Leaders in Management Award Recipient Gurbaksh Chahal Profiled in Dolce Vita Magazine

Dolce Vita, a quarterly magazine which caters to luxury living and the good life, profiled Internet tycoon Gurbaksh Chahal, a 2010 Leaders in Management Award recipient, and included his namesake Pace scholarship program aimed at encouraging aspiring entrepreneurs.

Dolce Vita, a quarterly magazine which caters to luxury living and the good life, profiled Internet tycoon Gurbaksh Chahal, a 2010 Leaders in Management Award recipient, and included his namesake Pace scholarship program aimed at encouraging aspiring entrepreneurs.

Summer on the River with Faculty Members and Students from Institutions Throughout the Region

media are invited to spend a day on the Hudson River with, or to interview, faculty members and students in the sixth year of a unique summer floating seminar that travels the river by ship, creating college curriculum units.

Contacts:

Chris Cory, Pace University, 212-346-1117, cell 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Alyssa Vine, Barnard College, 212-854-7907, avine@barnard.edu

Media invitation:

Summer rolling on the Hudson by 55-member college consortium produces curriculum modules ranging from environment to art

Media welcome aboard next week

Next week (July 19-23), media are invited to spend a day on the Hudson River with, or to interview, faculty members and students participating in River Summer, a program in the sixth year as a unique summer floating seminar that travels the river by ship, creating college curriculum units.

A fetching photo of participants on deck in life jackets, catching up on their common reading with the Hudson in the background, is at http://www.riversummer.org/photos/module2_2010.html

Next week’s sessions start in Poughkeepsie, but participants are available by phone. River Summer is a program of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities, a consortium of 55 colleges and universities in the Hudson watershed. So far nearly 300 students and faculty members have participated in the program since its inaugural launch in 2005, and participants have created interdisciplinary modules that are posted at http://www.riversummer.org/curricula/field.html. The modules cover subjects ranging from marsh ecology to the Hudson River painters and urban development. Insights also go into participants’ research and teaching.

Next week’s onboard topics range from managing fisheries to the St. Lawrence Cement Company.

The formation of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities was spearheaded by Pace University and is now headquartered at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. Major grant funding for River Summer has been obtained principally by Barnard College of Columbia University from the Andrew Mellon Foundation and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. River Summer is coordinated by Tim Kenna and Margie Turrin of Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory.

Please call either of us to make arrangements. See www.riversummer.org and details below.

Schedule for next week:

The focus is on options for the future of the river and its communities.

Embark: Poughkeepsie, Waryas Park

Disembark: Poughkeepsie, Waryas Park

Monday 7/19/10 –Poughkeepsie to Kingston

1000 Module 2 participants Arrive

1100- 1430 – Kathy Hattala, DEC Fisheries Unit – Managing our fishing resources, Brian Jensen, College of St. Rose

Title of curriculum: Fisheries – trawling, seining

1500 – 1700 Stuart Findlay, Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies

Title of curriculum: The changing role of the marshes in the Hudson River – and

Sea Level Rise

1700 Transit to Kingston

View marshes along the river

Evening – Discussion Layout

Journaling – group

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Tuesday 7/20/10 Kingston

0900-1700 – Steve Schimmrich – SUNY Ulster

Title of curriculum: The Geologic resources of the Upper Hudson – Shale,

Titanium, Cement etc. & the role in the Hudson Valley long term

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Wednesday 7/21/10 Kingston

0900-1700 – Jennifer Schwartz Berky, Bard College

Title of curriculum: Kingston tales of resistance and resilience & Climate Action

Plan

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Thursday 7/22/10 – Kingston to Catskills

0700 Transit to Catskill

0900-1300 Ted Eismeier, Hamilton College –

Drop Hudson City Boat Launch at the foot of Water Street

Title of curriculum: The story of St. Lawrence Cement Controversy –

Hudson NY

1300-1700 – Ann LePore, Ramapo College

Title of curriculum: – 3-D Data Modeling – using art to convey your message

————————————————————————————-

Friday 7/23/010 Transit Catskill to Poughkeepsie

0900 – 1500 Module 3 participants final wrap up of project

1500 Students depart

Hudson-based curricular components completed or nearing completion

• Brian Jensen – Fisheries Biology

• Carol Rietsma – Marsh Ecology

• Steve Schimmrich – Geology of the Lower Hudson Valley

• Dan Farkas – Introduction to Using GIS Mapping

• Marilyn Powers – New Urbanism, the Political Economy of the Hudson River Valley and a Walking Tour Case Study

• Elizabeth Hutchinson – The Hudson River School of Art

• Michelle Land/Lee Paddock/Alex Dunn – An Environmental History of Law in The Hudson Valley

In progress: (Many preliminary presentations and lectures are posted)

• Tim Kenna – Visualizing estuarine circulation

• Ted Eismeier – Political Economy of the HV

• Margie Turrin/Karl Kehde – Community Planning/Brownfield Redevelopment in the HV

• Susan Fox Rogers – Free Writing

• Roger Panetta – Panoramas

• Howard Horowitz – Land Use in the Hudson Highlands

• Lucy Johnson – Early Man Decision Making Grid linked to a field guide of the historic uses of Denning’s Point

• Geoff Brackett – The Hudson River as a Literary Source

• Bruce Selleck – Using GPS and GIS for data collection and display

Pace-Led Team Finds That New York Sustainable Biofuel Could Help Decrease Greenhouse Gas Pollution

A report issued by a team led by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center provides insights into possible future liquid transportation solutions. Use of biofuel made from wood, grass and other forms of biomass could reduce New York State’s gasoline consumption by as much as 16% of projected use in 2020 and play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 773-3312, ccea@pace.edu

Pace-Led Team Finds That New York Sources of Sustainable Biofuel Could Help Decrease Greenhouse Gas Pollution, Create Jobs, and Increase Energy Security

WHITE PLAINS, NY (June 7, 2010) – A report issued by a team led by Pace Law School’s Energy and Climate Center provides insights into possible future liquid transportation solutions. Use of biofuel made from wood, grass and other forms of biomass could reduce New York State’s gasoline consumption by as much as 16% of projected use in 2020 and play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, according to the report.

Produced at the recommendation of Governor David Paterson’s Renewable Energy Task Force, the “Renewable Fuels Roadmap and Sustainable Biomass Feedstock Supply for New York State” (Roadmap) was developed to help guide state policy on renewable fuels.  The project was undertaken with funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

To conduct the study, the Pace Energy and Climate Center assembled a team of the leading authorities on biofuels throughout the Northeast, including researchers from Cornell University and the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and from consulting firms on energy and environmental issues such as Energetics, Energy and Environmental Research Associates, and Antares Group.  The coalition known as Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management as well as Cornell Cooperative Extension branches throughout New York State were also members of the Pace-led team.

The Roadmap evaluates the future of liquid biofuel production and feedstock supplies (materials used to produce the biofuels) for transportation purposes in New York State in order to achieve reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as well as achieve greater independence from petroleum usage.  In Executive Order No. 24 issued in August 2009, New York adopted a goal of achieving an 80% reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 levels by 2050, or an 80 by 50 target.  The Roadmap presents a snapshot of New York’s current biomass production, including agricultural products and forest products, as well as existing biomass feedstock inventory.  The Roadmap also considers land use issues, transportation and distribution infrastructure, competing uses for biomass, and technologies that are necessary to convert feedstocks to biofuels, for example, grasses or woody material to produce ethanol or soy to produce biodiesel.  In its analysis, the Roadmap examines the potential effects of increased use of renewable fuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel on economic development, the environment, and public health.

“The Roadmap sheds light on important aspects of how New York’s transportation infrastructure will develop,” stated Jamie Van Nostrand, Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center.  “In order to achieve an 80 by 50 target, we need to transition the transportation sector away from carbon-emitting fuels, either through electrification or use of renewable fuels.  Given the time it will take to transition to electric cars and to build the electrical grid infrastructure necessary to power this new fleet, ethanol-gasoline mixtures will still be a necessary component of this transition.”

“There is no silver bullet for ensuring New York’s clean energy future,“ according to Zywia Wojnar, Research Director at the Pace Energy and Climate Center, and Roadmap Project Manager.  “Biofuels could be an integral part of the fuel mix that is necessary to limit greenhouse gas emissions, while reducing dependency on fossil fuels.  The Roadmap provides important insights into just how a New York biofuels industry could help meet those goals.”

Some of the key findings include:

  • Based only on in-state feedstocks (e.g., perennial grasses, woody biomass, and soy from which biofuels are produced), New York could provide 5.6 – 16% of estimated 2020 gasoline consumption by the residents of New York State.
  • Biomass-based liquid fuels, or biofuels, potentially can play a large role in reducing the state’s emissions of greenhouse gases, which are a leading contributor to global warming.  A new industry that makes cellulosic biofuels from feedstocks grown in a sustainable manner has the potential to decrease GHG emissions by between 67% and 85% compared to the equivalent energy content of petroleum fuel.
  • Potentially negative environmental effects from the production of biofuels in New York State include deteriorated air quality, soil erosion, impaired water quality, acidification of water and soil, and reduced biodiversity.  Implementing appropriate best management practices in growing and harvesting the feedstocks would minimize some of these adverse effects.
  • Compared to fossil fuels, in a total life cycle analysis of cellulosic biofuels from sustainable feedstocks, levels of certain air pollutant emissions may be reduced, such as sulfur oxides and benzene. Levels of other pollutants may increase, such as nitrogen oxides, aldehydes, and particulate matter.  Increased emissions of some air pollutants may lead to increased public health concerns such as cardio-vascular diseases.
  • Four centralized large-scale or 24 smaller-scale biofuels product facilities could operate with sustainably available biomass in the State.
  • An assessment of the current technologies to convert biomass to advanced biofuels suggests that the industry is five to ten years away from commercial production.
  • Depending upon the rate at which the biofuels industry grows, between 4,000 and 14,000 jobs could be created state-wide.
  • Establishing a sustainable biofuels industry based upon the information provided in the Roadmap will require the adoption of new policies by New York State lawmakers.

Annual updates to the Roadmap report will be prepared in 2011 and 2012 in order to address technological improvements and policy developments.

A copy of the Roadmap can be found at www.law.pace.edu/energy/programs.

The Energy and Climate Center is an integral part of Pace Law School’s environmental law program, which regularly is ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the nation’s top environmental law programs.  For more than 20 years, the Energy and Climate Center has been a leading multi-disciplinary organization in the areas of environmental research and policy on energy issues in New York and throughout the Northeast, while training law students in these areas.www.law.pace.edu/energy

Founded in 1976, Pace University School of Law has nearly 6,700 alumni throughout the country and the world. It offers full- and part-time day and evening JD programs on its White Plains, NY, campus. The School also offers the Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Climate Change Law, and in Comparative Legal Studies as well as an SJD in environmental law. The School of Law is part of a comprehensive, independent, and diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. www.law.pace.edu.

Professor Puts Twilight in Historical Context in New Book

With the announcement of the release date of the latest movie in the Twilight series, set to hit theaters in fall of next year, fans are again setting their sights on one of the hottest film series of our time.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PROFESSOR PUTS TWILIGHT IN HISTORICAL CONTEXT IN NEW BOOK

Cover image available upon request

NEW YORK, NY, May 14, 2010 – With the announcement of the release date of the latest movie in the Twilight series, set to hit theaters in fall of next year, fans are again setting their sights on one of the hottest film series of our time.

Vampires and their love lives are the newest craze – and before that it was all about wizards. But are these themes and characters really so new?

Not even close, according to Pace University History Professor Nancy Reagin, editor of the recently published “Twilight and History” (Wiley; April 2010; ISBN: 978-0-470-58178-0; $17.95; Paper).

She finds fan culture surrounding these stories – from Muggles to Trek fans to the Twilight-obsessed – fascinating. After working on her third monograph: “Getting A Life: Early Fandoms In Late 19th and 20th Century Europe and America” and other works on the history of various fan communities, publisher Wiley asked her to edit several books on history and pop culture including the Twilight book as well as “Harry Potter and History,” which will be out in 2011.

“I wanted to do something that was a little bit more upbeat,” said Reagin, whose previous research and writing focused on German history, gender and sexuality, nationalism and national identity, and Nazi women in occupied Poland during WWII.

Each chapter of “Twilight and History” explores the history behind a Twilight character and other aspects of the story.

“Authors often take pieces of actual history and use them as building blocks for an imaginary world,” Reagin said. This spring she screened clips from the film “Kingdom of Heaven” during a class on the Second Crusade. “Students are watching these battle scenes and all they can think of is ‘Lord of the Rings,’ and the battle at Helm’s Deep in The Two Towers, since Tolkien uses medieval military technology and tactics.”

The book includes a chapter written by two of Reagin’s former students at Pace, Grace and Laura Loiacono, who are also writing a chapter for the forthcoming “Harry Potter and History.” Spoiler Alert: Their chapter is about Alice, the character who was incarcerated in an insane asylum in 1920s. They researched and wrote about what it was like to be a patient in an asylum during that time period.

“I love the Twilight series and was interested in deeply exploring the various historical aspects of one of my favorite characters, Alice,” said Grace, who graduated in 2007 with a dual major in History and Women’s and Gender Studies and recently completed a Master’s of Library and Information Science from the Pratt Institute.

Her sister Laura graduated from Pace in 2009 with a dual major in English and History and a minor in Women’s Studies. She is currently attending graduate school for English literature and will eventually complete a degree in Education. She hopes to become a teacher.

“I learned how to connect historical fact with one of my favorite young adult fiction series. This project has taught me how to look deeper into a work of fiction where I might otherwise only have skimmed the surface,” Laura said.

With the popularity of these fantasy books and films, there’s clearly a market for these books. “Fans will run through a whole series,” Reagin said. “They see all the movies or read all the books and then wish there was more,” she said. “Fans enjoy diving into characters’ backgrounds.”

Read more about Nancy Reagin on her personal website at http://webpage.pace.edu/nreagin/cv.html.

About Pace University

For 104 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV.

About Wiley

Founded in 1807, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. has been a valued source of information and understanding for more than 200 years, helping people around the world meet their needs and fulfill their aspirations. Wiley and its acquired companies have published the works of more than 400 Nobel laureates in all categories: Literature, Economics, Physiology or Medicine, Physics, Chemistry, and Peace.

Our core businesses publish scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, encyclopedias, books, and online products and services; professional/trade books, subscription products, training materials, and online applications and Web sites; and educational materials for undergraduate and graduate students and lifelong learners. Wiley’s global headquarters are located in Hoboken, New Jersey, with operations in the U.S., Europe, Asia, Canada, and Australia. The Company’s Web site can be accessed at www.wiley.com, with the latest news from Wiley available in our online global press room at www.wiley.com/go/press. The Company is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbols JWa and JWb.

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Paul Kurnit, Co-Author “The Little Blue Book of Marketing: Build a Killer Plan in Less Than a Day”

A marketing plan is the roadmap that identifies where an organization is now, where it wants to be, and how it will get there. Many businesses think they have such a plan. But what they really have is a budget, a sales goal … or an excuse.
That’s according to Paul Kurnit and Steve Lance, co-authors of the just-published The Little Blue Book of Marketing: Build a Killer Plan in Less Than a Day (Penguin/Portfolio). Kurnit is an advertising executive and professor of marketing and advertising at Pace University who has been facilitating “Marketing Plans in a Day” for over ten years. Lance is a former creative director at NBC with 30 years’ experience in major advertising agencies who regularly guest lectures at advertising clubs, clients and universities.

Media Contact: Samuella Becker, Pace University, 212-346-1637, cell 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

An easy and elegant method to create smart, collaborative marketing plans fast!

“THE LITTLE BLUE BOOK OF MARKETING: BUILD A KILLER PLAN IN LESS THAN A DAY” (Penguin/Portfolio), CO-AUTHORED BY PACE UNIVERSITY PROFFESSOR PAUL KURNIT, OFFERS A WAY TO BUILD POWERFUL PLANS THAT CAN BE PUT INTO IMMEDIATE ACTION

NEW YORK, NY, February 12, 2010 – A marketing plan is the roadmap that identifies where an organization is now, where it wants to be, and how it will get there. Many businesses think they have such a plan. But what they really have is a budget, a sales goal … or an excuse.

That’s according to Paul Kurnit and Steve Lance, co-authors of the just-published The Little Blue Book of Marketing: Build a Killer Plan in Less Than a Day (Penguin/Portfolio). Kurnit is an advertising executive and professor of marketing and advertising at Pace University who has been facilitating “Marketing Plans in a Day” for over ten years. Lance is a former creative director at NBC with 30 years’ experience in major advertising agencies who regularly guest lectures at advertising clubs, clients and universities.

What if companies could create powerful, collaborative marketing plans in less than a day?

“The Little Blue Book of Marketing shows businesses how to do just that. It is “filled with tools and tips, along with the means and methods to get a firm’s marketing on track,” says Kurnit. “It’s a practical, nuts-and-bolts guide to developing an action plan for anyone and everyone who wants to focus smart, positive action that will drive optimal business results.”

A killer marketing plan is not created by the marketing department alone, the authors say. The Little Blue Book of Marketing advocates “togetherness” — interaction across departments including finance, legal, sales, research & development, human resources, manufacturing and marketing. The book argues that harnessing the company’s own internal brain trust is crucial to bringing a marketing vision to life.

“This must-have manual offers something for everyone, whether you are launching a new brand or freshening up an existing one,” according to Donny Deutsch, the chairman of the Deutsch Inc. agency, and host of CNBC-TV’s “The Entrepreneurs.”

FOR NONPROFITS AND “MOM AND POPS,” TOO

Kurnit and Lance think those who will benefit from their “Marketing Plan in a Day” advice include:

• Entrepreneurs and small business owners who need to figure out how to market their product or services

• CMOs who are assessing the role of marketing in their organization

• Brand managers and marketing managers who need to get their team on the same page with similar objectives

• Pro bono, pro social and cause-related marketers • Promotion and PR managers

• New-media managers, social networkers and web designers

• “Mom and Pop” and home-based businesses.

ABOUT PAUL KURNIT

Kurnit is clinical professor of marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, teaching courses in Advertising, Creative, Marketing, International, Media and Trend Tracking. He also is the university advisor for the student competition run by the American Advertising Federation. He and Lance are co-founders of PS Insights, a consulting firm, and he is founder and president of Kurnit Communications and KidShop. Formerly, as President of Griffin Bacal, a DDB agency, Kurnit played a key role in Hasbro’s growth into a leading international toy and entertainment company. His other advertising and market credits include helping create hundreds of syndicated, network and international TV programs including Transformers, GI Joe, My Little Pony, The Tick for Fox and The Mask for CBS.

Pace Senior Environmental Fellow John Cronin Honored in New Book on His Work

For 35 years John Cronin has been at the heart of saving the Hudson River ecosystem, a role model for environmental efforts around the nation. But he has not been alone. In this new collection of essays, a range of writers — among them scientists, activists, scholars and clergymen — describe Cronin’s life and work, offering a unique glimpse into his extraordinary contribution to protecting our water resources.

Contacts:

Chris Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117, 917-608-8164, ccory@pace.edu

Michelle Land, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, 914-422-4076, mland@law.pace.edu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Review copies and photos available on request

Life and work of John Cronin, “Hero for the Planet” and Pace University Senior Fellow in Environmental Affairs, celebrated in new anthology

Contributions by Pete Seeger, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Maurice Hinchey and others

A River’s Pleasure: Essays in Honor of John Cronin Edited by Michelle D. Land and Susan Fox Rogers Pace University Press; Publication date December 7, 2009 ISBN: 0-944473-96-2, Pages: 185, Price $40.00 Professional educator discount of $32 if ordered from the publisher

NEW YORK, NY, December 4, 2009 – For 35 years John Cronin has been at the heart of saving the Hudson River ecosystem, a role model for environmental efforts around the nation. But he has not been alone. In this new collection of essays, a range of writers — among them scientists, activists, scholars and clergymen — describe Cronin’s life and work, offering a unique glimpse into his extraordinary contribution to protecting our water resources.

“A River’s Pleasure” (Pace University Press, $40.00), an intimate and thought-provoking book, offers readers an episodic narrative of a pioneering and influential part of the modern environmental movement, including a look forward into its future.

“A River’s Pleasure” contains 21 pieces of writing that range from an exclusive interview with Pete Seeger to an in-depth profile by The New Yorker writer Alec Wilkinson and an insightful essay from Nicholas Robinson, a globally recognized architect of international environmental law and a Pace law professor. The contributors also include John Horgan, a former senior writer at Scientific American, Anthony DePalma, formerly of The New York Times, an IBM executive, a photo-essayist, an archeologist trying to keep looters away from eight-acre Magdalen Island, and a shad fishing riverman who recalls a cleaner river.

The volume was produced by Pace’s new, interdisciplinary Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, where Cronin is Senior Fellow in Environmental Affairs. He is also Director and CEO of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

Geoffrey L. Brackett, Pace’s Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, describes Cronin in the book’s foreword as “the perfect combination of arrogance, brilliance, charm and ingenuity” for environmental crusading. Cronin is the politically shrewd visionary who first came to national attention during the years between 1983 and 2000 when he was the Hudson Riverkeeper. Robert F. Kennedy Jr., who became the group’s attorney, recalls how he and Cronin “donned waders and spent weeks walking riverbanks, climbing fences, crawling up pipes and taking samples, and we sat all night on lawn chairs waiting for midnight dumpers….”

But one title does not suffice to characterize John Cronin’s work; as the essays in this collection testify, he has astonishing range and depth. Editor Michelle Land, a Pace professor of environmental policy who is Director of the Pace Academy, writes in her introduction of how the book reveals his “restlessness, continual reinvention” and his role as a “never-ending source of big ideas.”

Cronin’s current focus is environmental problem solving by fostering cooperation at the intersection of policy and innovation – as described by Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman, “the evolution of John’s focus on the Hudson River has incorporated the whole evolution of environmental regulation.”

Emergent ideas described in the book include real-time environmental monitoring analyzed by computer, other intensified uses of science and engineering, increased collaboration with newly green-minded businesses, and a proposed environmental amendment to the US Constitution.

Susan Fox Rogers, co-editor of the book and Visiting Associate Professor of Writing at Bard College writes of Cronin: “In some ways, what he is remains without easy definition. He occupies a unique territory that mixes activist, teacher, and environmentalist…. Like a kid full of hope, the future, not the past is where John lives.”

The book is available at Amazon.com or through Pace University Press.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

A River’s Pleasure: Essays in Honor of John Cronin Edited by Michelle D. Land and Susan Fox Rogers Imprint: Pace University Press. ISBN: 0-944473-96-2. Publication date December 1, 2009. Pages: 185. Price $40 ($32 professional educator discount if ordered from the publisher).

Prof. Katen Challenges Readers to Press Institutions and Governments for End to Middle East Conflict

Pace University Professor Joan Katen has published a book, “Love at the Edge,” that tells a love story of people from rival nations in the Middle East.

Contact: Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

PACE PROFESSOR WRITES OF LOVE IN THE MIDST OF HATE

“Love at the Edge” puts love to the test in the face of the Israeli- Palestinian conflict

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, November 16, 2009 – Pace University Professor Joan Katen has published a book, “Love at the Edge,” that tells a love story of people from rival nations in the Middle East.

The mere mention of the Middle East typically conjures up thoughts of the Israeli- Palestinian conflict and the hate and violence that have destroyed homes, families, lives and nations.

Katen creates a contrast between these struggles and the prevailing strength of love.

Katen is an Adjunct Professor of Political Science and Peace and Justice Studies and specializes in Middle East Politics. She has served as the Regional Vice President of United Nations Association.

“Love at the Edge” tells of young lovers in the midst of the hate from the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. David, an Israeli man and Yasmeen, a Palestinian woman, are university students from different worlds who both decide to study abroad in Paris. Despite their prejudices they are instantly attracted. When they find themselves in danger they are forced to forget their biases in order to survive.

The book is written with an easy-to-read fluidity –what aren’t so easy to read are the accounts of horrific violence that occur in characters’ home countries. The book is told from the perspective of David, and begins in disaster. Hate and senseless violence are introduced in the first chapter.

On Wednesday, December 2 at 6:15 p.m. Katen will give a talk and sign her book in the Mortola Library at Pace University, Pleasantville, 861 Bedford Road, entrance 2.

An end to impasse? “I wrote “Love at the Edge” because I have studied and taught about the Middle East Conflict for many years, beginning with my graduate school experience at Columbia University and the Middle East Institute there,” said Katen. “Hearing more and more about the violence and how it affected children on both sides I felt I had to do something. I believe I have shown how both sides suffer, and yet how people can reconcile their differences and work together if they open their hearts to one another.” “Perhaps the novel will spur readers to push governments to find a solution,” adds Katen. “I based the novel in reality. Most of the things that happen in the novel actually happened. This Palestinian/Israeli conflict seems to have a ripple effect, and it adds to unrest in many areas around the world.” Although the book is characterized as fiction, it is based on true accounts from the conflict in the Middle East.

By writing this love story, Katen aims to “encourage the American public to press for an end to the tragic impasse that has stolen the futures of bright young Arabs and Israelis.”

“Love at the Edge” is published by iUniverse (www.iuniverse.com) and available at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.com (www.bn.com). List price is $19.95, 320 pages, ISBN-10: 1440164533, ISBN-13: 978-1440164538.

About Pace University: For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter @PaceUNews | Flickr | YouTube Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Pace professor’s rediscovery of US slave Harriet Jacobs to climax with new book, Oct. 20 reception

Twenty two years ago, in a room housing mostly-obscure archives, a professor at Pace University chanced on a letter written after the US Civil War by a woman named Harriet Jacobs. The scholar, Jean Fagan Yellin, previously had known Jacobs as a fake. Supposedly, Jacobs (1813-1897) had written a riveting narrative of her life as a slave in North Carolina, but since slaves were kept illiterate, scholars had dismissed the book as nothing more than an abolitionist tract ghosted by the well-known white author listed as the editor. Yellin’s instincts told her differently.

Contact Christopher T. Cory, Pace University Public Information Cell 917 608 8164m ccory@pace.edu

Journalists can obtain a CD of the complete “Papers,” including photos and period cartoons and illustrations, and review copies, from the University of North Carolina Press, Gina_Mahalek@unc.edu, 919-962-0581.

Yellin is available for interviews in person and by telephone in New York through November 21, then in Sarasota, Florida, and in North Carolina November 22 and 23.

PUBLICATON OF “HARRIET JACOBS FAMILY PAPERS” TO CLIMAX REDISCOVERY OF THE SLAVE HARRIET JACOBS BY PACE UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR JEAN FAGAN YELLIN

Inspiring narrative once dismissed as ghost-written is now a classic Other Jacobs writings and background materials to be published in definitive edition Nov. 1 by University of North Carolina Press

New York, NY, October 8, 2008 – Twenty two years ago, in a room housing mostly-obscure archives, a professor at Pace University chanced on a letter written after the US Civil War by a woman named Harriet Jacobs. The scholar, Jean Fagan Yellin, previously had known Jacobs as a fake. Supposedly, Jacobs (1813-1897) had written a riveting narrative of her life as a slave in North Carolina, but since slaves were kept illiterate, scholars had dismissed the book as nothing more than an abolitionist tract ghosted by the well-known white author listed as the editor. Yellin’s instincts told her differently.

A literary scholar, she had read Jacobs’ “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” and now, as she read the letter, similarities of style and tone began to make her suspect that “Incidents” was written by the same person. That suspicion was the thread that led to the next 22 years of Yellin’s scholarly life, to her rescue of Jacobs from over 100 years of obscurity — and to the discovery of a new American hero. Yellin proved beyond doubt that Jacobs book had indeed been “written by herself,” as its subtitle said. Thanks to Yellin, that book is now a classic and on the reading lists of most American students. Because of Yellin’s advocacy volume (published by Harvard University Press) and her biography (Basic Books), not to mention Jacobs’ eloquence, courage in escaping from a sexually-abusive master, and later work as a social worker, abolitionist and journalist, Jacobs’ story has been told in children’s books, in adaptations for the theater, and on television.

Yellin has established her as an American equal in stature to Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth and Harriet Tubman. Culmination.

On November 1, what one scholar has called Yellin’s “monumental” work on Jacobs’ remarkable life reaches a quiet climax in events marking the publication by the University of North Carolina Press of Yellin’s two-volume, definitive collection of “The Harriet Jacobs Family Papers.”

On Monday, October 20, a New York City reception honoring Yellin’s work and the “Papers” will be hosted by Pace University’s English department;

On Saturday, November 22, historical reflections and a reception will go along with a tour led by Yellin of Jacobs haunts in Edenton, North Carolina, the town where Jacobs was enslaved and where her story now is part of the Chamber of Commerce website;

On Sunday, November 23, presentations and a reception will take place at the Bellamy Mansion Museum of History and Decorative Arts in Wilmington, NC, where Yellin did research. The papers provide new information on Jacobs’ life after her escape; on the fights against slavery, racism and sexism of which she was a significant part; and on Jacobs’ relevance to other issues including refugees and how people emerge from slavery. In 1853 Jacobs wrote to a friend: “God… gave me a soul that burned for freedom and a heart nerved with determination to suffer even unto death in pursuit of that liberty which without, makes life an intolerable burden.” This year, Yellin told a Public Radio interviewer: “To me, what’s most important is that she took hold of her life and she had self-respect and a sense of selfhood, and that she thought she could control her life even within limits. And she thought she could sort of help change the world. And she did. “Often, we feel powerless – certainly, pregnant 16-year-old girls seem to feel pretty powerless. And to think that she accomplished that is, to me, quite amazing. She ends up a completely self-respecting woman.”

For 102 years Pace University has produced “professionals who think” by providing high quality professional education resting on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Law School, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

From Boy Soldier to New York Times Bestselling Author: Ishmael Beah to Speak at Pace

Ishmael Beah, author of the New York Times best seller, “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier,” will be giving a lecture at Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts theater on Wednesday, May 7, 2008 at 5:30p.m. The lecture will be followed by a book signing in the Schimmel Lobby.

MEDIA ADVISORY
Contact
Cara Halstead Cea, 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLING AUTHOR ISHMAEL BEAH TO APPEAR AT PACE UNIVERSITY

Lecture will be followed by a signing of Beah’s best-seller, “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier”

NEW YORK, NY – Ishmael Beah, author of the New York Times best seller, “A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier,” will be giving a lecture at Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts theater on Wednesday, May 7, 2008 at 5:30p.m. The lecture will be followed by a book signing in the Schimmel Lobby.

In A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Beah documents his story of devastation and redemption, his struggle to heal, forgive himself, and regain his humanity.

Born in Sierra Leone, West Africa in 1980, Beah was recruited by the government army during a bloody civil war to fight at the tender age of 13. He was rescued by UNICEF and by 1998, moved to the United States where he subsequently finished his last two years of high school at the United National International School in New York. He graduated from Oberlin College in 2004.

He is a member of the Human Rights Watch Children’s Rights Division Advisory Committee and has spoken before the Council on Foreign Relations, the Center for Emerging Threats and Opportunities (CETO) at the Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory, and many other NGO panels on children affected by war. He has also spoken before the United Nations on several occasions. His work has appeared in Vespertine Press and LIT magazine. He currently lives in New York City.

The Schimmel Center for the Arts is part of Pace University’s downtown Manhattan campus East of City Hall, entrance on Spruce Street. The event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. Seating is limited. Contact Patricia Balachich at pb93712n@pace.edu if you plan to attend.

This event is cosponsored by Pace University’s Office of the Provost, School of Education and Phi Delta Kappa, an international professional education association.

Colonial-Era Paternalism Still Hurts Blacks, Says Professor Malone in New Book on Race and Voting

That paternalistic view may be more enlightened than thinking blacks are “essentially different from, and thereby inherently inferior to, whites.” But despite the Civil Rights movement, the condescending blinders of racial paternalism have dominated “the logic of integration … from the 1960’s right up to the present,” argues Christopher Malone, a political scientist who is an associate professor at Pace University, in a new book.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University, (914)906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu
Sarah De Vos, Senior Marketing Manager, Routledge, 212-216-7824, sarah.devos@taylorandfrancis.com

Review copies may be requested from Sarah De Vos, above.

Photo editors — the cover of the book is a vivid, post-Civil War handbill showing a crowd of black people crowding to get through a door labeled “Polls.” The image is from the New York Historical Society (negative # 78876) and may be available from the society or Sarah De Vos.

COLONIAL-ERA PATERNALISM STILL HURTS BLACKS,
SAYS PACE UNIVERSITY POLITICAL SCIENTIST
IN NEW BOOK ON RACE AND VOTING

“Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” published this month

NEW YORK, NY – “The mental, moral, and psychological characteristics found in blacks [are] to be overcome only under the watchful gaze of paternalistic whites.”

That paternalistic view may be more enlightened than thinking blacks are “essentially different from, and thereby inherently inferior to, whites.” But despite the Civil Rights movement, the condescending blinders of racial paternalism have dominated “the logic of integration … from the 1960’s right up to the present,” argues Christopher Malone, a political scientist who is an associate professor at Pace University, in a new book.

“Between Freedom and Bondage: Race, Party, and Voting Rights in the Antebellum North” (Routledge, 2007) puts an x-ray to the broader topic of the denial of basic rights by looking into the ways blacks obtained and lost the vote in four Northern states in the years before the Civil War.

Malone concludes that unequal treatment for blacks comes from a mix of racial belief systems, “racial conflict as an outgrowth of rapid economic and demographic change,” and “political actors [who] … prey on this racial conflict by arousing poorer white working classes.” The racial belief system still in operation, he finds, is paternalism, and it goes back further than most Americans may realize, to the early days of the republic.

Little-known struggles. Malone knows both North and South, having grown up in New Orleans and earned his PhD at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. A popular Pace teacher, he also is director of the Pforzheimer Honors College at Pace’s downtown New York campus.

His book begins with the 2006 reauthorization of the landmark Voting Rights Act first passed in 1965. His narrative then takes the reader back in time by connecting that legislation to the little-known struggles for African-Americans’ right to vote in the antebellum North.

Northerners may be surprised by his evidence that paternalism, dominant in New York State in the Revolutionary period, had receded there by the 1820s. Alexander Hamilton and his cohorts had been “willing to take a chance that blacks possessed the mental capabilities for many of the responsibilities of citizenship.” But at a state Constitutional Convention of 1821, one Samuel Young exemplified a widespread “transformation” when he bluntly said “The minds of blacks are not competent to vote. They are too degraded to estimate the value, or exercise with fidelity and discretion this important right.”

Joining scholars who refute the notion that expansion of the franchise in the U.S. has been steady and “inevitable,” Malone writes: “Nothing is ever inevitable when it comes to the basic rights in American democracy.”

In an epilogue, Malone returns to contemporary racial politics and argues that the unfinished quality of the “Two Reconstructions” – the post- Civil War era and the modern civil rights movement – can be better understood by grasping what happened for African Americans in the early years of the Republic.

Historic blue blood on modern ideas. In a pre-publication review Leon Wynter, author of “American Skin: Pop Culture, Big Business, and the End of White America,” notes that “The party names have evolved …. and even rotated over 300 years, but Malone still draws a straight sociopolitical line between the North’s original blue-blood, slave-holding revolutionaries of 1776 and today’s race politics of paternalism, on both sides of the ideological fence.”

Adds Frances Fox Piven, Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the CUNY Graduate Center and author of numerous books on social movements and voting in the United States, “Malone shows that the basic democratic issue of who shall vote was intimately entwined with the role of race in the economy, in partisan competition, and ultimately in political culture.”

For 101 years Pace University has combined exceptional academics with professional experiences and the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling more than 13,500 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.