hall for Pace students at 182 Broadway in lower Manhattan on Monday afternoon in a ribbon cutting ceremony. The ribbon cutting was followed by an open house with tours and reception.

182 Broadway Officially Opened in Ribbon Cutting Ceremony

 

NEW YORK – Pace University officials formally opened the new residence hall for Pace students at 182 Broadway in lower Manhattan on Monday afternoon in a ribbon cutting ceremony. The ribbon cutting was followed by an open house with tours and reception.

Pace officials on hand included President Stephen J. Friedman, Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer William J. McGrath, Provost Uday Sukhatme, PhD, and Dean for Students Marijo Russell-O’Grady. President of the Residence Hall Association at Pace’s lower Manhattan campus, Steven Nolte, and Student Government Association President Michael Creneti represented students.

“This new 23-story residence hall provides wonderful housing for 600 students,” said Friedman at the ribbon cutting ceremony. “It is just one of three new buildings in our growing footprint in Lower Manhattan. Earlier this year, we opened a new Performing Arts Center at 140 William, home to Pace Performing Arts, one of our fastest growing programs and one of the best in the nation. And in 2015, we will welcome 700 students to Beekman Tower, another residence hall under construction at the corner of Beekman and William.”

“This new residence hall will be a major enhancement for generations of Pace students who value the experience of living and learning in lower Manhattan,” said McGrath. “We’ve been providing professional leaders and scholarship to the community since we started here 107 years ago, and we intend to be a force in the area’s continuing rebirth.”

The official unveiling followed four years of planning and construction as part of Pace University’s Master Plan to revitalize its campuses in lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY.

The residence hall at 182 Broadway opened its doors this fall to students. Other University residences downtown are at 55 John Street, 106 Fulton Street and in the University’s multi-function building at 1 Pace Plaza, just east of City Hall. Construction recently began on another new residence hall at 33 Beekman Street. The university broke ground last week on a $100M revitalization project for its Pleasantville campus which includes two new residence halls and several other enhancements.

SL Green has conveyed a long-term ground lease condominium interest to Pace for the residence hall portion of the new building at 182 Broadway. Karl Fischer Architect from Montreal, Canada, with offices in New York City, is behind the design of the building. Pace’s real estate interests were represented by David A. Falk of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank; it was represented legally by Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Law School, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

American Express OPEN Forum: Are You a Social Entrepreneur?

Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was mentioned prominently at the beginning of an article on social entrepreneurs on the American Express OPEN Forum.

Pace’s Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship was mentioned prominently at the beginning of an article on social entrepreneurs on the American Express OPEN Forum.

From the article:

“According to the Guardian, there are 40 million people employed in social enterprise models worldwide. Rebecca Tekula, executive director of the Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship of Pace University in New York, says there may be even more. “Many…do not position themselves as ‘social enterprises’ simply because the entrepreneurs do not even consider the alternative of being purely for-profit and ignoring the impact their business makes on society,” she said.”

Read the full article here:

Are You a Social Entrepreneur? : The World :: American Express OPEN Forum.

The Journal News, News 12 and The Daily Pleasantville: Pleasantville’s Pace Gets Solar Classroom

Pace unveiled its new solar classroom, funded by Con Edison, and The Journal News, News 12 and The Daily Pleasantville reported on the event. (Left: Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center at Pace, addresses the crowd at Thursday’s solar panel unveiling. Photo credit: Brian Marschhauser)

Pace unveiled its new solar classroom, thanks in part to a grant from Con Edison, and The Journal News, News 12, The Daily Pleasantville and Patch.com reported on the event.

From The Daily Pleasantville:

Sunny skies aptly shined down on the Pace University campus Thursday afternoon as its Environmental Center celebrated the opening of its new solar-powered classroom.

“Can you feel the electricity being made?” said Angelo Spillo, director of the Environmental Center.

The panels were funded by Con Edison, which awarded Pace with a $15,000 grant as part of its effort to expand solar development in New York. A similar initiative was also signed into action by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday.

“A lot of times we have so much dialogue and you see much going on back and forth as far as solar industry and solar power at this point,” said County Legislator Michael Smith. “A lot of what you read is just the talk. This is the doing, and we need more doing and we need less talk.”

While the solar panels will help the center save money on its electrical bill, Spillo said that was not the motivation behind its installation. The equipment will instead be used as a teaching tool.

“One of the things we wanted to do was keep this equipment visible,” Spillo said. “If you were doing it in a home, you would want to hide it, you would want to put it in the basement, it’s kind of unsightly. In our case, we want our students to see it.”

Helping to design the conversion was William Misicka, a senior student in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Environmental Studies Program at Pace. Misicka performed research on solar energy and went on a solar site survey with a contracting company.

“This is a virus, it’s a good virus, and this is how it spreads. Congratulations to Pace on your accomplishment,” said Smith. “Let the sun shine.”

From The Journal News:

“The university opened its solar classroom – a former cottage that now has solar panels on the roof – this afternoon (Wednesday). Con Edison supported the project as part of its commitment to promoting education and environmental awareness in Westchester County and New York City.

“The solar classroom at Pace University will help us spread our message about the environmental and economic benefits of solar power,” said Frances A. Resheske, Con Edison’s senior vice president for Public Affairs. “The incentives government agencies are offering make this a great time for customers to consider whether they can cut their energy bills by using solar energy.”

The Con Edison grant allowed Pace to add solar panels to a building in its Environmental Center. The panels provide 1.5 kilowatts of electricity to the building.

Hundreds of Pace students and visitors use the classroom each year. The university plans to use the classroom to show that solar power can be a viable alternative to fossil fuels.

William Misicka, a student in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Environmental Studies program, designed the conversion.”

via Carmel student helps Pace get a solar classroom | Northern Westchester.

The Journal News: Sister’s passion in literacy | lohud.com

The Journal News featured Sister St. John Delany and the Center for Literacy Enrichment at Pace in a 2-page profile with photos in print and online.

The Journal News featured Sister St. John Delany and the Center for Literacy Enrichment at Pace in a 2-page profile with photos in print and online.

From The Journal News:

Sister Mary St. John Delany’s life — all 88 years of it — has been an homage to the written word.

Between teaching literacy and children’s literature at Pace University and running reading workshops, she is conducting research on brain chemistry and learning. But most important to Delany is the literacy center she built, helping children overcome reading difficulties, improve their writing and discover a passion for books.

“Literacy has been my whole life,” said Delany, who began her teaching career during World War II. “My legacy, I hope, is a book in every child’s hand.”

At a dinner next week, Pace University will recognize Delany and its Center for Literacy Enrichment, which she founded 40 years ago. Delany is still director of the center, which provides reading and writing assistance to school-age children.

The awards ceremony at the Woman’s Club of White Plains will toast the work of Delany and other honorees, but Delany said the honor has been hers. Indeed, she couldn’t imagine a life other than the one she lived, devoted to literacy and learning.

Delany, a member of the Roman Catholic Sisters of Divine Compassion order, began her career in White Plains in 1944, teaching first grade at St. Bernard’s. The profession was preordained, Delany said, recalling childhood memories of teaching lessons to her younger sister, using a dining room wall as a chalkboard.

Delany worked as a teacher and principal for three decades before joining the faculty at the College of White Plains. The college president asked her to create a program for children who have trouble reading. The center opened its doors in 1972, and the college merged with Pace in 1975.

“The move toward teaching literacy has been a passion of hers for as long as I’ve known her,” said Sandra Flank, professor emeritus at Pace’s school of education.

Flank, a retired math, science and technology professor, first met Delany nearly 40 years ago during the college merger.

“She’s always felt students being able to read comfortably made a huge difference in their lives,” said Flank, 76. “She’s devoted an enormous amount of time and effort to see that happens.”

Patrick Enright, 45, of Harrison enrolled his daughter, Lauren, in the literacy center less than a year ago. Delany’s reputation lured him in, hoping she could help Lauren, 7, overcome some reading difficulties.

Lauren’s lessons have included dissecting larger words into smaller ones and learning to keep her place when reading. Her progress has been slow and steady, but she now reads on grade level, Enright said.

“She learns differently. That’s what we’re adapting to,” he said. “If you can build up (children’s) self-esteem, their sense of self-worth, sense of pride, they want to engage you in reading. They don’t become overwhelmed or give up on it.”

Education has changed since the ’70s, Delany said, pointing to an unhealthy emphasis on standardized testing. That type of rigid, formatted learning doesn’t promote joyful reading and stifles imagination, said Delany, who earned a doctorate from Fordham University.

Ironically, Delany said, those are the keys to combating illiteracy. At the center, which charges $45 an hour and serves about 85 children a week, Delany and her staff of eight tutors teach the basics of memory, reading comprehension and vocabulary during daily sessions and special summer or after-school programs.

But what cements learning are the things thought to be unrelated to reading: building self-esteem, confidence and open-ended imagining.

The lessons focus as much on writing as they do reading, Delany said. Children are encouraged to rewrite the endings of stories and craft essays on specific characters and situations.

The center uses computers, iPads and other forms of technology to teach, but one of Delany’s goals is to block out distractions such as video games, iPhones and other gadgets. For many children, Delany said, she is reintroducing them to books. “We work very hard to get children to perform to their optimal level, and we try to make them feel as confident as we can,” she said.

Ellie Spangler of White Plains said her 8-year-old son, Andrew, has become a much more confident writer in the two months he has studied at the center. Typical one-sentence answers are turning into paragraphs, she said, and his vocabulary is improving.

“He’s putting more effort into his work, he’s beginning to elaborate more,” said Spangler, a stay-at-home mother of three. Writing “is a valuable skill to know and to learn young.”

In addition to teaching, Delany is working with one of her undergraduate students, researching ways to “reorganize” the brain to improve reading.

The research adds to what already are very long workdays. But Delany said she isn’t planning to slow down. That doesn’t surprise those who know her best.

“As she’s said, if she retires, what is she going to do?” Flank said with a chuckle. “You do what matters in this life — and this matters.”

Sister’s passion in literacy | The Journal News | LoHud.com | LoHud.com.

Wall Street Journal: Buying Into Mob Mentality

The Wall Street Journal looked to Ira Davidson, director of the Small Business Development Center at Pace, for insight on cash mobs.

Ira Davidson, director of the Small Business Development Center at Pace, told the Wall Street Journal: “Cash mobs will make a bunch of naïve, starry-eyed liberals have fun and feel good about themselves, and have no economic consequence whatsoever.”

He said, “cash mobs make things worse, because they treat independent shops like charity cases.”

via Buying Into Mob Mentality – WSJ.com.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Opening of First Solar Classroom at Pace University April 19

Pace University’s first solar classroom will officially open April 19 thanks to a $15,000 grant from Con Edison. A ceremony will take place at the site of the newly retrofitted classroom, Pace’s popular Environmental Center, on Thursday, April 19, 2012, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Pace Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Road, entrance 3.

OPENING OF FIRST SOLAR CLASSROOM AT PACE UNIVERSITY APRIL 19

Made possible through Con Edison grant

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 5, 2012 – Pace University’s first solar classroom will officially open April 19 thanks to a $15,000 grant from Con Edison.

A ceremony will take place at the site of the newly retrofitted classroom, Pace’s popular Environmental Center, on Thursday, April 19, 2012, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Pace Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Road, entrance 3.

The funding from Con Edison allowed Pace to convert a building on its Pleasantville campus into a solar powered classroom. Solar panels were added to the roof of the cottage that charge batteries and provide electrical power to the classroom. A Pace student, an Environmental Studies major, designed the conversion.

Around 300-400 Pace students, high school students, and visitors currently use the classroom annually, with more expected in coming years. The classroom will serve as a real-life model that shows solar power as a viable alternative to fossil fuels, complementing environmental science curriculum at Pace.

The building, an historic, renovated cottage, is part of the University’s Environmental Center, a focal point for environmental education on campus, which also draws visitors from across Westchester.

The Environmental Center at Pace was founded in 1971, constructed around the remnants of an old farm. The farmhouse, nearly 250 years old, now houses office and classroom space, a small research library, and the Marty McGuire Museum with animal exhibit spaces used in educational programs.

The Center promotes environmental education and supports academic programs, including the biology and health sciences, environmental studies, the environmental science graduate program, Pace’s School of Education, and the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. The Center is a hub for student projects and community outreach, including annual Earth Month events at Pace.

About Pace University

 For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

 

Crain’s New York Business: Executive Moves, April 2, 2012

Lubin Professor Bruce Bachenheimer’s appointment as Director of Pace’s new entrepreneurship lab continues to make news.

Crain’s New York Business included Professor Bachenheimer’s appointment in this week’s Executive Moves column, along with his photo: 

Pace University:
Bruce Bachenheimer, 50, was promoted to director of the university’s entrepreneurship lab. He will continue as clinical professor of management. He was previously program director of entrepreneurship at the Lubin School of Business.

The Caledonian-Record: “The Path To Normalcy”

A young teacher is murdered by a couple pretending to need help. Her 2-year-old child is left in the car unharmed. Amy Ash Nixon, a reporter from the local St. Johnsbury, Vt newspaper, The Caledonian-Record, turns to Pace’s Dr. Richard Shadick to ask how their community can recover from a horrifying violent crime like this.

The abduction, assault and murder of Melissa Jenkins – a popular teacher at St. Johnsbury Academy – has left the community searching for answers, reports The Caledonian-Record in the article, “The Path To Normalcy.”

Many people have been in both shock and disbelief, a feeling that things like this aren’t supposed to happen here.

Dr. Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University in New York City, offered his insight into the tragedy that has rocked St. Johnsbury and neighboring towns this week in an interview with Reporter/Columnist Amy Ash Nixon.

“How to help the community heal is the question. It really helps for the local government to have a clear plan in mind about the situation or the traumatic event that occurred. We saw a great example of that with 9/11 in New York City with the mayor providing information that was clear and accurate,” said Dr. Shadick. “People tend to heal faster from traumatic events when they know what is going on.”

“Information about trauma should be disseminated to the community. It’s a horrific situation, but that doesn’t mean that everyone is going to submit to a post-traumatic stress disorder, or get depressed or anxious,” he said Friday afternoon. “Most people are resilient when it comes to circumstances like this. So to get information out about the fact that people are resilient and they can take certain steps to heal from this trauma and not become incapacitated by it,” said Dr. Shadick.

On hearing the signs of community support, about the pink balloons and ribbons tied everywhere, Dr. Shadick said, “that can be very healing.”

“Providing information about what is the process for healing is helpful, too. And to provide guidance when healing isn’t going right,” he said. “If someone is having great difficulty eating or sleeping for weeks and weeks on end, if they are feeling depressed or suicidal, these are all signs that help from a mental health professional is indicated.”

“There are different groups of people that may need different things. Children may need to have a different type of intervention, if you will, than adults, and people who knew the victim may need more support, and an opportunity to grieve differently than the rest of the community,” said Dr. Shadick. “Memorials are helpful. Scholarship funds, those kinds of things, fundraising for the family and many people respond very positively to taking an active role in helping the victims, and that can be very healing.

NEWS RELEASE: 10th Annual Earth Month at Pace

April is Earth Month at Pace, and a variety of environmental –related events are
scheduled to promote awareness and action, covering important topics from recycling to conservation to nature lore.

PACE UNIVERSITY’S 10TH ANNUAL EARTH MONTH EVENTS INCLUDE WILDLIFE AND LECTURES ON “HOT” ENVIRONMENTAL TOPICS

Sponsored by Pace’s Environmental Center
and N.A.T.U.R.E. (the Pace student environmental club)

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 2, 2012 – April is Earth Month at Pace, and a variety of environmental –related events are
scheduled to promote awareness and action, covering important topics from recycling to conservation to nature lore.

Events will take place on Pace’s Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Rd.

The following events are scheduled for Earth Month:

Monday, April 2, Earth Charter: University Prof. Nicholas Robinson will speak about the history and significance of
the Earth Charter. Entrance 2, Lienhard Hall room 20, 10:00am  11:00am.

Wednesday, April 4 “Evergreen Poems”:  Celebrate the Earth with poet Ira Jo Fisher
as he reads nature poetry. Environmental
Center, 12:30pm-1:30pm.

 

Thursday,
April 5
“Climate Change and
Capitalism
”:
Prof. Gus Karam will discuss a paradigm shift for climate change.
Environmental Center, 2:00-3:00pm.

 

Monday,
April 9 “Live Simplified”
:
Prof. Angelo Spillo, director of Pace’s environmental center, will offer
some simple things we can do to reduce our “footprint.” Environmental Center  10:00am-11:00am.

 

Tuesday,
April 10
Hudson River Painters
Presentation:
 Slide presentation of Hudson River paintings with
Prof. Mark Cassata. Entrance 3, Kessel Student Center, Butcher Suite, 10:00am-11:00am.

 

Tuesday,
April 10

“Don’t Frack with Our Water”:  Ideas to ban hydraulic fracturing in NY for safe,
renewable energy. Panel led by Professor Delahanty, Butcher Suite, 12:20-2:30.

 

Wednesday, April
11 Environmental Center Open House:

Center’s museum will be open to show its wildlife exhibits. Refreshments
will be served. Environmental Center, 10:00am-3:30pm

 

Wednesday,
April 11 “
What is Alienation from Nature?”: Discussion led by visiting scholar and philosophy professor
Prof. Steve Vogel. Kessel Student
Center,
Gottesman
room, 12:30-1:30pm

 

Thursday,
April 12 Spring Nature Walk:
Nature walk with environmental
center Assisntat Director James Eyring to discover signs of spring!  Leaving from the Environmental Center, 11:00am-12:00pm.

Thursday,
April 12
“How Many is too Many
People?

Documentary and discussion with Prof. Gus Karam about the size of the human
population and the environmental implications. Kessel Student Center, Gottesman
room.  12:30-2:00pm

 

Saturday,
April 14
  E–Waste Collection: Environmental Club (N.A.T.U.R.E.) fundraiser
collecting old electronics to be recycled.  General public can bring electronics to be
recycled. Vineyard, 901 Bedford Road, next to entrance 1, 10:00am-2:00pm.

 

Monday,
April 16 Tree Planting:
  Environmental
science students will promote conservation of timber resources and invite all
to help plant a tree. Kessel Student Center Patio, 10:00am-11:00am.

 

Tuesday,
April 17 “Get Fit with Nature”:
Enjoy
a refreshing campus hike in the woods on campus. Free refreshments at the end. Leaves
from the Environmental Center, 11:30am-12:30pm.

 

Tuesday,
April 17 Student Photo Show:
Students will display their
best nature photography from April 18-26.
Setter’s Lounge, Kessel Student Center.

 

Thursday,
April 19
“Wild World of Animals”:  Bring the kids! The Pace Environmental Club (N.A.T.U.R.E.)
is sponsoring a guest presentation with exotic wildlife. Kessel Student Center,
5:00pm-6:00pm.

 

Friday,
April 20 “RIO+20”:
A simulation on sustainable development. Professor Greg
Julian, 9:00am-1:00pm.

 

Monday,
April 23 Interpretive Campus Walk:
Guided walk around campus to
learn about nature. Leaving from the Environmental Center, 10:00am-11:00am.

 

Tuesday,
April 24
“Bee Aware!” Presentation
about the reasons and implications of losing millions of honeybees annually. Environmental
Center, 1:30-2:15pm.

 

Wednesday,
April 25
  Birds of Prey Presentation:  A
presentation of live falcons, hawks and owls with Master Falconer and Assistant
Director of the Environmental Center James Eyring. Bring the kids! Environmental
Center, 6:30-7:30pm.

 

 

For details and descriptions of all programs, go to: www.pace.edu/dyson/earthmonth

 

To
register for an event, please contact Betty at 914-773-3789 or bsclocco@pace.edu

 

 

For more information contact Angelo Spillo at aspillo@pace.edu or 914-773-3530.

 

Military Advanced Education: “Pace to Encourage Entrepreneurship”

Military Advanced Education, the Journal of Higher Learning for Today’s Servicemember, reports on the opening of Pace’s new Entrepreneurship Lab in the April issue.

Military Advanced Education saluted Pace’s launch of an Entrepreneurship (E-Lab) which is expected to both nuture the entrepreneurial spirit on campus and serve as a beacon for innovation in the Lower Manhattan community. In addition to the site in Manhattan, the publication noted that Pace opened an Entrepreneurship Lab at the Goldstein Academic Building on its Pleasantville, NY, campus.

Military Advanced Education quoted Neil S. Braun, dean of the Lubin School of Business, on the meaning of entrepreneurship:

“Entrepreneurship, in its broadest sense, is a personal approach for developing ideas into plans and plans into reality. It is interdisciplinary ‘doing.’  Entrepreneurial leadership is as important in large companies as it is in startups; it’s a mindset toward relentless problem solving that leads to successful execution” said Braun, who in his career has assumed many different type of roles, including internet entrepreneur, television network president, corporate attorney, CEO and film producer. “It is therefore at the heart of business education; it is the ultimate capstone for applying the knowledge and skills of the discrete disciplines to a product or service for a specific market opportunity.”

Professor Bruce Bachenheimer, the E-Labs leader, discussed the importance of an entrepreneurial mindset:

“The Entrepreneurship Lab aims to foster an entrepreneurial mindset – a way of thinking and acting that focuses on developing new ways to solve problems and create value,” said Bachenheimer, who drafted the initial proposal of the E- Lab. “These skills are important not only for those seeking to establish a new venture, but are increasingly critical in a wide variety of professional careers given today’s hyper-competitive marketplace, where rapid technological innovation and globalization has led to corporate downsizing and a dramatic change in the very nature of work.”