The Hill’s Congress Blog: “When financial institutions become too big to manage”

“Watching Senators Carl Levin (D-Mich.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) recently grill the top JP Morgan Chase executives and reading the committee report reminded me again how the complex regulations — those that have existed for years and the new ones emanating from the Dodd Frank legislation — have made it so difficult for effective compliance for financial institutions,” writes John Alan James, a professor at Pace.

“Watching Senators Carl Levin (D-Mich.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) recently grill the top JP Morgan Chase executives and reading the committee report reminded me again how the complex regulations — those that have existed for years and the new ones emanating from the Dodd Frank legislation — have made it so difficult for effective compliance for financial institutions,” writes John Alan James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace.

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

American Banker: “Government Should Do More to Spur Housing Recovery”

“The Fed, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and other federal and state agencies should now take steps to encourage banks to use their excess reserves to accommodate credit demand by individuals,” writes Surendra K. Kaushik, professor of finance at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

“The Fed, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and other federal and state agencies should now take steps to encourage banks to use their excess reserves to accommodate credit demand by individuals,” writes Surendra K. Kaushik, professor of finance at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

Read his op-ed on American Banker’s BankThink blog.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Cypriot bailout and use of market mechanism is commendable”

“The European Union, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund have made a good compromise use of market forces to have the owners and uninsured depositors take a loss for their misjudgments in risky investments and thus avoided imposing a deposit levy totally rejected by the people and the Cypriot parliament,” writes Surendra K. Kaushik, a professor of finance at Pace.

“The European Union, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund have made a good compromise use of market forces to have the owners and uninsured depositors take a loss for their misjudgments in risky investments and thus avoided imposing a deposit levy totally rejected by the people and the Cypriot parliament,” writes Surendra K. Kaushik, a professor of finance at Pace.

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

San Diego Union-Tribune: “Does SD’s marketing make a difference?”

. . . While typical of the industry standard for measuring advertising results, the Tourism Authority’s polling could benefit from more rigorous comparisons to markets where its online and TV ads did not appear, said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University in New York.

. . . While typical of the industry standard for measuring advertising results, the Tourism Authority’s polling could benefit from more rigorous comparisons to markets where its online and TV ads did not appear, said Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University in New York.

“My view of the research is it’s better than nothing but it’s misleading because we don’t know what would have happened had people not been exposed to the campaign,” he said. “Still, the effect of no advertising (this spring) will be felt in sequential summers.You have to remind people you exist. You need to know what’s offered beyond just the zoo and SeaWorld.”

Read the article in the San Diego Union-Tribune.

USA Today: “Market gains pump CEO pay; Corporate chiefs pull in $50 million or more”

. . . “Some of these numbers are obscene,” says former compensation consultant John James, director of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation. “But corporate directors have long had the attitude ‘How do we make this guy feel that he’s needed? We can’t afford to lose him.'”

. . . “Some of these numbers are obscene,” says former compensation consultant John James, director of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation. “But corporate directors have long had the attitude ‘How do we make this guy feel that he’s needed? We can’t afford to lose him.'”

Read the article in USA Today.

American Banker: “Federal Regulators Must Tread Softly on Executive Pay”

“Executive compensation is an important issue,” writes John Alan James of Pace’s Lubin School of Business. “However, changing the longstanding structures of corporate law and the roles and responsibilities of bank boards would alter the long recognized role of elected board members to have sole responsibility for policy creation and implementation, including the compensation of corporate executives.”

“Executive compensation is an important issue,” writes John Alan James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “However, changing the longstanding structures of corporate law and the roles and responsibilities of bank boards would alter the long recognized role of elected board members to have sole responsibility for policy creation and implementation, including the compensation of corporate executives.”

Read his op-ed on American Banker’s BankThink blog.

TravelAgentCentral.com: “Experts Weigh in on Senator Charles Schumer’s Call for A Cruise Passenger ‘Bill of Rights'”

“A ‘bill of rights’ for cruise passengers, as suggested by Sen. Charles Schumer, would have to go through the IMO or the international organization that governs international tickets,” said Andrew O. Coggins, Jr., Clinical Professor of Management at Pace’s Lubin School of Business.

“A ‘bill of rights’ for cruise passengers, as suggested by Sen. Charles Schumer, would have to go through the IMO or the international organization that governs international tickets,” said Andrew O. Coggins, Jr., Clinical Professor of Management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “The US Coast Guard is our nation’s representative at the IMO in Geneva.”

Read more of his comments on TravelAgentCentral.com.

E-Commerce Times: “FTC Puts a Damper on Freewheeling Digital Advertising”

. . “It would be impossible for the FTC to prescribe a method or remedy for every medium, because it would be like a game of Whack-a-Mole,” said Paul Kurnit, a marketing professor at Pace University.. “For every new platform today, there will be five more that will pop up tomorrow.”

. . . “It would be impossible for the FTC to prescribe a method or remedy for every medium, because it would be like a game of Whack-a-Mole,” Paul Kurnit, a marketing professor at Pace University, told the E-Commerce Times. “For every new platform today, there will be five more that will pop up tomorrow.”

With new social and digital media, there are myriad ways to put messages out, Kurnit observed, and consumers receive them in much more interactive and personal ways.

“So, in this new and evolving commercial marketplace, the old adage ‘buyer beware’ is more critical than ever,” he pointed out, “but so is the requirement ‘advertiser be responsible.'”

MacNewsWorld: “Supply Chain Snags Weigh Down Apple’s Stock”

. . . “Entrepreneurial-minded individuals taking a de facto leave from Apple may actually be beneficial to the firm,” said Joseph Pastore, professor emeritus at Lubin School of Business at Pace University.

. . . “Entrepreneurial-minded individuals taking a de facto leave from Apple may actually be beneficial to the firm,” Joseph Pastore, professor emeritus at Lubin School of Business at Pace University, told MacNewsWorld. “If they hit upon a new direction, they will need the financial and brand strength of the established firm to make it work. Sometimes innovation is spurred more by allowing entrepreneurially-minded individuals to separate from the more bureaucratic, permanent organization and go off on their own, less impeded by organizational constraints and politics.”

Losing talent isn’t a concern that is specific to Apple, Pastore pointed out. It’s a popular Silicon Valley refrain, and Apple won’t let it dictate how the company operates going forward.

“There will always be shifting competition, and the intensely entrepreneurial nature of the sector will always have shifting alliances and changing personalities. To the extent that is happening at Apple, it is no surprise, nor should we see it as a game changer. Apple won’t let that happen”