Coalition for Diversity to Co-sponsor Conference on Black Psychology

The Coalition for Diversity at Pace University is co-sponsoring a one-day conference titled “Perspectives on Black Psychology: Past, Present and Future” on Friday, April 18 at 8:30 a.m., at 1 Pace Plaza, across from City Hall Park in lower Manhattan. For more information, call (212) 346-1526.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — The Coalition for Diversity at Pace University is co-sponsoring a one-day conference titled “Perspectives on Black Psychology: Past, Present and Future” on Friday, April 18 at 8:30 a.m., at 1 Pace Plaza, across from City Hall Park in lower Manhattan. For more information, call (212) 346-1526.

Dr. William E. Cross Jr., author of Shades of Black: Diversity in African-American Identity, will provide the keynote address on the history, science and politics of black identity research. Cross received a doctorate in psychology from Princeton University. He is a professor in the School of Education at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Other presentation topics will include:

African Psychology
Interpretation of Cultural Mistrust on Interpersonal Work Relationships
Traditional African Religious Systems and African-American Mental Health
Psychotherapy with Africans in America
African-American Male Adolescents in Managing Daily Life Stresses
Hair Texture, Length and Style: Metaphors on the African-American Mother-Daughter Relationship Psychotherapy Applications
African-Centered Group Therapy
Physical Attributes of Racial Stereotypes

The conference is co-sponsored by the New York Association of Black Psychologists, Pace University’s Black Students Organization and the Counseling and Personal Development Center, and the South African Tourism Board of NY.

Pace Lecture Examines Human Perfection from Classical Greek Tradition

Pace University’s Center for Religious Studies is sponsoring a lecture titled “Human Perfection: The Greek Religious and Philosophical Ideal,” on Saturday, April 26 at 7:30 p.m., in the Hayes Library Theater, 78 North Broadway on the White Plains campus. Dr. Andrew Bernstein, an adjunct professor at Pace University, is the guest speaker. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, call (914) 773-3946.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
WHITE PLAINS, NY — Pace University’s Center for Religious Studies is sponsoring a lecture titled “Human Perfection: The Greek Religious and Philosophical Ideal,” on Saturday, April 26 at 7:30 p.m., in the Hayes Library Theater, 78 North Broadway on the White Plains campus. Dr. Andrew Bernstein, an adjunct professor at Pace University, is the guest speaker. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, call (914) 773-3946.

This lecture will examine two themes: What is the nature of human excellence according to the Classical tradition? And how are the insights of the Greeks of value to contemporary quest for meaning?

Bernstein holds a doctorate in philosophy from the Graduate School of the City University of New York. He has lectured and taught throughout the United States and Europe and is completing a novel titled Heart of a Pagan, a study of Homeric values.

The Center for Religious Studies of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences offers scholarly lectures and discussions on all aspects of world religious thought and practice.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Receives $400,000 NEH Challenge Grant

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences has received a $400,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The 4-to-1 matching grant will result in $2 million in endowment for the Dyson College Humanities Education Initiative to support faculty and curriculum development, and to enrich the College’s service-learning program.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences has received a $400,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The 4-to-1 matching grant will result in $2 million in endowment for the Dyson College Humanities Education Initiative to support faculty and curriculum development, and to enrich the College’s service-learning program.

“The University community is proud to be the recipient of the only 1996 NEH Challenge Grant in New York State and is excited by the potential the Humanities Education Initiative represents in advancing liberal arts education at Pace,” said University President Dr. Patricia Ewers. Pace must raise $1.6 million in matching funds to receive the full $400,000 award from the NEH.

Funding will help implement changes to the University’s new core curriculum, and in the development of innovative capstone courses for humanities major programs. Other initiatives include team-teaching and interdisciplinary approaches to enhance faculty-student interaction. The funds also will support new personnel to assist faculty in developing new service-learning curricula for the humanities.

Nationwide, 26 NEH Challenge Grants were awarded in 1996, of which 10 went to institutions of higher education. The NEH Challenge Grant program is one of only two federal programs that awards endowment funds. Since its inception in 1977, the program has distributed $340 million in federal funds, which in turn has generated more than $1.15 billion in support for the nation’s libraries, colleges, museums and other humanities institutions.

This is Pace University’s second NEH Challenge Grant. The first was awarded in 1983 and resulted in nearly $1.3 million in endowment funds for the humanities. These funds continue to support a distinguished chair in philosophy, the Straus Thinking and Learning Center, and humanities faculty and curriculum development activities.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Chemistry Professor Receives Distinguished Scientist Award

David N. Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the graduate program in environmental science at Pace University, has been selected to receive the 1996 Distinguished Scientist Award of the Westchester Chemical Society.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — David N. Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the graduate program in environmental science at Pace University, has been selected to receive the 1996 Distinguished Scientist Award of the Westchester Chemical Society.

The Westchester Chemical Society represents more than 850 chemists and is the charter section of the American Chemical Society.

Dr. Rahni was chosen for the award in recognition of his scholarly contributions to the fields of immobilized enzyme electroanalytical biosensors, nano-engineering, clinical and environmental science, and his promotion of sustainable development.

Dr. Rahni also holds adjunct professorships in the department of dermatology at the New York Medical College and in the LL.M. environmental law program at Pace University School of Law.

The American Chemical Society has named Dr. Rahni as general chair for its 31st Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting, to be held on the University’s Pleasantville campus in May. The event is expected to draw as many as 1,500 scientists for a series of presentations, exhibits and symposia.

In 1993-94, he was a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar at the Technical University of Denmark and a visiting professor at the University of Oxford in England. Dr. Rahni was awarded a visiting professorship to Denmark by the Royal Danish Research Academy in the summer of 1994. He has held visiting scientific positions with IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center and Ciba Additives Research Division and has lectured at the Universities of Rome, Florence and Mexico. He has also been a visiting United Nations Scholar in the Third World, presenting lectures and assisting in curriculum development.

He completed his B.Sc. in chemistry at the National University of Iran, his M.S. in chemistry at Eastern New Mexico University, and his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry at the University of New Orleans in 1985.

Dr. Rahni and his wife, Fay, live in Ossining, NY. They have three children.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Students View Multimedia Presentations as an Effective Teaching Tool

Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Nearly 82 percent of the students surveyed felt that multimedia presentations increased their interest in the material and improved student-teacher interaction, said Psychology Professor Richard Velayo, who conducted the survey. Nearly 64 percent of the students felt that the multimedia format increased their understanding of the subject and helped them organize and take notes.

“Using multimedia presentations is an attempt to engage the students,” said Dr. Velayo, who incorporates computer-generated demonstrations with his lectures and class discussions. Dr. Velayo added that it is important to get students to actively interact with the material presented so they have a sense of control over their learning. He uses a laptop computer, CD-ROM, large-screen televisions, sound, pictures and, occasionally, films and videos to enhance his lectures.

Dr. Velayo surveyed 83 undergraduate and graduate students in his psychology courses on the use of multimedia technology in the classroom. A majority of the students say the computerized presentations enhance the lectures, but a few say it is more difficult to take notes and understand the material.

“Most students like this technology given its novelty,” Dr. Velayo said. “But if they perceive the material to be more interesting as well as promoting increased interaction, it will have a positive affect on their learning.” However, Dr. Velayo warned, this medium can be detrimental if students become passive observers in the process, as if watching television. The educational and social implications of this study’s findings certainly must be explored further, Dr. Velayo said.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.