CNBC.com: “Have Twinkies Killed the Union Movement?”

. . . “Unions have been very good in the past making sure we have benefits like maternity leave, but their leadership continues to think only of themselves and not their members,” said John Alan James of Pace.

. . . Most union workers are public sector employees with only 7 percent of private sector workers—like those from Hostess—belonging to unions, according to the BLS.

This lack of membership shows how irrelevant unions have become, said John Alan James, a business management consultant and staff member at Pace University.

“Unions have been very good in the past making sure we have benefits like maternity leave, but their leadership continues to think only of themselves and not their members,” James said.

“Employees are left to ask themselves why should I pay dues when I don’t see any positive results,” he added.

Read the article on CNBC.com.

MacNewsWorld: “Apple’s Q1 Beats Wall Street, but Breaks a Profit Streak”

. . . “Given the disruptive nature of the industry and the temporary advantage firms are likely to have, this is a moment where faith in Apple has waned,” said Joseph Pastore of Pace. “Yes, sales are strong, but sales are the result of yesterday’s decisions, and confidence in this industry is built not on what a firm has done, but what it is likely to do.”

. . . Despite all the rumors, the campaign against Cook isn’t likely to result in him looking for new work. It is an indication, thought, that some Apple investors, analysts and fans are irritated, said Joseph Pastore, professor Emeritus at Lubin School of Business at Pace University.

“This is not about the merits of Tim Cook,” he told MacNewsWorld. “This is about a classic moment in which a fundamentally talented leader finds himself, and his firm, in the midst of the proverbial perfect storm.”

The storm, in this case, is a tech industry that is relatively strong, but Apple hasn’t recently proved it’s the undisputed leader. Investors want to see a strong next-generation iPhone and a more stable stock price, said Pastore.

“Given the disruptive nature of the industry and the temporary advantage firms are likely to have, this is a moment where faith in Apple has waned,” he noted. “Yes, sales are strong, but sales are the result of yesterday’s decisions, and confidence in this industry is built not on what a firm has done, but what it is likely to do.”

It also doesn’t help that Cook had big shoes to fill, Pastore added.

“Tim Cook is still in the shadows of Steve Jobs, adding more weight to the adage, ‘Never follow Lombardi, always follow Lombardi’s successor.’ It’s not fair, but it is so.”

Read the story by MacNewsWorld.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Congress must enact tax reform without territorial taxation”

“A territorial tax system would serve to encourage the shifting of activities offshore, and, with it, taxable profits and jobs,” writes Philip Cohen of Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

What does Loophole Expansion have to do with Tax Reform?

“Many companies are seeking to lower the federal tax rate that publicly-traded and other ‘C’ corporations pay on taxable income,”  writes Philip Cohen, a professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “This is in line with a broad consensus that U.S. corporate (and perhaps individual) tax rates should be lowered, with the revenue lost from this effort made up for by limiting or eliminating certain exemptions and deductions, which is often referred to as broadening the base.

“Some of this effort has been characterized as loophole closing. While not a popular view among the U.S. corporate tax community, some have argued that loophole closing should also be used to raise additional revenue to pay-down deficits and stimulate job creation in the U.S. 

”

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

 

 

Los Angeles Times: “Carnival to upgrade fleet in wake of Triumph debacle”

. . . The investment will bring Carnival’s older ships in line with recent standards that require cruise ships built in the last few years to provide passengers with working bathrooms, ventilation and other basic services in the event of an accident, said Andrew O. Coggins, Jr., a professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

. . . The investment will bring Carnival’s older ships in line with recent standards that require cruise ships built in the last few years to provide passengers with working bathrooms, ventilation and other basic services in the event of an accident, said Andrew O. Coggins, Jr., a professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

Read the article in Los Angeles Times.

Also read comments from Professor Coggins in Miami Herald.

Forbes: “Bruce Bachenheimer, Man of Mystery”

Twice a month Enstitute hosts speakers–and treats them to a home-cooked meal. Bruce Bachenheimer is the head of Pace University’s entrepreneurship lab. Bachenheimer, who is working on an autobiography, has stories for days.

Twice a month Enstitute hosts speakers–and treats them to a home-cooked meal. Bruce Bachenheimer is the head of Pace University’s entrepreneurship lab. Bachenheimer, who is working on an autobiography, has stories for days.

Read more on Forbes.com:

Bruce Bachenheimer, Man of Mystery

The Apprentices: Learn-By-Doing Entrepreneurship At Enstitute

Also read his comments in the American Express Open Forum article, 6 “Shark Tank” Lessons for Entrepreneurs

 

 

Crain’s New York Business: “Delivering the perfect pitch – Startups flock to business-plan competitions to win cash and publicity.”

. . . “In this era of the lean startup, when entrepreneurs must continuously refine their business models in a fast-moving marketplace, these competitions are like rocket fuel,” said professor Bruce Bachenheimer, director of entrepreneurship at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, which hosts its own business-plan competition.

. . . “In this era of the lean startup, when entrepreneurs must continuously refine their business models in a fast-moving marketplace, these competitions are like rocket fuel,” said professor Bruce Bachenheimer, director of entrepreneurship at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, which hosts its own business-plan competition.

Read the article in Crain’s New York Business.

E-Commerce Times: “Tweets Added to Bloomberg’s Financial News Portfolio”

. . . “There are many people on Twitter who are misrepresenting their identity or misrepresenting their information sources and also distorting information,” Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University, told the E-Commerce Times. “These factors will greatly limit any reliance [on Twitter feeds] as a source of financial news. The mainstream financial press will be seen as even more valuable and important.”

. . . “There are many people on Twitter who are misrepresenting their identity or misrepresenting their information sources and also distorting information,” Larry Chiagouris, professor of marketing at Pace University, told the E-Commerce Times. “These factors will greatly limit any reliance [on Twitter feeds] as a source of financial news. The mainstream financial press will be seen as even more valuable and important.”

 

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Remembering the ‘Iron Lady'”

“She was known as the ‘Iron Lady’ because she literally stood up physically to tough union leaders and told them how things were going to be with her in charge,” writes John Alan James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace. “And they did back down.”

“She was known as the ‘Iron Lady’ because she literally stood up physically to tough union leaders and told them how things were going to be with her in charge,” writes John Alan James, executive director of the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace. “And they did back down.”
Read more on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

New York Times: “Little Accountability for Directors, Despite Poor Performance”

. . . The study, co-authored by Andrew Lund of Pace University School of Law and Robert Schonlau of Brigham Young University‘s Marriott School of Management, analyzed director turnover at financial institutions in the Standard & Poor’s 1,500-stock index from 2006 to 2010.

. . . The study, co-authored by Andrew Lund of Pace University School of Law and Robert Schonlau of Brigham Young University‘s Marriott School of Management, analyzed director turnover at financial institutions in the Standard & Poor’s 1,500-stock index from 2006 to 2010. The idea is that the financial crisis was particularly salient — and if anything would ever push directors to act, it was likely the financial crisis.

Read the article by New York Times DealBook.

Cruise Critic: “Cruise Bill of Rights has Flaws”

. . . “The Airline Passenger Bill of Rights applies to U.S. airlines and planes, U.S. and foreign flag, [that fly into] U.S. airports,” Dr. Andrew O. Coggins Jr., told Cruise Critic. Coggins is a professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and specializes in cruise industry and travel and tourism management.

. . . “The Airline Passenger Bill of Rights applies to U.S. airlines and planes, U.S. and foreign flag, [that fly into] U.S. airports,” Dr. Andrew O. Coggins Jr., told Cruise Critic. Coggins is a professor of management at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business and specializes in cruise industry and travel and tourism management.
With cruise ships, he explained, once they’ve sailed beyond 200 miles from the U.S. coast, they are regulated by the law of the “high seas,” which is the I.M.O., and the laws of their flag country. How, then, could a U.S.-based bill of rights law apply to passengers once they were beyond 200 miles from the United States?
Coggins suggested that instead of a U.S. law being enacted, the Cruise Lines International Association could develop such a bill of rights. It wouldn’t be legally binding but could be a requirement for CLIA membership.
Read more on the Cruise Critic blog.