NEWS RELEASE: Sister St. John Delany presented with proclamation by Mayor Tom Roach declaring “Sister St. John Delany Day” in White Plains

White Plains Mayor Tom Roach declared October 24, 2013 to be “Sister St. John Delany Day” at a ceremony at the Center for Literacy Enrichment located on the Pace Law School campus yesterday.

Lifelong educator Sister St. John Delany presented with proclamation by White Plains Mayor Tom Roach declaring October 24, 2013 “Sister St. John Delany Day” in the City of White Plains

WHITE PLAINS, October 25 – White Plains Mayor Tom Roach declared October 24, 2013 to be “Sister St. John Delany Day” at a ceremony at the Center for Literacy Enrichment located on the Pace Law School campus yesterday.  Mayor Roach presented Sister St. John Delany, PhD, Founder and Director of the Center for Literacy Enrichment with an official proclamation to mark this special occasion. The room was filled with Sister’s friends and supporters from the Westchester community, including Interim Superintendent of White Plains schools Timothy Connors and fellow educators and administration officials from Pace University.

In a heart-felt speech Mayor Roach spoke about Sister’s dedication to teaching and her contributions to literacy in Westchester and the countless students she has taught through the years. “Sister Delaney is a remarkable person who has been teaching and caring for others for most of her life.  You can see the affection that the young people who work with her have for her and it is heart-warming and inspiring to watch. That’s the kind of thing you can’t quantify.”

“Sister St. John absolutely exemplifies the values of the Pace University School of Education,” says Dean Andrea (Penny) Spencer, Dean of the School of Education. “As a teacher, she is a tireless advocate who ensures that all students have the skills and opportunities to grow into excited and life-long learners. She further serves as a beloved instructor and mentor to pre-service educators, inspiring them to create caring classroom communities where learning is a joy not a task.”

Sister St. John taught first grade in White Plains from 1941 to 1972 before founding the Center for Literacy Enrichment and becoming an Associate Professor in the School of Education at Pace University. Sister’s former students include U.S. Poet Laureate (2004-2006) Billy Collins, football great Bob Hyland and Pat Casey, editor of the White Plains Examiner. Sister will also be honored on December 6 at a lunch at the Marriot in Tarrytown as a Senior Hall of Fame Honoree for her significant contributions to enhance educational opportunities and achievement for Westchester County children.

Years before commercial tutoring centers became the norm, Pace University’s Center for Literacy Enrichment was established offered affordable literacy instruction to students of all ages. This year, the Center is proudly celebrating its 41st anniversary with its founder and Director, Sister St. John Delany who is 90 years young. “We encourage students in their efforts with their studies,” said Sister at the ceremony. “We tell the students, ‘You can do it. You can do better’ … and they do.”

About the Center for Literacy Enrichment

The Center for Literacy Enrichment, part of the School of Education at Pace, is housed on Pace University’s Law School campus in White Plains. The Center is staffed by trained literacy tutors, many of whom are enrolled in the Masters in Literacy Program at Pace. The Center serves a broad range of students from diverse socio-economic and cultural backgrounds. Instruction to improve reading skills is provided in small groups or private sessions to K-12 students – both U.S. and foreign-born. The Center takes a skills-based approach with an emphasis on literature.

About Pace University

Since 1906 Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact:

Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Professor Nick Catalano Selected as Peter X. Finnerty Leadership Award Recipient

The Pace University Department of Athletics announced that a Pace professor, Nicholas Catalano, PhD, has been selected as this year’s Peter X. Finnerty Leadership Award recipient. Catalano will be honored as part of the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame Class of 2013 and awards dinner on Friday, April 12 at the Tudor Room of Pace’s White Plains Law School Campus. The evening will feature a reception starting at 6:00 pm followed by dinner and the induction ceremony starting at 7:00 pm.

The Pace University Department of Athletics announced that a Pace professor, Nicholas Catalano, PhD, has been selected as this year’s Peter X. Finnerty Leadership Award recipient. Catalano will be honored as part of the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame Class of 2013 and awards dinner on Friday, April 12 at the Tudor Room of Pace’s White Plains Law School Campus. The evening will feature a reception starting at 6:00 pm followed by dinner and the induction ceremony starting at 7:00 pm.

This year marks Catalano’s 50th year at Pace University. He was a pioneer in the formation of the Pace Football program in the late 1960’s. At the request of the student government Catalano became the faculty general manager to the Pace Football club and was active in coaching, hiring personnel, recruiting new players and establishing academic standards. He also led the effort t to transition the Pace Football program from a club team to NCAA Division III status in 1978 to provide the program with better competition against local rivals Fordham University, Iona College, Hofstra University and Marist College among others during the late 1970s. Pace President Edward Mortola, PhD, Peter Finnerty and Catalano brought the New York Football Giants to the Pace campus for preseason camp for many years. The deal they negotiated included funds to build the athletic field house and resources for field improvements. Catalano served as the “Voice of the Setters” for 32 seasons as the public address announcer and was instrumental in getting the games broadcast on local radio.

Catalano has gone on to a successful career as a professor and novelist. He is a professor of Literature and Music at Pace. Catalano is a former director of the university’s Patricia O. Ewers Center for Music. He is author of “Clifford Brown: The life and Art of the Legendary Jazz Trumpeter”, “New York Nights” and “A New Yorker at Sea” that documents his trip around the world in a sail boat in 1988. Catalano also writes regular columns about jazz music for the web site “All About Jazz.”

Peter X. Finnerty, former Director of Athletics, Director of Alumni Relations, athlete, professor, coach, and inductee of the Pace University Hall of Fame, established the Athletics and Recreation Program at Pace University in 1947. Finnerty served the University and its students for over 40 years. He was the Director of Athletics from 1947-88 as well as the men’s basketball coach from 1948-60 and the baseball coach from 1948-64. He personified the values of discipline and hard work and, in keeping with the University motto, Opportunitas, committed to helping students realize their potential.

The Peter X. Finnerty Award is presented to a member or members of the Pace University athletics community for outstanding leadership and service to the University or to society as a whole. The individual/s selected shall exemplify those characteristics for which Peter Finnerty was best known: hard work, a spirit of competition, and the ability to serve and lead with integrity and to inspire others to do the same. This honor has only been awarded twice since its creation. The first recipient was in 2001 to former Board of Trustee Charles F. Jacey Jr. The second recipient was former Pace student-athlete and longtime supporter Garrett DeGraff Jr. in 2002.

The newest members to the Pace Athletics Hall of Fame for the Class of 2013 are Kim DePaola-Napier (Softball ’89), Brian Finnerty (Baseball ’72), Rich Middlebrook (Football ’87), Fred Oglesby (Men’s Basketball ’83) and Michelle Seeley-Flannory (Volleyball ’99). Pace Athletics Hall of Fame was started in 1997 with this year’s ceremony marking the twelfth induction class.

Westchester Magazine: Top 8 Leaders in Westchester

Three of Westchester Magazine’s top 8 leaders in Westchester County are from Pace. “The Riverkeeper” John Cronin, “The Eco-advocate” Nick Robinson and “The Cyber-Security ‘Type’ ” Logan Romm were all featured with interviews and photos among the top 8 in a recent article in the magazine.

Three of Westchester Magazine’s top 8 leaders in Westchester County are from Pace. “The Riverkeeper” John Cronin, “The Eco-advocate” Nick Robinson and “The Cyber-Security ‘Type’ ” Logan Romm were all featured with interviews and photos among the top 8 in a recent article in the magazine.

From Westchester Magazine about the 8 leaders:

… “Westchesterites are looking at our biggest issues and, hopefully, will alter the way we live for the better. They’re impacting Westchester, New York, the USA, and the whole world. These are the 2013 Game Changers.”

About John Cronin, Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs, Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies:

“You can go on your iPhone, and you can know temperature, humidity, and wind speed in Johannesburg, South Africa, in real time,” says John Cronin, senior fellow for Environmental Affairs at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in Pleasantville. “But there’s nobody who can tell you—in real time—what’s in your glass of drinking water.”

The fact is disconcerting, but Cronin, 62, aims to change it. He’s organized dropping  sensors in the Hudson and its tributaries to monitor water quality and conditions. But Cronin wants to go further. In addition to changing how we keep our river clean—a project he’s been working on for 40 years—he wants to change the partnerships we enlist to help solve environmental problems.

In October 1973, Cronin was working painting houses when he met Pete Seeger at an event for Seeger’s environmental advocacy and educational vessel, the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater. The two men embarked on a volunteer project: As Seeger sang sea shanties and yodeled, the folk icon brought Cronin into the environmental world. Seeger would insist that, “‘if we all work together, we can clean up the Hudson River.’ I thought that idea was ludicrous,” says Cronin. “The River was huge, horribly polluted.” Nonetheless, inspired by Seeger, Cronin began a career in environmental issues, eventually taking stints advising Republican Congressman Hamilton Fish, Jr., and Democratic New York State Assemblyman Maurice Hinchey.

“I was hooked,” he says. “I went from thinking Pete was out of his mind to thinking that, if you were determined enough, you could make an enormous difference.” Becoming the inaugural Hudson Riverkeeper in 1983, Cronin acted as the clean-water advocate for the River and its tributaries, which provide 9 million New Yorkers with drinking water.

Thanks to Cronin’s media savvy and some real luck—while filming a segment for NBC news, he came upon an Exxon oil tanker discharging pollutants just 1,500 feet from drinking water—and the program took off. Soon, there was a Soundkeeper for Long Island, then a Baykeeper in San Francisco. Today, there are more than 200 similar programs all over the world. During his time as Riverkeeper, Cronin took on all kinds of polluters: New York City, for instance, was dumping 1.5 billion gallons of sewage into the River every day. But many of those on the opposite side of litigation were corporations.

In the past decade, however, Cronin began to formulate different ideas about problem-solving on the environment. He felt that we were “mostly operating under twentieth-century models when twenty-first-century problems need all the talent, all the skills we can muster—no mater where they come from.” Enforcement was still a primary goal, he thought, but the expertise, technology, and capital available in the private sector were nothing to eschew, either. In 2004, he founded the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, which is today part of Clarkson University, with just this collaborative goal in mind.

One alliance, with Armonk-based IBM, has proved crucial in Cronin’s water-monitoring efforts. John Kelly, a senior vice president and director of Yorktown’s IBM Research (who oversees some 3,000 scientists in laboratories around the world), agrees that Cronin’s ideas are the future. “I think he embodies a visionary who can identify what’s really important through all the clutter. Other people were dreaming, but he knew what to do. His ideas are contagious, and he has the wherewithal to get it done.”

About Nick Robinson, University Professor and Gilbert & Sarah Kerlin Distinguished Professor of Environmental Law, Pace University:

“No, the fights for conservation and against climate change aren’t totally new. So, even if Pace University Law Professor Nicholas Robinson is at the center of both of those struggles, why do we think he also has the next big idea? It’s not just because he was around and affecting policy at the highest levels back when it was a new idea, although he was. Nor is it because his predictions about flooding recently have proven sadly accurate, although they have. It’s because, with all this experience, he knows exactly what we’re going to have to do about it all.

Robinson, of Sleepy Hollow, grew up mostly in Palo Alto, California, where he enjoyed outdoor activities like camping in the Sierras, but the East Coast-style air and water pollution he saw when he started college at Brown University in the early 1960s made him begin taking the study of environmental policy seriously. By 1972, just two years after Robinson graduated from Columbia Law School, New York had adopted his draft of the landmark Tidal Wetlands Act, and “the UN was waking up to the concerns of the environment,” says Robinson, 67. “I was asked by the Sierra Club to attend the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm.”

In the late 1970s, Robinson helped found one of the first environmental law programs in the country at Pace Law School. He was an advisor to Governor Mario Cuomo, general counsel and deputy commissioner of the State Department of Environmental Conservation, and a treaty delegate to the Soviet Union under five presidents. As if all of that weren’t enough, he’s even made his mark on the County’s cultural life, orchestrating the donation of the old Philipse Manor train station to the Hudson Valley Writers’ Center for its headquarters in the late 1980s before such plans for renovation and re-use were common.

But it’s his international work that set the stage for him to establish some of the most important coming trends in the environmental movement. He has helped instruct environmental groups on what legal systems they’ll encounter in writing international treaties, harmonized treaties on endangered species that migrate across borders, and helped establish trans-boundary cooperation for contested areas like the Arctic Circle. “But locally, the same issues play out,” he says. Dealing with climate change means finding money for repairs, reinforcing or altering infrastructure, managing native flora to mitigate flooding, drafting environmental impact statements, and taking other measures that Robinson has long been a part of.

“I’ve been working with the faculty at our Pleasantville campus to organize the Pocantico River Watershed Conservancy,” he said, 12 days before Superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey. “How should it be inter-managed to protect the downstream communities from flooding? It’s not a question of if; it’s only a question of when. We need to get ready for the ‘retreat from the coasts,’ moving infrastructure inland. If you have a road or a pipeline or a buffer right along a coastal area and you don’t help adapt where the river water can go, then you’re going to end up having storms cause a lot of property damage. We cannot save the Hudson River unless we better save the tributaries of the Hudson. We need to take the experiences we have around the world and begin actually solving our local problems. And then we have to share that with similarly situated people all over the world.”

About Seidenberg School student Logan Romm, keystroke biometrics researcher:

“If you’ve logged onto an online retailer’s website months after you last shopped there and found that you were still signed in or if you’ve ever noticed that your email was still logged in after returning from a vacation, then you can well imagine how easy it would be for a cyber bad guy to access your information. But if 27-year-old Logan Romm’s project takes off, those bad guys are going to have to work much harder.

The White Plains resident, who grew up in Rye Brook, has a full-time job as a marketing manager at Verizon, but it was his studies in Internet Technology at Pace University, where he earned his master’s in 2012, that are helping to close these security holes. Along with four other teammates (and dozens of graduate students who have put in time since the project started seven years ago), Romm is studying keystroke biometrics—in other words, identifying people by how they type—and developing its potential for security applications. There is, after all, a surprisingly large amount of data in keystrokes—how quickly people type certain letter combinations, how they scroll, if they prefer the number pad or the numbers above the letters—and, like a fingerprint or an iris, individuals’ typing characteristics are unique to them.

The applications of figuring out how to recognize those unique features are nearly limitless. Authenticating students taking tests online comes to mind. Corporations with proprietary research on their servers and governments with classified documents to protect are always looking for the next step in security. And, as Romm points out, this may be it. After all, passwords can be stolen or guessed, and a single entry often keeps users logged in to sensitive information for hours or even days after they leave the console. But monitoring keystrokes allows ongoing authentication of users, “so, even if an intruder gains access initially, if they are not behaving the way the actual user does then that access could be detected and the unauthorized user’s session could be terminated,” he says. The project’s director, Professor Charles Tappert, has been in touch with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency at the US Department of Defense, although nothing has been finalized.

Romm and his teammates began their work last year, but they were responsible for the meat of the seven-year-old project: collecting typing samples and analyzing them, including the first samples of people working on browsers.

“It’s getting harder and harder to create a secure a password,” Romm says, “but this definitely makes a lot of sense for the next level.”

Read the full article here.

Armonk Daily Voice: Byram Hills Grad Excels At Pace In Academic Competition

A member of Pace’s Federal Reserve Challenge Team was featured by her hometown media. (Left: Kelsey Berro, second from the left, stands with her College Federal Reserve Challenge teammates at Nationals, where they finished third.)

Armonk native and 2011 Byram Hills High School graduate Kelsey Berro just finished a 2012 College Federal Reserve Challenge season to remember.

Her Pace University undergraduate team won first place in New York State in November and just finished third in the national round, which was held in Washington, D.C.

The College Federal Reserve Challenge is a national academic competition consisting of a 15-minute economic presentation followed by a 15-minute question and answer period. During the Q&A portion, students address questions about finance, economics, banking, and monetary policy administered by a panel of professionals who work at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Berro, now a sophomore, was one of five students on this year’s team. Her four teammates — Nashrah Ahmed, William Hellander, Daniel Boutarel and Sonia Sternick — were seniors.

“I was able to absorb a huge amount of knowledge quickly due to their guidance and mentorship,” said Berro. “Each team member has their individual strengths, whether in bank regulation or federal communication policy, and we were able to learn from each other.”

Pace beat 29 other colleges in three rounds of competition, including Hamilton, Cornell and New York University. The team also received the Lloyd Bromberg Teamwork Award for team coordination and presentation.

“There is a stigma that teams from big-name schools will automatically be our strongest competitors, but Pace University has been consistently placing in the winners circle at the Fed for the past few years,” said Berro.

Berro credits a big part of her success to her time at Byram Hills.

“Byram Hills High School prepares you very well for college,” she said. “The teachers at Byram expect a lot from you. At the time it seemed like too much work, but now I realize they were just preparing us for upper-level learning.”

Byram Hills Grad Excels At Pace In Academic Competition | The Armonk Daily Voice.

NEWS RELEASE: Softball Places 3rd On Division II NFCA All-Academic Ranks

The Pace University Softball team ranked third on the National Fastpitch Coaches Association Division II All-Academic Team for the 2011-12 academic year. The Setters posted a team GPA for 3.527, which was also the top GPA among the Northeast-10 Conference schools. The top school in the country was Grand Canyon University with a 3.600 mark and marked the second year in a row the Setters were ranked among the top academic softball programs in the country.

Pace is #1 Among Northeast-10 Conference Schools

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.- The Pace University Softball team ranked third on the National Fastpitch Coaches Association Division II All-Academic Team for the 2011-12 academic year. The Setters posted a team GPA for 3.527, which was also the top GPA among the Northeast-10 Conference schools. The top school in the country was Grand Canyon University with a 3.600 mark.

This is the second year in a row that the Setters have been ranked in the top-25 in the nation also the second consecutive season that their team GPA was first among the NE-10 schools. Education major and catcher Lauren Bell (New Windsor, NY/Newburgh Free) posted a 3.93 GPA for the 2011-12 year and finished her collegiate career with a 3.65 cum GPA. Pitcher and first baseman Chelsea Shea (Babylon, NY/West Babylon) had a 3.820 GPA for the year, while Criminal Justice major and designated player and first baseman Natalie Gellos (Seattle, WA/Holy Names Academy) posted a 3.77 GPA.

The Setters saw success on the field in 2012 as they ranked in the top-5 in in the NE-10 in runs, homeruns, RBI’s, batting average, slugging and doubles. Pace had four players named to the NE-10 All-Conference teams led by Bell who was named to the Third Team. Gellos along with fellow freshmen, Hana Wright ((Hillsboro, OR/Valley Catholic) and Jeane Drury (Flanders, NJ/Morris Catholic) were selected to the NE-10 All-Rookie Team.

Bell wrapped up her outstanding four-year career as she finished her 2012 season with a .333 batting average with six homeruns, two grand slams, along with six doubles and 23 RBI’s for the year. She finished her career in the top-10 in school history every major offensive category as she posted a career .368 batting average, good for fifth place.

Gellos posted a standout season in her first year in a Pace uniform as she was second on the team with a .351 batting average. She finished tied for ninth in the NE-10 in doubles this season. She also drove in 26 runs, hit three homeruns and was second on the team with 30 runs scored this season. Wright had a record-setting season for Pace as a freshman, playing primarily at catcher this year. She tied the school single season homerun mark as she finished with a team-best 10 homeruns in 2012. She also led the team with 39 RBI’s as she finished fifth on Pace’s single season record list. She ranked fourth in the NE-10 in RBI’s and was seventh in homeruns. Drury was an outstanding all-around performer for the Setters this season as she finished third on the team with a .333 batting average and ranked eighth in the NE-10 with nine homeruns.

Pace looks to make a big impact on field as they did in the classroom in 2013. The Setters open their spring season on March 1, 2013 as they travel to Chowan University in Murfreesboro, NC.

NEWS RELEASE: New Artist in Residence Programs Offer Pace University Students Exposure to Industry Stars

Pace University performing arts students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will gain exposure this year to high-profile industry stars on campus through new artist-in-residence programs in musical theater and commercial dance.

NEW ARTIST IN RESIDENCE PROGRAMS OFFER PACE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS EXPOSURE TO INDUSTRY STARS

Tony Award-Winner, Composer Adam Guettel, To Be First Artist-in-Residence at Pace University’s Musical Theater Program

NEW YORK, NY, October 3, 2012 –Pace University performing arts students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will gain exposure this year to high-profile industry stars on campus through new artist-in-residence programs in musical theater and commercial dance.

These programs bring distinguished professional guest artists to campus annually to share expertise from the field. Beginning this fall, Pace students  will learn first-hand the process of creating, producing and performing new musical theater material with Tony award-winning composer and lyricist Adam Guettel,  the first of a series of artists-in-residence in Pace’s musical theater program, made possible through an anonymous endowed gift.

Guettel will work with faculty members at Pace to teach a variety of master classes and critique student projects. Subjects covered will include vocal performance, song interpretation, the process of composition and the creative process. Guettel will also workshop new musical material at Pace.

Guettel will give a public lecture in spring 2013, in which he will explore the creative process by which he composes music and writes lyrics for the theater that will include demonstrations from his work performed by current and recent graduates from the Pace BFA in Musical Theater program. 

This semester the commercial dance program kicked-off an artist-in-residence program made possible by a generous gift from Voice of an Angel. Pace students learned trade secrets from choreographer and dancer Brian Friedman during two days of intensive workshops. Upcoming dance artists-in-residence this semester at Pace include New York City Ballet star Tiler Peck, musical writer and performer Gregg Russell, and dancer and “Spider-Man, Turn Off the Dark” and “Cirque du Soleil” choreographer Cherice Barton.

“Through the generosity of our donors we are able to take full advantage of the richness of our New York City location and bring world-renowned talent to our campus several times over the course of the academic year, giving our students unique opportunities,” said Nira Herrmann, Dyson College dean. “This program truly illustrates how Dyson and Pace make use of New York as an extension of our campus, not only by having students go out into the city, but also by bringing its fabulous resources onto our campus.”

About Adam Guettel: Adam Guettel is an American composer-lyricist of musical theater and opera. He is best known for the musical “The Light in the Piazza,” for which he won two Tony Awards for Best Score and Best Orchestrations, and two Drama Desk Awards for Best Music and Best Orchestrations. His early works include 1996’s “Floyd Collins,” “Love’s Fire,” and “Saturn Returns.” Guettel’s songs have been recorded by such artists as Audra McDonald and Brian d’Arcy James. He also contributed original scores to several documentary films, including “Arguing the World and Jack: The Last Kennedy Film.” In 1999, he performed a concert evening of his own work at New York’s Town Hall. In 2004, Guettel contributed vocals to Broadway star and cabaret singer Jessica Molaskey’s P.S. Classics album “Make Believe.” In July 2009, the Signature Theatre of Arlington, Virginia commissioned Guettel to write a new musical for their 2011-2012 season under the auspices of their American Musical Voices Project.

About Performing Arts at Pace University: Pace University’s Performing Arts Department offers Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees in Acting, Musical Theater and Commercial Dance, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theater Arts with specialized focuses in Acting, Commercial Dance, Directing or Design/Technical Theater. For more information, visit www.pace.edu/dyson/performingarts.

Dyson College is also home to The Actors Studio Drama School with the only MFA theater program officially sanctioned by The Actors Studio. The curriculum is designed jointly by the presidents of The Actors Studio, Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino. Students participate in craft seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series, “Inside The Actors Studio,” hosted by James Lipton. For further information about the program, go to www.pace.edu/actorsstudiomfa

About Pace University: For over 100 years, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University College of Health Professions Receives Veterans’ Grant

Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program, and the Physician Assistant program.

Pace University College of Health Professions Receives Veterans’ Grant

NEW YORK, NY, September 12, 2012 – Pace University’s College of Health Professions has been awarded a grant of $60,000 from the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women to provide scholarships to female veterans or female dependents of veterans. The scholarships of up to $10,000 per year are available for the next two years to qualifying students in the Combined Degree program, the undergraduate RN-4 program (junior and senior years), the Family Nurse Practitioner program, and the Physician Assistant program.

The first scholarship awardee at Pace is US Army veteran Casmin Bennett, a student in the Combined Degree Program, a 12-month accelerated nursing baccalaureate program for career changers.

Bennett says, “I grew up in Jamaica and came to the U.S. in 2000. I did not always want to be a nurse, but on deployment to Iraq, I had an epiphany. I can still vividly remember telling my sergeant that when it was over, I would return home and do something meaningful with my life. I came home and I have been working toward this goal ever since. The foundation’s scholarship will greatly alleviate the financial burden of paying for my nursing degree.”

Robert Rahni, Veteran Specialist and adjunct professor at Pace said, “Casmin Bennett has honorably served our nation. The funds from the foundation’s Veterans Grant with the Pace 50% Veterans Scholarship and her well-deserved GI Bill benefits will enable her to complete the nursing program expeditiously.”

“Thanks to the generous support of the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women, this is the first grant that is available to both nursing and physician assistant students, and the first grant specifically for female veterans and their dependents at Pace,” said Sophie Kaufman, executive director of the Center of Excellence – ALPS (Advancing Leadership, Partnerships, and Scholarship) at Pace’s College of Health Professions.

“The Lienhard School of Nursing has a history of commitment to helping veterans,” said Gerrie Colombraro, PhD, RN, interim dean of the College of Health Professions. “In 2009, Lienhard was one of the few nursing schools to participate in the Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy, a partnership to increase nursing faculty and students and enhance the professional development of VA nurses.”

In addition, Lienhard was one of 20 nursing schools nationwide to be invited to an event earlier this year with First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden as part of the Joining Forces initiative to educate nursing students on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury.

Veteran-turned-actor Matthew Pennington spoke to Pace nursing and physician assistant students in the spring about his experiences with PTSD, highlighted in A Marine’s Guide to Fishing – a short film in which he stars.

“During clinical rotations Pace students are very adept at sorting out the medical conditions of their patients at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Hospital but are sometimes uncertain as how to approach patients with PTSD and substance abuse issues,” said nursing professor Joanne Knoesel, RN. “Hearing from a vet with PTSD provided them with better insight on how to help these patients.”

In addition to the new scholarship, Pace offers other scholarships for veterans and was selected by G.I. Jobs magazine as a Military Friendly School for 2012, an honor awarded to only 15% of all colleges, universities, and trade schools nationwide.

Pace offers a Veterans Scholarship which can cover half of a student’s tuition (in fall and spring semesters) for full and part-time undergraduate and graduate students.  Additionally, admitted veterans are eligible to receive need-based financial aid from Pace as well as benefits offered by the GI Bill. Veteran students may be eligible to receive full coverage of tuition through Pace’s Yellow Ribbon Program. Pace University also provides application fee waivers to all veteran applicants.

According to Rahni, “The Veteran Affairs team at Pace is committed to ensuring that veteran students’ transitions are seamless.”

Students who wish to apply for the scholarship can contact Sophie Kaufman (skaufman@pace.edu) or Robert Rahni, Pace Veteran Specialist (rrahni@pace.edu).

About The Jewish Foundation for Education of Women (JFEW):  The Jewish Foundation for Education of Women is a New York City-based, nonsectarian organization helping women with financial need meet their education and career goals through scholarships and opportunities for professional development. In partnership with schools and nonprofits, JFEW fosters a community of women dedicated to education, professional achievement and who contribute to society. www.jfew.org

About the College of Health Professions: Pace’s College of Health Professions is made up of the Lienhard School of Nursing and the Pace University-Lenox Hill Hospital Physician Assistant Studies program. Students at the College learn evidence-based care, cultural competence and primary health care in an interprofessional setting in programs preparing them to be family nurse practitioners, advanced practice nurses, physician assistants, registered nurses and clinical leaders.

About Pace University For over 100 years, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Athletics Strikes Gold Twice to Earn Top Honors at the NACMA Best of Awards

Dallas, Texas- The Pace University Athletics Department was awarded two gold medals at the National Association of Collegiate Marketing Administrators (NACMA) Best of Awards ceremony on Tuesday afternoon at the annual National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) conference held this year in Dallas, TX.

Dallas, Texas- The Pace University Athletics Department was awarded two gold medals at the National Association of Collegiate Marketing Administrators (NACMA) Best of Awards ceremony on Tuesday afternoon at the annual National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) conference held this year in Dallas, TX.

Pace received a gold medal in the video promotion category for the Pace Football promo video to kick off the 2011 Pace Football season against Stonehill.

To watch this video click here

Pace also received a second gold medal in the student promotion category for the student promotion video and twitter account campaign for T-Bone, the university mascot. The video and twitter account was produced to get more incoming freshman and current students to be active and promote events on campus.

To watch this video click here

Initiated in 2003, the NACMA Best of Awards program honors outstanding achievement in marketing and promotions. Awards are presented in 13 categories, with each category divided into three groups based upon school size and conference affiliations to promote fairness. An association record of more than 950 awards entries were received for the 2011-12 year.

About Pace Athletics: Pace University is an NCAA Division II member of the Northeast-10 Conference with 14 varsity sports teams. During the 2011-12 school year, the Pace women’s volleyball and women’s basketball teams returned to the NCAA Division II Tournament for a third consecutive year. In addition, the baseball team won the NE-10 Southwest Division regular season title. On the academic side, the department finished the school year with a 3.21 cumulative GPA.

About Pace University: Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and College of Health Professions.

Nursing Spectrum: Notable Nurses – Meet Joanne Singleton

Nursing Spectrum featured nursing professor Joanne Singleton, RN, FNP, PhD, chair of graduate studies and director of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Pace’s College of Health Professions, who was inducted as a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine in November.

Nursing Spectrum featured nursing professor Joanne Singleton, RN, FNP, PhD, chair of graduate studies and director of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Pace’s College of Health Professions, who was inducted as a fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine in November.

View the article online here. View a pdf of the article here.

Singleton was also mentioned in another Nursing Spectrum/Nurse.com article that names the Nursing Excellence finalists.

From Nurse.com:

Each year, Nurse.com/Nursing Spectrum calls upon our readers to nominate exceptional nurse colleagues for our Nursing Excellence program. For more than a decade, we have received thousands of entries that contain stories of phenomenal nurse leaders, mentors and clinicians. This year has proven no different. The nurses nominated for our 2012 Nursing Excellence program have proven true nursing excellence is alive and well.

Joanne Singleton, RN, PhD, FNP-BC, FNAP, FNYAM, professor, chair of the Department of Graduate Studies and DNP Program director, Pace University, Lienhard School of Nursing, Pleasantville, N.Y.

Excelling in teaching, scholarship and service, Singleton helped launch Pace’s first DNP program, guiding the first class of 20 students through the experience. Singleton has a commitment to evidence-based practice, leading faculty members a decade ago to revise Pace’s Family Nurse Practitioner curriculum to use an evidence-based practice framework. Distinguishing herself with numerous peer-reviewed publications, Singleton led a faculty team in a systematic review of smoking cessation initiatives and provides consultations and presentations on health-related topics to New York City public schools. Colleagues are impressed by Singleton’s teaching skills at Pace, where she receives positive evaluations from students and received a Lienhard School of Nursing Award for Teaching Excellence in May 2010. She also is a respected member of the Lienhard Leadership Team and has been instrumental in developing the college’s strategic plan. Blazing new paths in scholarship aimed at eliminating health disparities, Singleton is dedicated to cultural competence, evidence-based practice and primary healthcare.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Student Newspaper Recognized with Two Awards from Press Associations

The Pace Chronicle, the student newspaper for the Pleasantville/Briarcliff Manor campuses of Pace University, has been awarded First Place by the New York Press Association (NYPA) for Best Feature Story as part of the NYPA annual Best College Newspaper Excellence Awards.

PACE UNIVERSITY STUDENT NEWSPAPER RECOGNIZED WITH TWO AWARDS FROM PRESS ASSOCIATIONS

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, APRIL 20, 2012 – The Pace Chronicle, the student newspaper for the Pleasantville/Briarcliff Manor campuses of Pace University, has been awarded First Place by the New York Press Association (NYPA) for Best Feature Story as part of the NYPA annual Best College Newspaper Excellence Awards.

The winning story was one that appeared in honor of the one year anniversary of the death of Pace student Danroy “DJ” Henry Jr., published in the Oct. 12, 2011 edition of the paper. There were four categories and a total of only 13 winning college newspapers.

“The student newspaper at Pace has an enthusiastic and dedicated staff with bright futures,” said dean for students Lisa Bardill Moscaritolo. “The article that won was about a topic that touched this campus deeply and the staff put their hearts and souls into it. We are very proud of their accomplishments.”

The paper was also recently recognized with a first place award by the American Scholastic Association which runs annual reviews for scholastic yearbooks, magazines and newspapers judged by a panel of educators who are experienced faculty advisers for scholastic publications.

These are the first awards for the Pace Pleasantville student newspaper since 1998 when it was then known as New Morning.

Michael Oleaga is the Editor-in-Chief of The Pace Chronicle Newspaper and can be reached at 914-773-3401 or PaceChronicle@pace.edu. Find the paper on Twitter at Twitter.com/PaceChronicle.

About the New York Press Association

The New York Press Association was founded in 1853 by 32 publishers to effectively set standards of commercial practice and financial management that would help small newspapers prosper.
Today, independently-owned publications across New York State are part of NYPA’s database of newspapers which includes 727 weekly community newspapers, 58 daily newspapers, and 147 culturally-specific newspapers. Combined weekly newspaper circulation is 11.6M; daily circulation is 5.6M, and culturally-specific newspaper circulation is 4.2M.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu