LatinTRENDS Magazine: 2011 Annual Latino Trendsetter Awards Honor Jorge Luis Cachiero for Outstanding Achievements and Leadership in the Hispanic Community

The 10th Annual Latino Trendsetter Awards will honor Jorge Luis Cachiero, Chairman of the Dyson College of Arts & Sciences Performing Arts Department of Pace University, in a November 29 ceremony hosted by Jorge Ramos of Telemundo in New York City. Produced by LatinTRENDS Magazine, the annual awards celebrate excellence and recognizes groundbreaking leaders in business, education, entertainment, art, health, community service, and more.

Jorge Luis Cacheiro, Chairman of the Dyson College of Arts & Sciences Performing Arts Department, has been a leading university theater innovator for almost two decades.

As a director, Cacheiro has a long history of working on new plays. He has directed world, U.S. and west coast premieres of plays by such prominent playwrights as Harry Kondoleon, David Lindsay-Abaire, Eduardo Machado and Luis Santeiro, in theaters ranging from New York Theater Workshop, Circle Repertory, INTAR in New York, Echo Theater in Los Angeles and the Magic Theater in San Francisco.

For the past ten years, Cacheiro has also focused on creating cultural bridges between the United States and his native Cuba. The work includes pursuing academic agreements between Cuba’s Institute of Superior Arts and American universities, bringing Cuban theater artists to the U.S., and most recently directing in Havana, Cuba. In 2010, with the Latin American premiere of Jorge Cortinas’ Canto del Pozo Ciego, Cacheiro became the first American director invited to lead a Cuban company. TCG and the Andrew Mellon Foundation generously supported this production. He returns to direct again in Havana in 2013.

On November 29 in New York City, he will be celebrated at the 10th Annual Latino Trendsetter Awards and scholarship gala for his leadership in the Hispanic community along with 17 other notable Latino achievers. Click here to learn more about Cachiero’s fellow honorees.

A personal profile, also appearing on LatinTRENDS “Meet the Trendsetters” website, is below.

Q & A

Where were you born & raised?
I was born in Havana, left at 4, and grew up in Queens NY.

Share some memories of your childhood.
There are many memories but two very strong memories as a
young boy are leaving Cuba and a lot of family I never saw again,
and then entering the American school system as a young boy not
speaking a word of English. Shock, shock, shock. You develop
tough skin quick.

What is some of your favorite music?
Favorite music – is electric blues. I love it’s soul and it’s wail!
Favorite artists — so, so many— including Beny More (can’t do the
accent on this keyboard), Bob Dylan, Billie Holiday, Derek and the
Dominoes, Beatles, Stones, Sinatra.

What does being Latino mean to you?
Latino – it’s a belief and pride in both our culture and in our case,
our unique American experience. We have all had to climb our
own mountains to get here, but we can never forget who came
before us or who will come after. Much of my work in Cuba is about this, it supersedes politics which
are always temporary compared to the human spirit – people who are forever.

As an honoree, what do you hope to accomplish?
Being a trendsetter winner is an honor and most importantly
an affirmation of my path, of opening dialogue among our
community and not being afraid to think BIG.

What advice would you give a young Latino looking to enter your field?
Follow your heart and protect your dream. There will always be
obstacles but they are just there to make you stronger.


NEWS RELEASE: Head of New Doctoral Program at Pace Nursing School Chosen as Fellow of New York Academy of Medicine

Nursing professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, chair of graduate studies and director of the recently-developed doctor of nursing practice (DNP) program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions, will be inducted as a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM). (Left: Singleton).

Joanne Singleton recognized for contributions to urban health

NEW YORK, NY, November 3, 2011 – Nursing professor Joanne Singleton, PhD, chair of graduate studies and director of the recently-developed doctor of nursing practice (DNP) program at Pace University’s College of Health Professions, will be inducted as a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM), one of the nation’s oldest medical academies.

Singleton will join an elite group of approximately 3,000 fellows, including doctors, nurses and health care administrators, who are rigorously selected for a combination of certification in a health care specialty, scholarship, and active involvement in professional and community change. The Academy, founded in 1847, is an effective advocate in public health reform and a major center for health education.

“Joanne significantly contributes to urban health through her own work and the extension of her work through that of her students,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, RN, FAAN, the former dean of Pace’s nursing school who now is the University’s Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. “Her teaching and mentoring have helped prepare well over a thousand family nurse practitioners through Pace’s master’s degree program, and now she is bringing her gifts to students in a Doctor of Nursing Practice degree program that she played a significant role in developing.” Feldman added that Singleton’s “expertise in primary health care, cultural competence and evidence-based practice” are particularly outstanding.

 

Contributions to Teaching

 

Nearly 10 years ago, Singleton led Pace faculty members in revising Pace’s Family Nurse Practitioner curriculum to use an evidence-based practice (EBP) framework. The curriculum includes innovative practice assignments to help students learn all aspects of EBP and a “Put Prevention into Practice” assignment she developed that each student completes in clinical rotations.

Recently, Singleton was one of the faculty members who led development of Pace’s Doctor of Nursing Practice curriculum including the key contemporary health-care concepts of EBP, cultural competence, and primary  care and developed an innovative EBP project strategy for the capstone. She also strengthened mentoring partnerships with clinical agencies like Mt. Sinai, Montefiore, HHC-Elmhurst Hospital Center, the Visiting Nurse Services of New York and Northern Westchester Hospital.

Enhancing nurses’ competence with patients from varying cultures is particularly important at Pace, where more than 50 percent of DNP students come from diverse backgrounds. Singleton has enhanced faculty and student development in this area, and has begun to achieve another of her aims, increasing diversity among the graduate clinical faculty by hiring outstanding graduates of Pace’s DNP program.

Involvement in Professional Organizations

Singleton has been an active member of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) since 1994. In addition to her participation on the NONPF research committee, she participated in work on interdisciplinary education and practice that lead to an international presentation and publication. She also served on the Expert Advisory Panel to the National State Boards of Nursing on National Guidelines for Pharmacology Curriculum for Family Nurse Practitioner.

Contributions to research and publications

Singleton has distinguished herself with numerous peer reviewed publications. For instance, she led a faculty team in a systematic review of first line smoking cessation interventions which lead to interdisciplinary research on the role of gender and ethnicity in these activities.

Other awards, honors, and activities

Singleton has been a registered nurse for over 30 years. In 1994, she completed her post-doctoral nurse practitioner education in family practice and extended her practice to the preparation of nurse practitioners. Before joining Pace in 1996, she developed and directed the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Program at SUNY-Downstate, where she remains an Associate Professor and voluntary primary care provider in the School of Medicine’s Department of Family Practice. Singleton previously worked in clinical supervision and nurse recruitment and retention at The Mt. Sinai Medical Center, Montefiore Medical Center, and Beth Abraham Hospital, and as a staff nurse at The Hospital of Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

During her career at SUNY Brooklyn, Singleton was recognized for outstanding teaching at the State University of New York with the Chancellor’s Award for Teaching Excellence. Last year she was again recognized for teaching excellence with Pace’s first Dean’s Outstanding Teaching Award. This year she received the Pace University Lienhard School of Nursing Dean’s Outstanding Research/Scholarship Award.

Singleton is an active member of Sigma Theta Tau international. She was inducted as a Fellow into the National Academies of Practice in 2001, and actively participates to inform health policy. Since 2006, at Mt. Sinai she has been a consultant, curriculum committee member, and reviewer for the PhD, and Career Development awards of the Institute for Translational Research, Education & Experimental Therapeutics.

Community service

Singleton provides consultation and presentations on health related topics to New York City Public Schools. She led an anaphylaxis awareness program at P.S. 8 in Brooklyn, assembling a volunteer interdisciplinary team of health professionals to train all teachers and staff in recognition and response, including Epi-pen administration, and developed and ran drills which included the local FDNY as first responders.

“Joanne blazes new paths in scholarship directed at the elimination of health disparities and the expansion of cultural competence, and she is truly motivated by societal benefit rather than personal gain,” said Gerrie Colombraro, RN, PhD, interim dean of the College of Health Professions at Pace. “Her commitment to evidenced-based practice, cultural competence, and primary healthcare is reflected in her leadership activities. Her experience and expertise in interdisciplinary practice and new models of care delivery will allow her to continue to make significant contributions to addressing the health challenges of urban populations.”

Singleton will be inducted into the Academy at a dinner honoring new fellows and members on Wednesday, November 9 beginning at 5:00pm at The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029. http://www.nyam.org/events/2011/2011-11-09.html

About Fellowship in the New York Academy of Medicine

Election to Fellowship in the Academy is limited to those who embody the highest levels of achievement and reflects a rigorous nomination and review process. Criteria for Fellowship include certification by a specialty board, active involvement in medical or professional organizations and active participation in the health-related affairs of the community unrelated to income-producing work. Other considerations include outstanding contributions in medical services, health or science policy, teaching programs in a hospital, medical school, or other academic institution, research and/or publication of scholarly articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

About the Pace College of Health Professions

The College of Health Professions was established in 2010 in an effort to integrate the broad range of health science majors at Pace University. The College is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies Program. The College’s vision is innovative leadership in education, practice, and scholarship for the health professions, and its mission is to educate and challenge students for the health professions to be innovators and leaders who will
positively impact global health care.

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

The Journal News: Communication Award Given | LoHud.com

The Journal News wrote about Pace senior fellow Andrew Revkin’s communication award from the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering and Institute of Medicine.

Andrew Revkin, a science journalist who is a senior fellow for environmental understanding at Pace University and writes the Dot Earth blog for The New York Times, has become the first two-time winner of the Communication Award bestowed by the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering and Institute of Medicine. The award, which includes a $20,000 check, recognizes excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering and medicine to the general public.

Community news | The Journal News | LoHud.com.

Read the news release here.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Women’s Basketball Receives Service Award at Tunnel to Towers Run

The Pace Women’s basketball team was honored this past Sunday at the Ninth Annual Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Run. Head Coach Carrie Seymour accepted the Ed Klingele Memorial Award for outstanding volunteer service.

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. –  The Pace Women’s basketball team was honored this past Sunday at the Ninth Annual Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Run. Head Coach Carrie Seymour accepted the Ed Klingele Memorial Award for outstanding volunteer service.

The run is designed so participants can run or walk in the footsteps of Stephen Siller, a firefighter who lost his life on 9/11 after making a heroic journey to the towers. He was on his way to help the morning of September 11th when his truck was stopped at the Battery Tunnel. With sixty pounds of gear strapped on his back, he ran through the tunnel in hopes of meeting up with his company at the World Trade Center. Runners and walkers retrace his very steps every year at this event.

Pace basketball is happy to support the foundation whose mission is to “follow Stephen’s footsteps through support of children who have lost a parent, firefighters, and military who have been seriously injured and sacrifice their quality of life in the line of duty.”

The team has been involved with the event since 2002, and has devoted the last Sunday of September to volunteering at the event, or in some cases participating in the run itself. Whether it is running, walking, or volunteering, the team gets together and heads down to the city to be a part of this great cause.

Pace basketball has had a close connection to the Siller’s, as Stephen’s brother Frank Siller coached several Pace players during their AAU days on the Staten Island Rebels. Frank has been a close friend and supporter of the program for years.

The Setters are honored to be recognized by the Stephen Siller Foundation and will continue to be proud supporters.

Pace tip-offs it regular season on Sunday, November 13 as they will open the 2011-12 season with a road game against the University of Bridgeport at 6 pm.

US News and World Report: 10 National Universities Producing the Most Interns

Pace University is one of the top ten schools in the U.S. for internship placement according to U.S. News and World Report.

Pace University is one of the top ten schools in the U.S. for internship placement according to U.S. News and World Report.

The U.S. News Short List, separate from their overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas.

President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness announced commitments from 45 industry leaders—including American Express, AT&T, Boeing, Dell, Facebook, General Electric, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Mastercard, Sprint Nextel​, Sunoco, and Xerox—to double available engineering internships in August. The more than 6,000 new internships, according to the council, will be part of an effort to address a shortage of engineers in the country by providing “opportunities for hands-on, technical job experience.”

With an extremely competitive job market facing them when they graduate, engineering majors—as well as  students in a variety of other areas of study—choose to supplement their coursework with internships, which give them an opportunity to get out of the classroom and into real-life work situations.

At the 416 schools that provided internship data to U.S. News, 37.6 percent of 2010 graduates participated in internships as undergraduate students, on average. Of the graduating seniors at the 59 national universities that provided data, an average of 30.4 percent had internship experience.

U.S. News surveyed more than 1,800 colleges and universities for our 2011 survey of undergraduate programs.

10 National Universities Producing the Most Interns – US News and World Report.

NEWS RELEASE: New York Times Dot Earth Blog Earns a Second National Communication Award for Pace University Senior Fellow Andrew Revkin

Andrew Revkin, the noted science journalist who is now a Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University and writes the “Dot Earth” blog for The New York Times, has become the first two-time winner of the Communication Award bestowed jointly by the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine.

Photo editors: Photos of Revkin available upon request.

‘DOT EARTH’ BLOG EARNS A SECOND NATIONAL COMMUNICATION AWARD FOR PACE UNIVERSITY SENIOR FELLOW AND NEW YORK TIMES BLOGGER ANDREW REVKIN

Recognized for creating “pioneering social media” about climate and sustainability with “worldwide readership and impact”

NEW YORK, NY, September 15, 2011 – Andrew Revkin, the noted science journalist who is now a Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University and writes the “Dot Earth” blog for The New York Times, has become the first two-time winner of the Communication Award bestowed jointly by the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine.

The award is arguably the most prestigious award in science journalism, coming from the nation’s preeminent scientific advisory organizations (the jury is journalists and educators) and includes a $20,000 check. It recognizes “excellence in reporting and communicating science, engineering, and medicine to the general public.”

Revkin is one of four winners. The others are Rebecca Skloot, for her book “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” (Crown Books, a division of Random House) about ethical issues in science; the television producer Alexa Elliott and a production team at South Florida public television station WPBT2, for “Changing Seas: Sentinels of the Seas” about bottlenose dolphins; and Amy Harmon, a national correspondent for The New York Times, for “Cancer,” about clinical drug trials. More than 300 print, broadcast, and Internet entries published or aired in 2010 were submitted for consideration.

Revkin is the first repeat winner in the history of the awards –he also won in the inaugural year, in the magazine and newspapers category, for his coverage of the environment and climate change. This year he won the online category for Dot Earth coverage of a similar topic, “climate and sustainability.”

The citation recognizes Revkin’s “pioneering” use of social media and stresses his “worldwide” readership and influence.

After four years in existence, Dot Earth is now read by millions of people in more than 200 countries from Brazil to China. Revkin has over 26,000 followers on Twitter (@revkin); he maxed out his allotment on Facebook at 5,000 friends a while back.

Blogging as a class assignment

Revkin brings his style of communicating to his students at Pace.

This fall he has launched a new graduate course called “Blogging a Better Planet.” He says his students will explore how the blogosphere and World Wide Web can, positively, “build a brand, create a collaborative globe-spanning community, challenge traditional media, or spark the kinds of innovations and relationship that could make the world a better place.” However, he also will make sure they learn “how blogs can create insular ideological bubbles, foment hatred, and spread myths and falsehoods.”

Starting this week, anyone can track Wednesday night class discussions and related issues by searching for the hashtag #paceblog on Twitter.

His teaching goal echoes his own career: “They will learn how to be online communication innovators tipping the balance toward progress.”

Limbaugh rant

In his blog, Revkin has explored gaming as a path to learning and “has been incredibly successful at encouraging copious, high-quality commenting and debate on the site,” according to The Columbia Journalism review. He invites comments on imagined private conversations by world leaders, encourages readers to post video greetings, and came up with a novel way of annotating speeches and documents that lets readers respond to particular lines they find appealing or problematic. He calls himself “a selfish blogger,” using the site “to sift for insights and ideas as much as I offer my own.”

The most famous reaction to Dot Earth, prompted by his posts on population control in 2009, was Rush Limbaugh’s half-serious suggestion that Revkin kill himself to help save the earth. (The subsequent NPR report included the Limbaugh rant; Revkin blogged about the incident and asked Limbaugh for an apology to his wife and sons.)

Revkin says that in an online environment “filled with blogs that are essentially megaphones,” he tries to avoid creating a “comfort zone” for people reinforcing their own views and instead aims to provide “more like a ‘discomfort zone’ dealing with disquieting realities behind substantial global challenges, and trying (not always successfully) to foster constructive discourse on tough questions.”

Most of the blog is informed reporting. During negotiations in Cancun last December, Revkin found an error in a climate-treaty draft document. It was fixed once he brought it to the attention of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – and his blog audience.

Through more than 1,600 posts, his coverage has ranged from in-depth examination of issues like warming and genetically modified crops to an offbeat personal exploration of his own dependence on fossil fuels (in a video report following a blizzard and blackout titled “living the imposed low-carbon life.”)

Infinite aspirations, finite planet

For nearly four years, first while a news reporter and, since he moved to Pace in early 2010, as an Op-Ed contributor, Revkin says he has used the blog to probe one question– “How do we fit humanity’s infinite aspirations on a finite planet?”

From 1995 through 2009, Revkin covered the environment for The New York Times. While the media largely ignored the climate story until the last several years, Revkin spent more than 20 years immersed in the subject, producing more than 500 magazine and newspaper stories, two books, a prize-winning Discovery-Times documentary, “Arctic Rush,” and hundreds of posts on his blog. His reporting on the political struggles over climate policy consistently broke stories. His exclusive exposé of efforts by political operatives to rewrite government climate reports in the White House and prevent NASA scientists from conveying their views on warming were quickly followed by the resignations of two presidential appointees.

Award ceremony and funding

Revkin and the other award winners will be honored during a ceremony on Oct. 14 at the National Academies’ Keck Center in Washington, D.C.

The awards have been supported since 2003 by the W.M. Keck Foundation as part of the Keck Futures Initiative to encourage interdisciplinary research, a program funded by a 15-year, $40 million grant from the foundation. Nominations for the 2012 Communication Awards will be accepted beginning Jan. 10, 2012, for work published or broadcast in 2011. More information about the National Academies Futures Initiative and the Communication Awards is at www.keckfutures.org, and about the W.M. Keck Foundation at www.wmkeck.org.

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Awarded Military Friendly School Title from G.I. Jobs Magazine

G.I. Jobs, the premier magazine for military personnel transitioning into civilian life, has awarded Pace University the designation of Military Friendly School. The 2012 Military Friendly Schools list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members and veterans as students.

NEW YORK, NY – G.I. Jobs, the premier magazine for military personnel transitioning into civilian life, has awarded Pace University the designation of Military Friendly School. The 2012 Military Friendly Schools list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members and veterans as students.

The 1,518 colleges, universities and trade schools on this year’s list prioritize the recruitment of students with military experience. These schools offer scholarships and discounts, veterans’ clubs, full-time staff, military credit and other services to those who served. The 2012 list of Military Friendly Schools ® was compiled through extensive research and a data driven survey of more than 8,000 schools nationwide.

To help veterans find the right school, G.I. Jobs surveyed student veterans. The feedback helps prospective military students learn about the veteran experience at institutions based on peer reviews from current students.

Student veteran survey feedback can be viewed at www.militaryfriendlyschools.com/2012 list.

A newly redesigned website, found at www.militaryfriendlyschools.com, features the list, interactive tools and search functionality to assist military veterans with their school decisions.

Service members and veterans can meet student veterans from the various schools virtually on the web site to discuss personal school decisions and the transition from a military to an academic environment.

Methodology, criteria and weighting for the list were developed with the assistance of an Academic Advisory Board (AAB) consisting of educators from schools across the country.  A full list of board members can be found at http://militaryfriendlyschools.com/Article/advisory-board/.

ABOUT G.I. Jobs
G.I. Jobs (www.gijobs.com) is published by Victory Media, a veteran-owned business which also publishes The Guide to Military Friendly Schools, Military Spouse and Vetrepreneur magazines and annually rates the nation’s “Military Friendly Employers,” “Military Spouse Friendly Employers” and “Best Corporations for Veteran-Owned Businesses.

NEWS RELEASE: Princeton Review Names Pace University a “Best in Northeast”

Pace University is one of the best colleges in the Northeast, and in the top quarter of four year colleges in the US, according to the nationally known education services company, The Princeton Review. Pace is one of 220 Northeast institutions the Review recommends in its website feature, “2012 Best Colleges: Region by Region,” posted this month on www.PrincetonReview.com.

“For students looking to get their feet wet in the real world, the Pace experience couldn’t be better.”

NEW YORK, NY, August 5, 2011 – Pace University is one of the best colleges in the Northeast, and in the top quarter of four year colleges in the US, according to the nationally known education services company, The Princeton Review. Pace is one of 220 Northeast institutions the Review recommends in its website feature, “2012 Best Colleges: Region by Region,” posted this month on www.PrincetonReview.com.

Nationally, the 629 colleges named regional bests constitute about 25 percent of the country’s 2,500 four-year institutions.

The Review says Pace reflects “an emphasis on career-building and practical education…. For students looking to get their feet wet in the real world, the Pace experience couldn’t be better.”

“The opportunities in New York City are endless,” adds an anonymous student the Review quotes; another says the school’s “co-op department is amazingly good at finding jobs and internships” for students and recent grads.”

In the classroom, a student told the Review, professors “do well integrating their real-world experience into their lessons and encourage discussion from the students.” In many departments, “especially the well-loved theater major,” students say instructors are “absolutely phenomenal in connecting with students,” and many professors “provide amazing opportunities that lead to building a resume as well as a future job.”

Choice based on academic excellence

Explaining the selection process, Robert Franek, Princeton Review’s Senior Vice President and Publisher said, “We chose Pace and the other institutions we name as ‘regional best’ colleges mainly for excellence in academic programs.”

The Princeton Review, headquartered in Framingham, MA with editorial offices in New York City and test preparation locations across the country and abroad, is not affiliated with Princeton University and is not a magazine. www.PrincetonReview.com.

About Pace University: For 105 years, Pace has offered an immersive education, weaving class and career in unexpected ways and leveraging the unique resource of the New York metropolitan area to prepare students for leadership across the professions and around the globe. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook | Twitter | Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter:  NYC | PLV

 Media Contact for Pace University: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Media Contacts for The Princeton Review: Joseph Iovino, 888-865-7737 ext 5678 or Jeanne Krier, 212-539-1350

MidHudsonNews.com: “Cronin awarded Jefferson Gold Medal”

John Cronin has been a part of the Hudson River environmental movement since 1973 when he started with the Clearwater organization. He reflects how Clearwater founder Pete Seeger recruited him as a volunteer.

John Cronin is a senior fellow at Pace University and executive director of the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries.

He can also add another title to his resume, a recipient of the Jefferson Award, named for Thomas Jefferson and founded by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis as a “Noble Prize for public service.”

Cronin was described by the Jefferson Awards Board of Selectors as “Hero for the Planet [and] equal parts detective, scientist and public advocate.” The board said his efforts “have inspired a legacy of programs across the globe, fighting pollution on six continents.”

The MidHudsonNews reports Pace University President Stephen Friedman nominated Cronin for the award, for which Cronin said he was both humbled and honored.

Poughkeepsie Journal: “Hudson River steward receives Jefferson Award”

Steward of the Hudson River and water quality, John Cronin, received a 2011 Jefferson Award for his decades of public service.

John Cronin, a resident of Cold Spring, is known for his 17 years at environmental group Riverkeeper, and is the director and CEO of Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries. He is also a Pace University senior fellow.

At the Beacon Institute, Cronin directs a program that monitors rivers and estuaries using a network of sensors and robotics.

He lectures on the environment, co-authored “The Riverkeepers” with Robert F. Kennedy Jr., and wrote and co-produced the film “The Last Rivermen.”

Cronin told the Poughkeepsie Journal that he credited folksinger Pete Seeger and Pace University as his sources of inspiration.