NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Distinguished Educators Lecture Featuring Charlotte Danielson

Danielson’s Framework for Teaching is becoming the foundation for the evaluation of teachers in many New York school districts. The discussion topic is framing teacher effectiveness and supporting student success.

“Framing Teacher Effectiveness and Supporting Student Success”

NEW YORK, NY, March 22, 2012 – Teacher accountability is a hot topic in the media and a top political agenda for numerous candidates in this election year. Join Pace University’s School of Education in New York on April 3rd as they host Charlotte Danielson, an internationally recognized expert in the area of teacher effectiveness, for a discussion on teacher evaluation and accountability.

Danielson’s Framework for Teaching is becoming the foundation for the evaluation of teachers in many New York school districts. The discussion topic is framing teacher effectiveness and supporting student success.

This lecture will be of interest to a broad segment including educators, parents, school administrators, and public officials.

This event, one of the Pace School of Education’s Distinguished Educators Lecture series, will be held on Tuesday, April 3rd from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street, New York, NY 10038.  Question and answer session to follow. This event is free and open to the public. Media admission by press pass. RSVP at www.pace.edu/danielsonlecture. For more information contact Merrill Lee Fuchs, (914)-773-3884. View the Flyer here.

About Charlotte Danielson

Charlotte Danielson is an internationally recognized expert in the area of teacher effectiveness, specializing in the design of teacher evaluation systems that assess teacher quality while promoting professional learning. Danielson has taught at all levels, from kindergarten through college, and has worked as an administrator, a curriculum director, and a staff developer throughout the US. In her consulting work she has served hundreds of districts, universities, intermediate agencies, and state departments of education in virtually every state as well as internationally.

In addition to numerous practical instruments and training programs (both onsite and online), Danielson’s many publications include: Enhancing Professional Practice: A Framework for Teaching (2007), Enhancing Student Achievement: A Framework for School Improvement (2002), Teacher Leadership that Strengthens the Profession (2006), and Talk about Teaching! Conducting Professional Conversations (2009).

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:

Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Art Professor Awarded Grant to Research Link Between Augmented Reality and Viewer Response

Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’

Photo editors: This project has good visual elements. Photo opportunities can be arranged upon request.

Virtual reality meets art in newly funded research project

NEW YORK, NY, March 19, 2012 – Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’

Invisible ARtaffects will explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information. The goal is for the exhibitions to create an experience of virtual art which is responsive to viewers. The virtual affects the real, which in turn affects the virtual.

Researchers will include artists from Manifest.AR, the ARtSENSE Consortium of European organizations, and FACT working in collaboration, culminating in a significant exhibition in 2013 at the FACT building. Manifest.AR is also planning to extend their explorations with exhibits within the Liverpool community.

Pappenheimer and Manifest.AR were awarded the $32,000 grant for artists’ fees, production costs and travel costs while continuing research and production of this proposal.

Projects they are proposing are visualized in these pictures:

“FACT Sky Museum,” a virtual museum of skywriting created by FACT museum visitors, by Will Pappenheimer: http://manifestarblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/fact-sky-museum2.jpg

“Biomer Skelters,”  a virtual jungle forest generator, Will Pappenheimer and Tamiko Thiel: http://manifestarblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/forrestation-viz-1.jpg

About Will Pappenheimer

Will Pappenheimer is an artist and professor at Pace University in New York as well as a founding member of the Manifest.AR collective. His work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions nationally and internationally. One notable installation was his public mood ring in Tampa, FL, a combined Internet and spatial piece of artwork which allowed a large online community to display the emotional condition of public opinion and news stories during Super Bowl 2009 in colors in a public sculpture. His grants include an NEA Artist Fellowship; Traveling Scholars Award from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Turbulence.org; Rhizome.org at the New Museum; and a large scale public network sculpture for the City of Tampa. His work with Manifest.AR has been reviewed in a variety of media, including New York Times, the Boston Globe, WIRED, NY Arts International, Art US, and MSNBC.com. For a complete list of his recent projects visit http://www.willpap-projects.com.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Mid Hudson News: Pace Study of Potential Dutchess Fire Department Consolidation Complete

The results of a study by Pace University exploring the feasibility of consolidation of the Fairview Fire District with five other departments in Dutchess County will be released next week.

From Mid-Hudson News:

The results of a study by Pace University exploring the feasibility of enhancing cooperation or consolidation of services provided by the Fairview Fire District in the towns of Poughkeepsie and Hyde Park with five other departments in Dutchess County will be released next week.

A state grant funded the study conducted by the Michaelian Institute at Pace will not make any recommendations, but rather provide findings, said principal investigator Michael Genito.

Read more here.

Patch.com: Pace Students Head to International Mobile Challenge

Two Pace students are heading to South Africa to showcase their Android app.

Two Pace students are heading to South Africa to showcase their Android app. Patch.com ran the story on the Pace team’s success at the mobile challenge in Barcelona and their invitation to compete in South Africa.

Read the full story on Patch.com.

Alzheimer’s Reading Room: Love, Loss and Laughter – Seeing Alzheimer’s Differently, Photo Exhibit Redefines Alzheimer’s

The Alzheimer’s Reading Room, a prominent blog on the subject, listed the upcoming Pace exhibition of “84 poignant photographs demonstrating a new global approach to caring for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias sharply disputing the stereotype of dementia patients as ’empty shells.'”

The Alzheimer’s Reading Room, a prominent blog on the subject, listed the upcoming Pace exhibition of “84 poignant photographs demonstrating a new global approach to caring for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias sharply disputing the stereotype of dementia patients as ’empty shells.'” The listing also mentioned the symposium on April 25.
The exhibition in Schimmel’ s lobby gallery through April 28 of 84 photographs by Cathy Greenblat, PhD, showing a positive approach to Alzheimer’s care in seven countries, was a “critic’s pick” in online Time Out New York. The related book has been positively reviewed in The New Scientist (UK), on Amazon.com (seven times), in the Bookviews’ blog, and twice on the influential blog Alzheimer’s Reading Room.
From the Alzheimer’s Reading Room:
“If you live anywhere near New York City you might want to consider trekking up to the city to see the, Love, Loss, and Laughter: Seeing Alzheimer’s Differently Photo Exhibition. The photo exhibit is being held at the Pace University Schimmel Center. The center is located at 3 Spruce St. between Park Row and Gold Street, just south of the Brooklyn Bridge and east of City Hall. The exhibition is free and open to the public Wednesday through Saturday, 12 to 7 pm, from March 14 through April 28.

You might want to wait until April 25th. On that date, you can get to see the photo exhibit and a symposium about reducing the stigma of Alzheimer’s and related diseases.

The photographer and author, Cathy Greenblat, PhD, is a sociologist who arguably is the world’s leading documentarian of this new approach to Alzheimer’s care.”

Read more at the Alzheimer’s Reading Room.

Time Out New York also listed the photo exhibition here. Read other coverage/listings from Seven Ponds blog and DowntownNY.com.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University researchers recognized for development of first new drug for “sleeping sickness” in 30 years

There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and Nigel Yarlett, PhD, chair of chemistry and physical sciences in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative Project of the Year 2011 Award given to Pace professors

NEW YORK, NY, March 12, 2012 – There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to biology professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and chemistry professor Nigel Yarlett, PhD, and their undergraduate students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

The professors’ work out of Haskins Laboratories at Pace has been awarded the Project of the Year 2011 Award by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) for their role in the development of the first new drug to go to clinical trial and the first new treatment for sleeping sickness since 1980. The award was given jointly to Scynexis Inc. of Research Triangle Park, NC, which synthesized the compounds, and Pace University which did initial testing in vivo. Several Pace chemistry and biology students assisted in animal testing of the drug, providing them with hands-on experience in drug development from the bench to in vivo studies. Haskins Labs identified 15 compounds that may work in humans.

Bacchi and Yarlett have devoted their careers to neglected diseases. The research of Haskins Labs on compounds to treat sleeping sickness was written about in The New York Times in 1985 and 2008. In one article the disease was called “fearsome but nearly forgotten because its victims are poor and obscure.” In another article one drug, eflornithine, the trademark name for DFMO discovered in 1980 at Pace, is mentioned saying it is a “miracle” the drug is available. The drug is still used as a first line clinical treatment for sleeping sickness.

About 150,000 people contract sleeping sickness each year, but 50 million people in 36 countries live in areas where they are at risk. During recent epidemics in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, and Southern Sudan, prevalence has been as high as 50 percent. In some communities with high prevalence, the death rate from African sleeping sickness has exceeded that of HIV/AIDS. Nevertheless, there is no profit in it. Without outside funding and incentives, drug companies are not interested in developing treatments for such orphan diseases.

 

With funding from DNDi, which receives support from the Gates Foundation, the drug has been able to go to clinical trials.  One quarter of a million dollars a year is going to support this research at Pace.

The researchers have identified a new series of compounds which are effective in curing mice and are now being tested on larger mammals. Phase I clinical toxicity studies are beginning on humans in France on one compound, SCYX7158. Volunteers who are not infected take the drug to see if humans can tolerate it and are monitored closely for side effects. If these studies are successful, this compound will go to Phase II clinical trials later this year in African villages with infected inhabitants who are cut off from most medical access.

“For the people living in these villages, this sort of sickness is just a way of life,” said Yarlett.

“Sleeping sickness” has been called by The New York Times “too benign a nickname” for human African trypanosomiasis, which is caused by a protozoan. The disease is characterized by two distinct stages, early stage or blood stream infection and late stage disease of the central nervous system.  When the brain is affected, victims hallucinate and their behavior becomes erratic and sometimes violent. Victims may chase people with machetes, throw themselves into latrines and scream with pain at the touch of water. Near the end of the disease, they lapse into a state of listlessness followed by coma and death.

The Haskins Laboratories, which have been at Pace since 1970, have a long legacy of researching possible cures for diseases that are out of the public spotlight. “We work on things that aren’t stylish—not in vogue. And consequentially, things that aren’t typically funded to a great extent,” said Yarlett.

“Drugs were developed between 1920 and 1950 to treat sleeping sickness, but some of these drugs had an arsenic base and were toxic,” Yarlett said. “For about 10% of those being treated with these drugs, death occurred more quickly than it would have if they hadn’t been treated. These are the first new drugs developed to treat sleeping sickness in 30 years. We’re very excited.”

Workers at Haskins Labs are also developing a first line of treatment for a more global issue—cryptosporidiosis, a waterborne illness that causes chronic diarrhea. Its major impact has been among those with weakened immune systems, including those who are HIV positive, receiving cancer treatments, or those that have undergone organ transplants.

“Cryptosporidosis is one of the major causes of death in HIV positive people and currently there is nothing available to treat it,” Yarlett said.

Read the press release from DNDi here.

About Haskins Labs

The Haskins Laboratories was founded in 1935 at General Electrical and Union College by four young and innovative scientists, one of whom became its namesake, Caryl Haskins, a physicist and geneticist. In 1970 it split into two divisions, the Microbiology Division, under Seymour Hutner (one of the original scientists) affiliated with Pace University, and the Speech Recognition and Cognition Division affiliated with Yale University. It is funded by a number of sources, including the National Institutes of Health (in collaboration with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas), Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), and Genzyme Corp and works in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies Scynexis and Anacor.

For more information about the work being done at the Haskins Laboratories, click here.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

White Plains Patch: Pace Professor Publishes Newest CD ‘Earthdance Anthology’

Pace professor Evan Pritchard and his native American music were featured in the White Plains Patch.

Pace environmental studies professor Evan Pritchard has published his latest CD, a 12-track collection entitled ‘Earthdance Anthology’. Pritchard and his music were featured in the White Plains Patch.

From the article:

“Evan Pritchard’s second grade teacher asked whether he wanted to be a fireman, policeman or a doctor when he grew up—his answer: a Renaissance man.

Though the teacher told the now 56-year-old Pace University professor that this was no longer possible—he simply told her it was, and he would prove it.

“I continue to be interested in a whole lot of things and how they fit together,” said Pritchard, who has taught at both the Pleasantville and White Plains campuses.

“I knew that’s what I wanted to do—look at the whole picture.”

In addition to being a professor of Native American studies, world religion and philosophy—Pritchard, who has Mi’kmaq Native American and Celtic blood, is a musician, composer, poet, author and artist.”

The Poughkeepsie resident’s latest work—a 12-track album titled “ Earthdance Anthology,” recorded at Robert Jackson AIF Music Productions’ studio in Mamaroneck, combines all of these talents.

For video, additional photos, and to read the full article, click here.

NEWS RELEASE: Nominees for the 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Awards include Two Pace Professors

Two Pace professors, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick authors of Scripting Hitchcock (Illinois UP, 2011), are up for Edgar Awards.

Two Pace professors, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick authors of Scripting Hitchcock (Illinois UP, 2011), are up for Edgar Awards. Mystery Writers of America announced its nominees for the 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2011. The Edgar® Awards will be presented to the winners at their 66th Gala Banquet, April 26, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, New York City.

Scripting Hitchcock explores the collaborative process between Alfred Hitchcock and the screenwriters he hired to write the scripts for three of his greatest films: Psycho, The Birds, and Marnie. Drawing from extensive interviews with these screenwriters—Joseph Stefano, Evan Hunter, and Jay Presson Allen– and other film technicians who worked for Hitchcock, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick illustrate how much of the filmmaking process took place not on the set but in the adaptation of the sources, the mutual creation of plot and characters by the director and the writers, and the various revisions of the screenplays of the films. This volume gives due credit to the writers who gave narrative form to Hitchcock’s cinematic vision.

Read the press release here.

 

MEDIA ALERT/INSIDE TRACK DISCUSSION, OCT 25 at 7 PM – “Creative Destruction: Innovation in America and China” with Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman and Management Consultant/Best-Selling Author Richard Foster

Austrian economist Joseph Schumpeter’s “gales of creative destruction” are blowing and many companies are being taken under by this storm. Richard Foster shares his view on how the changing economy of China will determine which U.S. businesses will survive and prosper, and which ones will wither and die.

Get the INSIDE TRACK on how the changing economy of China will determine which U.S. businesses will survive and prosper … and which ones will wither and die.

PACE UNIVERSITY MEDIA EVENT ALERT

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25 at 7:00 PM, NEW YORK CITY CAMPUS

“CREATIVE DESTRUCTION: INNOVATION IN AMERICA AND CHINA”

An engaging, thought-provoking discussion with Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman and Leading Management Consultant, Best-Selling Author and “Wizard of Innovation” Richard Foster

When: Tuesday, October 25, 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM.

Where: Pace University, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street, New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

Who:  Richard Foster is an emeritus director of McKinsey & Company, where he founded the technology and innovation practice, the health care practice, and the private equity practice, and led McKinsey’s worldwide knowledge development. He currently advises health care service and technology companies on how to capitalize on disruptive innovation. He has written two bestselling books: Innovation: The Attacker’s Advantage and Creative Destruction.

Stephen J. Friedman became president of Pace University on June 4, 2007. Friedman is a former senior partner at Debevoise & Plimpton LLC, commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission, deputy assistant secretary of the Treasury, executive vice president at The Equitable Companies Incorporated and the E.F. Hutton Group Inc., and U.S. Supreme Court law clerk. Friedman served for three years as dean of Pace University School of Law prior to being named president by the Pace University Board of Trustees.

What is Creative Destruction? The automobile cost blacksmiths their jobs; personal computers replaced the typewriter. The Internet has seriously impacted the publishing, music and film industries. Based on an “endless cycle of innovation” concept first popularized by economist Joseph Alois Schumpeter, creative destruction suggests that companies can outperform capital markets and maintain their leadership positions only if they creatively and continuously reconstruct themselves. In doing so, they can stay ahead of the upstart challengers constantly waiting in the wings.

About Inside Track with President Stephen J. Friedman: A forum that brings the world’s most renowned leaders to Pace University to inspire, motivate and provide deeper insight into social, political, economic and environmental issues that affect us all.

RSVP: The event is free and open to the public, as well as to the Pace community.  Please register in advance online at www.pace.edu/insidetrack

Pace Media Contact: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172

NEWS RELEASE: Psychology Professor Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, PsyD, Talks “Teen” in New Book “Teenage as a Second Language”

Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder has a doctorate in school/clinical child psychology from Pace University. She is the Director of an inpatient adolescent unit at Four Winds Hospital in Katonah, New York. She is an adjunct professor at Pace University and maintains a private practice in New York. She is also the co-creator of www.TalkingTeenage.com an interactive website for parents of teens.

Posted in partnership with Adams Media:

TEENAGE AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual

Barbara R. Greenberg, PhD

And Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, PsyD

What’s the story?

You wake up one day and your cheerful, friendly kid has morphed into a sarcastic, sullen adolescent who can’t—or won’t—talk to you.  Now what? Forget Spanish, its time to learn a second language and that language is teen.

Enter TEENAGE AS A SECOND LANGUAGE:  A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual (Adams Media, a division of F+W Media; November) by Barbara R. Greenberg, PhD and Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, PsyD—the only book on the market to reveal concrete strategies any parent can use to maintain good communication, healthy interaction, and strong connections to their teens.

What does it mean for your audience?

Based on the latest research, this book works as a Rosetta Stone to help parents hear what their teens are really saying—one dialogue at a time.  Readers will learn how to:

  • Let their teens help set the rules—and the consequences for breaking them
  • Put honesty above all else
  • Realize that “me, me, me!” is actually age-appropriate behavior
  • Try not to criticize, judge, or become angry

Who are the authors?

Barbara R. Greenberg has a doctorate in clinical psychology from SUNY at Stony Brook. She maintains a full-time private practice in Connecticut where she serves as the Adolescent Consultant for Silver Hill Hospital in New Canaan, Connecticut. She is also the co-creator of www.TalkingTeenage.com an interactive website for parents of teens.

Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder has a doctorate in school/clinical child psychology from Pace University. She is the Director of an inpatient adolescent unit at Four Winds Hospital in Katonah, New York. She is an adjunct professor at Pace University and maintains a private practice in New York. She is also the co-creator of www.TalkingTeenage.com an interactive website for parents of teens.

For more information, please contact Beth Gissinger at 508/427-6757 or beth.gissinger@fwmedia.com

www.adamsmedia.com

www.talkingteenage.com