ArtDaily.org: Pace University art professor awarded grant to research link between augmented reality and viewer response

Art Daily ran the press release on Pace art professor Will Pappenheimer’s recent grant award to explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information.

Art Daily and Computer Graphics World ran stories on Pace art professor Will Pappenheimer’s recent grant award.

From ArtDaily.org:

Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’ Invisible ARtaffects will explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information. The goal is for the exhibitions to create an experience of virtual art which is responsive to viewers. The virtual affects the real, which in turn affects the virtual. Researchers will include artists from Manifest.AR, the ARtSENSE Consortium of European organizations, and FACT working in collaboration, culminating in a significant exhibition in 2013 at the FACT building. Manifest.AR is also planning to extend their explorations with exhibits within the Liverpool community. Pappenheimer and Manifest.AR were awarded the $32,000 grant for artists’ fees, production costs and travel costs while continuing research and production of this proposal.More Information: http://www.artdaily.org/index.asp?int_sec=2&int_new=54627[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Pace University art professor awarded grant to research link between augmented reality and viewer response.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Art Professor Awarded Grant to Research Link Between Augmented Reality and Viewer Response

Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’

Photo editors: This project has good visual elements. Photo opportunities can be arranged upon request.

Virtual reality meets art in newly funded research project

NEW YORK, NY, March 19, 2012 – Will Pappenheimer, associate professor of art at Pace University, and a founding member of the artist collective, Manifest.AR, have recently been awarded the ARtSENSE Commission at The Foundation for Creative Technology (FACT) in Liverpool, England for their proposal entitled ‘Invisible ARtaffects.’

Invisible ARtaffects will explore the apparent link of virtual objects with viewer response, via wearable devices designed to interpret the sensory input of the audience to control and create “augmented reality” objects and information. The goal is for the exhibitions to create an experience of virtual art which is responsive to viewers. The virtual affects the real, which in turn affects the virtual.

Researchers will include artists from Manifest.AR, the ARtSENSE Consortium of European organizations, and FACT working in collaboration, culminating in a significant exhibition in 2013 at the FACT building. Manifest.AR is also planning to extend their explorations with exhibits within the Liverpool community.

Pappenheimer and Manifest.AR were awarded the $32,000 grant for artists’ fees, production costs and travel costs while continuing research and production of this proposal.

Projects they are proposing are visualized in these pictures:

“FACT Sky Museum,” a virtual museum of skywriting created by FACT museum visitors, by Will Pappenheimer: http://manifestarblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/fact-sky-museum2.jpg

“Biomer Skelters,”  a virtual jungle forest generator, Will Pappenheimer and Tamiko Thiel: http://manifestarblog.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/forrestation-viz-1.jpg

About Will Pappenheimer

Will Pappenheimer is an artist and professor at Pace University in New York as well as a founding member of the Manifest.AR collective. His work has appeared in solo and group exhibitions nationally and internationally. One notable installation was his public mood ring in Tampa, FL, a combined Internet and spatial piece of artwork which allowed a large online community to display the emotional condition of public opinion and news stories during Super Bowl 2009 in colors in a public sculpture. His grants include an NEA Artist Fellowship; Traveling Scholars Award from School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Turbulence.org; Rhizome.org at the New Museum; and a large scale public network sculpture for the City of Tampa. His work with Manifest.AR has been reviewed in a variety of media, including New York Times, the Boston Globe, WIRED, NY Arts International, Art US, and MSNBC.com. For a complete list of his recent projects visit http://www.willpap-projects.com.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

Market Watch/The Wall Street Journal: Annual Computerworld Honors Program Names 2012 Laureates

Market Watch, part of the Wall Street Journal’s digital network, ran a press release from Computerworld on the Global Information Technology Awards for individuals and organizations that use information technology to benefit society. Pace Professor Jean Coppola, from the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems, was honored for her work teaching technology to older adults.

Market Watch, part of the Wall Street Journal’s digital network, ran a press release from Computerworld on the Global Information Technology Awards for individuals and organizations that use information technology to benefit society. Pace Professor Jean Coppola, from the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems, was honored for her work teaching technology to older adults.

From the press release:

Computerworld Honors Program, honoring visionary applications of information technology promoting positive social, economic and educational change, has selected 200 Laureates for 2012. These individuals will be commemorated during the Annual Laureates Medal Ceremony & Gala Awards Evening on June 4, 2012 at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.

For over two decades, The Computerworld Honors Program has recognized individuals and organizations who create and use information technology to promote and advance public welfare, contribute to the greater good of society and change the world for the better. The 2012 award categories are:
—  Collaboration
—  Digital Access
—  Economic Development
—  Emerging Technology
—  Environment
—  Health
—  Human Services
—  Innovation
—  Safety & Security
—  Training/Education

Read the rest of the article at Market Watch.

MarketWatch

 

Patch.com: Pace Students Head to International Mobile Challenge

Two Pace students are heading to South Africa to showcase their Android app.

Two Pace students are heading to South Africa to showcase their Android app. Patch.com ran the story on the Pace team’s success at the mobile challenge in Barcelona and their invitation to compete in South Africa.

Read the full story on Patch.com.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University researchers recognized for development of first new drug for “sleeping sickness” in 30 years

There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and Nigel Yarlett, PhD, chair of chemistry and physical sciences in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative Project of the Year 2011 Award given to Pace professors

NEW YORK, NY, March 12, 2012 – There are no fundraising walks for Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT or “sleeping sickness”) but a drug for this “orphan disease” has gone to clinical trial thanks in part to biology professor emeritus Cyrus Bacchi, PhD, and chemistry professor Nigel Yarlett, PhD, and their undergraduate students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace University.

The professors’ work out of Haskins Laboratories at Pace has been awarded the Project of the Year 2011 Award by the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) for their role in the development of the first new drug to go to clinical trial and the first new treatment for sleeping sickness since 1980. The award was given jointly to Scynexis Inc. of Research Triangle Park, NC, which synthesized the compounds, and Pace University which did initial testing in vivo. Several Pace chemistry and biology students assisted in animal testing of the drug, providing them with hands-on experience in drug development from the bench to in vivo studies. Haskins Labs identified 15 compounds that may work in humans.

Bacchi and Yarlett have devoted their careers to neglected diseases. The research of Haskins Labs on compounds to treat sleeping sickness was written about in The New York Times in 1985 and 2008. In one article the disease was called “fearsome but nearly forgotten because its victims are poor and obscure.” In another article one drug, eflornithine, the trademark name for DFMO discovered in 1980 at Pace, is mentioned saying it is a “miracle” the drug is available. The drug is still used as a first line clinical treatment for sleeping sickness.

About 150,000 people contract sleeping sickness each year, but 50 million people in 36 countries live in areas where they are at risk. During recent epidemics in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Angola, and Southern Sudan, prevalence has been as high as 50 percent. In some communities with high prevalence, the death rate from African sleeping sickness has exceeded that of HIV/AIDS. Nevertheless, there is no profit in it. Without outside funding and incentives, drug companies are not interested in developing treatments for such orphan diseases.

 

With funding from DNDi, which receives support from the Gates Foundation, the drug has been able to go to clinical trials.  One quarter of a million dollars a year is going to support this research at Pace.

The researchers have identified a new series of compounds which are effective in curing mice and are now being tested on larger mammals. Phase I clinical toxicity studies are beginning on humans in France on one compound, SCYX7158. Volunteers who are not infected take the drug to see if humans can tolerate it and are monitored closely for side effects. If these studies are successful, this compound will go to Phase II clinical trials later this year in African villages with infected inhabitants who are cut off from most medical access.

“For the people living in these villages, this sort of sickness is just a way of life,” said Yarlett.

“Sleeping sickness” has been called by The New York Times “too benign a nickname” for human African trypanosomiasis, which is caused by a protozoan. The disease is characterized by two distinct stages, early stage or blood stream infection and late stage disease of the central nervous system.  When the brain is affected, victims hallucinate and their behavior becomes erratic and sometimes violent. Victims may chase people with machetes, throw themselves into latrines and scream with pain at the touch of water. Near the end of the disease, they lapse into a state of listlessness followed by coma and death.

The Haskins Laboratories, which have been at Pace since 1970, have a long legacy of researching possible cures for diseases that are out of the public spotlight. “We work on things that aren’t stylish—not in vogue. And consequentially, things that aren’t typically funded to a great extent,” said Yarlett.

“Drugs were developed between 1920 and 1950 to treat sleeping sickness, but some of these drugs had an arsenic base and were toxic,” Yarlett said. “For about 10% of those being treated with these drugs, death occurred more quickly than it would have if they hadn’t been treated. These are the first new drugs developed to treat sleeping sickness in 30 years. We’re very excited.”

Workers at Haskins Labs are also developing a first line of treatment for a more global issue—cryptosporidiosis, a waterborne illness that causes chronic diarrhea. Its major impact has been among those with weakened immune systems, including those who are HIV positive, receiving cancer treatments, or those that have undergone organ transplants.

“Cryptosporidosis is one of the major causes of death in HIV positive people and currently there is nothing available to treat it,” Yarlett said.

Read the press release from DNDi here.

About Haskins Labs

The Haskins Laboratories was founded in 1935 at General Electrical and Union College by four young and innovative scientists, one of whom became its namesake, Caryl Haskins, a physicist and geneticist. In 1970 it split into two divisions, the Microbiology Division, under Seymour Hutner (one of the original scientists) affiliated with Pace University, and the Speech Recognition and Cognition Division affiliated with Yale University. It is funded by a number of sources, including the National Institutes of Health (in collaboration with the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas), Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), and Genzyme Corp and works in collaboration with pharmaceutical companies Scynexis and Anacor.

For more information about the work being done at the Haskins Laboratories, click here.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace University Team Placed Fourth in Mobile Challenge in Barcelona

Pace University students Peter Franceschini, a computer science major, and John Robb, majoring in both art and communications, placed fourth at The Berkeley Mobile International Collaborative (BMIC) University Mobile Challenge in Barcelona, Spain, and have been invited to compete at the Mobile Health Challenge in Cape Town, South Africa in May.

Pace Team Placed Fourth in BMIC’S University Mobile Challenge in Barcelona

PLEASANTVILLE, NY,  March 8, 2012 – Pace University students Peter Franceschini, a computer science major, and John Robb, majoring in both art and communications, placed fourth at The Berkeley Mobile International Collaborative (BMIC) University Mobile Challenge in Barcelona, Spain, and have been invited to compete at the Mobile Health Challenge in Cape Town, South Africa in May. Of the fourteen teams that competed, the Pace team was one of only three from the US.

Peter and John pooled their individual skills to create CANDOO, an app designed for Android based tablet devices. The app is designed to help seniors and/or those with fine motor skill difficulties to have an easier time accessing tablet features using large, clearly labeled buttons and voice input/output features. Users may also access their email, open a web browser, track their medications, or launch other apps with ease. The app is designed as a launcher, so the CANDOO home page is displayed upon powering up, and is easily reachable by a “Home” button in other apps.

A video demonstration of the CANDOO app is viewable at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFwCnUbIQR4.

The students were part of a class with computer science professor Jean Coppola, PhD. Coppola, a proponent of service-learning, challenged her students to create something that can help others. This was just one of several of her students’ projects. The CANDOO app has won several competitions including the BMIC challenge.

BMIC’s annual competition which began in 2009 provides students with the experience of international-level competition, as well as the chance to engage in an entrepreneurial endeavor. Select student teams from around the world travelled to Barcelona and were challenged to design a mobile app or business concept that addresses a need in today’s world. Entries were judged on a number of criteria: Commercial Appeal, Essential Value & Utility, Innovation & Uniqueness, UI and Quality of Experience, Effective Use of API(s) & Technology, Significance of “Problem” App Identifies/Solves, Due Diligence, and Funding. The competition not only challenged the students to win the competition, but to also gain the interest of investors and venture capitalists in attendance.

Peter and John will be travelling to South Africa in May for the GSMA Mobile Health University Challenge. The competition will challenge student teams to develop a Mobile Health concept that addresses a Healthcare need, and may be a business concept or technological development that targets any issue or end user.  Judging will be based upon similar criteria to the Barcelona event, with the addition of Meaningful Feedback, Global Markets, and Regulatory Considerations.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

 

The Daily Pleasantville: Pace’s Swim Teams Earn Academic Accolades

The Daily Pleasantville ran a story on Pace’s swimming and diving teams which ranked in the top 10 in all of Division II in terms of grade point average for the fall 2011 semester. (Left: Pace’s Kevin Dickson and the other members of men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams performed well in the pool and in the classroom in the fall 2011 semester.)

The Daily Pleasantville ran a story on Pace’s swimming and diving teams which ranked in the top 10 in all of Division II in terms of grade point average for the fall 2011 semester.

The College Swimming Coaches Association of America released the Scholar All-America Teams for Division II and both of Pace’s teams excelled. The men’s team finished with the top GPA in Division II with a 3.44, while the women finished 10th with a 3.39 GPA.

Twelve members of the women’s team and eight members of the men’s team made the fall 2011 Northeast-10 Commissioner’s Honor Roll. 

Read the original article here.

NEWS RELEASE: Nominees for the 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Awards include Two Pace Professors

Two Pace professors, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick authors of Scripting Hitchcock (Illinois UP, 2011), are up for Edgar Awards.

Two Pace professors, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick authors of Scripting Hitchcock (Illinois UP, 2011), are up for Edgar Awards. Mystery Writers of America announced its nominees for the 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Awards, honoring the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction and television published or produced in 2011. The Edgar® Awards will be presented to the winners at their 66th Gala Banquet, April 26, 2012 at the Grand Hyatt Hotel, New York City.

Scripting Hitchcock explores the collaborative process between Alfred Hitchcock and the screenwriters he hired to write the scripts for three of his greatest films: Psycho, The Birds, and Marnie. Drawing from extensive interviews with these screenwriters—Joseph Stefano, Evan Hunter, and Jay Presson Allen– and other film technicians who worked for Hitchcock, Walter Raubicheck and Walter Srebnick illustrate how much of the filmmaking process took place not on the set but in the adaptation of the sources, the mutual creation of plot and characters by the director and the writers, and the various revisions of the screenplays of the films. This volume gives due credit to the writers who gave narrative form to Hitchcock’s cinematic vision.

Read the press release here.

 

Patch.com: Pace Programs Rank High in U.S. News & World Report Survey

The Pleasantville Patch reported, among other outlets, that Pace was named among the top online programs by US News & World Report.

The Pleasantville Patch reported, among other outlets, that Pace was named among the top online programs by US News & World Report.

Read the article here:

Pace Programs Rank High in U.S. News & World Report Survey – Pleasantville-Briarcliff Manor, NY Patch.

US News and World Report: U.S. News Ranks Top Online Degree Programs

Pace University’s undergraduate online degree programs have won spots in the top of the first-ever US News & World Report rankings of “Top On-line Education Programs.”

Pace University’s undergraduate online degree programs have won spots in the top of the first-ever US News & World Report rankings of “Top On-line Education Programs.” The story has appeared on the US News & World Report web site and in The Daily News.

From US News and World Report:

Online course enrollment in the United States hit an all-time high in 2010 with more than 6.1 million students, and the trend shows no signs of leveling off, according to a 2011 report by the Babson Survey Research Group.

Enrollment in online classes doubled between 2007 and 2011, driven largely by a stagnant economy and competitive job market, but also by robust online offerings from established public and private institutions, according to the report. At more than 2,500 colleges and universities surveyed, 65 percent of administrators say that online learning is a vital piece of their institution’s long-term strategy.

Recognizing the growing importance of online education in the college experience, and the unique formula necessary to make online degree programs successful, U.S. News is releasing its first Top Online Education Programs rankings.

U.S. News ranked 196 online bachelor’s degree programs and 523 online master’s degree programs in business, engineering, nursing, education, and computer information technology. Programs considered for the rankings needed to have at least 80 percent of their course content available online.

Bachelor’s programs were ranked in three distinct categories: student engagement and assessment, student services and technology, and faculty credentials and training. Master’s programs had similar ranking categories, but were ranked on student engagement and accreditation, rather than assessment, and had a separate indicator ranking for admissions selectivity.

[See the methodologies behind the Top Online Programs rankings.]

The U.S. News honor roll lists single out schools that ranked in the top third across at least three of these indicator rankings. Honor roll lists were compiled for online bachelor’s degree programs and master’s degree programs in nursing, business, education, and engineering. Online master’s programs in computer information technology have no honor roll because too few programs from the smaller universe of schools met the criteria.

While for-profit institutions such as the University of Phoenix, DeVry University, and American Public University are among the schools with the highest enrollments in online programs, no for-profit institutions received honor roll distinctions. Instead, a handful of public and private institutions with established on-campus programs, in addition to online offerings, received high marks across all categories.

The top performers in online bachelor’s degree programs include Pace University in New York.

Read full article here:

U.S. News Ranks Top Online Degree Programs – US News and World Report.

Read Pace press release here.

Read the Daily News print version here.