Dyson College Psychology Professor Offers 3 New Year’s Resolutions for the Office

New Year’s resolutions can be difficult to keep, but here are three to strive for that will make a difference around the office in 1999: · Think and talk positively in the new year “Nothing damages morale of management and workers as readily as negativity,” says Richard Wessler, a psychology professor at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y.

Contact: Public Affairs
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Here are 3 managerial “musts,” says Pace University professor

NEW YORK – New Year’s resolutions can be difficult to keep, but here are three
to strive for that will make a difference around the office in 1999:

· Think and talk positively in the new year
“Nothing damages morale of management and workers as readily as negativity,” says
Richard Wessler, a psychology professor at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y.
“A positive outlook influences everyone to think and feel that way too.” Many people
do not realize that optimism is a choice Wessler says. Tackle tough tasks and office
problems after a positive outlook is in place.

· Resolve to work toward harmony in the workplace
“Make sure that everyone gets fair and equal treatment. Employees who feel short-changed
often unconsciously try to even the score,” Wessler says. Your job as boss is to make people
feel wanted, appreciated and productive.

· Try something new
“Remind yourself that this is a new year and a good time for a fresh start. Changes do not
have to be big in order to be psychologically refreshing,” Wessler says. Something as small
as turning your desk in a new direction or changing the pictures on the wall will do. Break
out of familiar patterns, try changing your lunch hour or wearing something new.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester
County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in
the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and
Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the
World Trade Institute.

Dyson College Conference to Focus on Impact of New York Health Care Reform Act on Health Facilities, Dec. 11

Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education and Research
will present a conference titled “The New York Health Care Reform Act: Its Impact? Its
Future?” on Friday, December 11 from 8:15 to 11:30 a.m., at the Lubin Graduate Center,
1 Martine Avenue, White Plains. The cost of the program is $50. For more information
or to register, call (914) 422-4298.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
WHITE PLAINS, NY – Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education and Research
will present a conference titled “The New York Health Care Reform Act: Its Impact? Its
Future?” on Friday, December 11 from 8:15 to 11:30 a.m., at the Lubin Graduate Center,
1 Martine Avenue, White Plains. The cost of the program is $50. For more information
or to register, call (914) 422-4298.

The New York Health Care Reform Act (NYHCRA) went into effect in January 1997, replacing
the New York Prospective Hospital Reimbursement Methodology (NYPHRM). The intent of NYHCRA
was to move New York’s health care industry toward a more competitive, market-driven system
of negotiated rates by making fundamental changes in the reimbursement regulations; a revolution,
it was predicted, in health care financing.

Now, nearly two years after its enactment, it is time to examine the impact of NYHCRA on the
health care industry. How has NYHCRA affected the operations of hospitals and managed care
organizations? Have the objectives of New York state been achieved? What does the future hold?
How does the business community view the impact?

These questions will be examined by a panel of experts representing hospitals, managed care, state
government and business, in a format of individual presentations, panel discussion and audience Q&A.
Speakers include Deborah Konopko, first assistant counsel to the governor; Mark Van Guysling, assistant
director, Division of Health Care Financing, NYS Department of Health; Arthur E. Weintraub, president,
Northern Metropolitan Hospital Association; Kathryn Allen, immediate past president, HMO Council and
Conference of New York; and Elliott Shaw, director of government affairs, NYS Business Council. Serving
as moderator will be Prof. Bernard M. Weinstein, director of the Center for Health Policy Education and Research.

The conference is co-sponsored with the Northern Metropolitan Hospital Association and the New York Society
for Health Planning.

The Center for Health Policy Education and Research was founded in 1996 by the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’
Department of Public Administration in order to advance health care policy education and research activities at
Pace University, and to assist health care providers in the Greater New York area in meeting the demands of the community.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City, and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000
students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School
of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of
Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Classical Music Highlights Dyson College Lecture, Nov. 18

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences
will sponsor a lecture titled “The Miracle of Mozart and Beethoven: The
Classical Era in Music,” from 7:30-9 p.m., Wednesday, November 18, in the
Choate House Art Gallery, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville. It is free and
open to the public. For more information, call (914) 773-3781.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences
will sponsor a lecture titled “The Miracle of Mozart and Beethoven: The
Classical Era in Music,” from 7:30-9 p.m., Wednesday, November 18, in the
Choate House Art Gallery, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville. It is free and
open to the public. For more information, call (914) 773-3781.

Concert pianist Judith Alstadter, professor of music and artist-in-residence
in the theater and fine arts department at Pace University’s Dyson College of
Arts and Sciences, will explore the classical works of Mozart and Beethoven
using recorded musical examples and video excerpts.

Alstadter is a graduate of the Juilliard School, and she received her doctoral
degree from Yale Music School. She has performed in the United States, Europe
and the Caribbean. Her Allice Tully Hall series, devoted to the complete piano
works of Gabriel Fauré, was widely acclaimed. She is founder and director of the
Minneswaska Chamber Music Society, which performs classics to jazz repertoire.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate
and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin
School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of
Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Pace University Students Transform Journalism Department into Newsroom for Election Day Coverage, Nov. 3

Journalism students at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and
Sciences will try their hands as cub reporters on Election Day when they cover local and
state races for a special student-written newspaper. Eleven students in the Advanced
Reporting class will participate in the project, which has become a tradition for the
journalism department.

Posted by Public Affairs on October 31, 1998 at 12:01:30:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Journalism students at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and
Sciences will try their hands as cub reporters on Election Day when they cover local and
state races for a special student-written newspaper. Eleven students in the Advanced
Reporting class will participate in the project, which has become a tradition for the
journalism department.

Since 1983, journalism students have published “Westchester Pace,” an eight-page newspaper
that is distributed throughout Westchester County on the Friday following Election Day.
This year, Pace students will cover the elections for the U.S. Senate, New York Governor,
New York Assembly, congressional districts and other local races.

“All of the writing, photography and page layouts are done by students,” said Denis Hurley,
a Pace University journalism professor and faculty advisor for the project. “We found this
to be one of the best and most effective educational tools to give students real-world
journalism experience,” Hurley said.

Each student is stationed at a candidate’s headquarters in order to be on the scene as the
votes are tallied. They have the chance to witness the excitement and talk to candidates,
just as professional reporters do. Students then return to the “newsroom” and file their
articles, while others report from the field. The paper is completed that night.

In 1996, one Pace student flew to Arkansas to report from the Democratic Headquarters with
Bill Clinton, while another student flew to Kansas to cover the Republican Headquarters with
Bob Dole.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional
degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer
Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the
World Trade Institute.

Letters from Africa: Dyson College Faculty Correspond with Pace University Community via Internet

Two Pace University faculty members are visiting South
Africa as part of the People to People Ambassador Program, and are corresponding
with the University community via the Internet. Dr. Jane Collins and Dr. Doretta
Cornell from the literature and communications department in the Dyson College of
Arts and Sciences, are electronically writing letters home, describing people they
meet and things they learn about this newly reborn nation. Letters are posted to
a web site every few days from October 20th-November 1st (Read letters by logging
on to: http://library.pace.edu/~litcom/collins/letters.htm#letters).

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Two Pace University faculty members are visiting South
Africa as part of the People to People Ambassador Program, and are corresponding
with the University community via the Internet. Dr. Jane Collins and Dr. Doretta
Cornell from the literature and communications department in the Dyson College of
Arts and Sciences, are electronically writing letters home, describing people they
meet and things they learn about this newly reborn nation. Letters are posted to
a web site every few days from October 20th-November 1st (Read letters by logging
on to: http://library.pace.edu/~litcom/collins/letters.htm#letters).

Collins, Cornell and the American delegation are meeting with representatives of
the South African Department of Education to discuss the role of English language
education in the new South Africa, the revision of school curricula and entrance
exams based on English usage, and cultural issues in the teaching of English literature
and language in a diverse and divided country. During their two-week trip, they will
visit universities and high schools, including a sojourn in the township of Soweto, the
site of the 1976 massacre of black school children who were protesting the inferior
education for blacks under apartheid.

The People to People Ambassador Program began in the Eisenhower era and aims to bring
American educators together with their counterparts in other countries. This delegation
is composed of teachers specializing in English language and literature. The delegation
will be in South Africa from October 18th to October 29th and will meet with South African
educators in Johannesburg and Cape Town.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and
professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of
Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School
of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Members of New York Philharmonic to Perform Chamber Music at Pace University

Members of the New York Philharmonic and Pace music faculty member/artist-in-residence will perform “Chamber Music for a Sunday Afternoon” at Pace University on Sunday, November 8th at 3:00 p.m. Works by Mozart, Haydn and Mendelssohn will be performed by New York Philharmonic members Kenneth Gordon,
Qiang Tu, and Pace music professor and artist-in-residence Judith Alstadter. The concert is presented by Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Theatre and Fine Arts Department. General admission is $10 and $6 for students and senior citizens. All proceeds will benefit the Alan J. Abrams
Theatre Scholarship Fund. The performance will be held at The Pace Downtown Theater, located in the Schimmel Center for the Arts on Spruce Street in lower Manhattan (between Gold Street and Park Row). For more information, please call the Theater and Fine Arts Department at (212) 346-1352 or the box office at (212) 346-1715.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696
News@Pace.Edu
NEW YORK – Members of the New York Philharmonic and Pace music
faculty member/artist-in-residence will perform “Chamber Music
for a Sunday Afternoon” at Pace University on Sunday, November
8th at 3:00 p.m. Works by Mozart, Haydn and Mendelssohn will
be performed by New York Philharmonic members Kenneth Gordon,
Qiang Tu, and Pace music professor and artist-in-residence
Judith Alstadter. The concert is presented by Pace University’s
Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Theatre and Fine Arts
Department. General admission is $10 and $6 for students and
senior citizens. All proceeds will benefit the Alan J. Abrams
Theatre Scholarship Fund. The performance will be held at The
Pace Downtown Theater, located in the Schimmel Center for the
Arts on Spruce Street in lower Manhattan (between Gold Street
and Park Row). For more information, please call the Theater
and Fine Arts Department at (212) 346-1352 or the box office
at (212) 346-1715.

Kenneth Gordon has played violin with the Philharmonic since
1961, and was named assistant concertmaster in 1971. Qiang
Tu, a Chinese native, served as principal cellist for the
Princeton Chamber Symphony and has appeared in Chicago, St.
Louis and New York. Tu joined the New York Philharmonic in
1995. Pianist Judith Alstadter has performed concerts in the
U.S. (including Lincoln Center and Carnegie Recital Hall),
Europe and the Caribbean. Alstadter is a graduate of Julliard
and Yale music schools. She will perform Mozart’s piano sonata.
Together the three will perform trios for violin, cello and
piano by Haydn and Mendelssohn.

Audience members are invited to a “Meet the Artists” reception
after the concert. Light refreshments will be served.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses
in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000
students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and
professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts
and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer
Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School
of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade
Institute.

Pace University Researchers Find New Ways to Kill Oral Viruses

Over-the-counter toothpaste and mouth rinses may fight cavities
and kill bad breath, but most are virtually harmless against viruses.
Researchers at Pace University have found that by adding naturally occurring
substances – such as aloe, zinc or grapefruit extract – to oral hygiene
products, they destroy harmful viruses that lead to illness.

Contact: Public Affairs

(212) 346-1637

NEW YORK – Over-the-counter toothpaste and mouth rinses may fight cavities
and kill bad breath, but most are virtually harmless against viruses.
Researchers at Pace University have found that by adding naturally occurring
substances – such as aloe, zinc or grapefruit extract – to oral hygiene
products, they destroy harmful viruses that lead to illness.

“Adding these natural agents to mouthwashes, rinses and toothpaste can prevent
the onslaught of disease-causing microorganisms in the mouth,” said Milton
Schiffenbauer, professor of biology at Pace University’s New York City campus.
“Our findings have a significant impact on oral hygiene care and its emerging
role in chronic systemic diseases, due to the fact that many viruses found in
the body enter through the mouth.”

Recent medical research has shown that bacterial infections in the mouth may
lead to blood clots that can bring on heart attacks and strokes. Several studies
conducted since 1989 suggest that people with periodontal disease also have an
increased risk of heart disease and stroke.

Schiffenbauer and his undergraduate students at Pace University’s Dyson College
of Arts and Sciences presented their findings at the 1998 General Meeting of the
American Society for Microbiology in Atlanta in May.

For the past several years scientists in Pace University’s biology department have
conducted research on oral microbiology and viruses. They have tested a variety of
oral agents for their antiviral properties, and determined that most are ineffective.
In fact, several have the opposite effect, and actually provide protection for
viruses under certain conditions.

Their research focused on two viruses (bacteriophages T1 and T7) that attack bacteria.
Extracts of zinc, aloe, and grapefruit were separately added to toothpaste and combined
in test tubes with the viruses. After 10 minutes of storage at room temperature,
refrigeration or sub-freezing conditions, T1 and T7 viruses were virtually inactivated.

This research serves as a model to investigate viral and bacterial infections of the oral
cavity. Pace researchers will expand their study to include other common forms of viruses
that may weaken the gums and allow entry of harmful bacteria.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and
professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of
Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School
of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.



[ Pace University Message Board ]


Researchers at Pace University have found that by adding naturally occurring

Dyson College to Offer Conference on Consumer Protection and Managed Care

Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education
and Research will present a conference on “Consumer Protection in an Era
of Managed Care and Provider Networks,” on Friday, June 19 from 8:15 to
11:30 a.m., at the University’s Graduate Center, 1 Martine Avenue, White
Plains. Registration cost is $50. For more information or to register,
call (914) 422-4298.

Posted by Public Affairs on April 27, 1998 at 18:29:01:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – Pace University’s Center for Health Policy Education
and Research will present a conference on “Consumer Protection in an Era
of Managed Care and Provider Networks,” on Friday, June 19 from 8:15 to
11:30 a.m., at the University’s Graduate Center, 1 Martine Avenue, White
Plains. Registration cost is $50. For more information or to register,
call (914) 422-4298.

Guest speakers will include the Hon. Alexander “Pete” Grannis, chair of
the New York State Assembly Committee on Insurance; R. Channing Wheeler,
CEO and president of tristate operations of United Healthcare, a national
health management company serving all 50 states; Arthur E. Weintraub,
president of the Northern Metropolitan Hospital Association, representing
more than 60 health care institutions in the Hudson Valley; and Francis J.
Serbaroli, Esq., partner in the law firm of Cadwalader, Wichersham & Taft,
and a vice chairman of the New York State Public Health Council.

The conference is co-sponsored with the Northern Metropolitan Hospital
Association and the New York Society for Health Planning. Topics will
include state and federal consumer protection legislation, how managed care
monitors quality and consumer satisfaction, and the essentials of consumer
protection.

The Center for Health Policy Education and Research was founded in 1996 by
the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Public Administration.
The Center advances health care policy education and research activities at
Pace University, and assists health care providers in the New York Metropolitan
area in meeting the demands of the community.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate,
graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Science,
Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems,
School of Education, School of Law, and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace to Host American Chemical Society Meeting with Drug Discovery Theme

The 31st American Chemical Society Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting (MARM‘97), hosted jointly by the ACS New York Section and Pace University, will be held May 27-30, on the Pace University campus in Pleasantville, NY. The general conference theme is “Drug Discovery.”

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1268

PLEASANTVILLE, NY — The 31st American Chemical Society Middle
Atlantic Regional Meeting (MARM‘97), hosted jointly by the ACS New
York Section and Pace University, will be held May 27-30, on the
Pace University campus in Pleasantville, NY. The general conference
theme is “Drug Discovery.”

Ronald Breslow, the past ACS president, Joan Shields, the ACS board
chair, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., Pace University professor of
environmental law, and Allen J. Main of Novartis are the plenary and
keynote speakers.

The event, being held for the first time in Westchester County, is
expected to draw as many as 1,500 scientists and students from
around the country and abroad for a series of 300 presentations,
exhibits, symposia and events. More than 250 technical papers will be
delivered and plenary symposia have been planned on various topics,
including new approaches in drug discovery, chiral separation and
technology, internationalization of chemistry and biotechnology,
science education and societal responsibility and sustainable
development. The ACS is the world’s largest scientific society with a
membership of 150,000 professionals with an annual gross budget in
excess of $300 million.

Dr. David Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of
the Pace graduate program in environmental science, was selected by
the ACS to be the general chair of MARM ‘97.

According to the MARM ‘97 Student Project Director Anthony Stapon, a
Pace chemistry student, there will be an added component to the
meeting called the Student Affiliates Program which will consist of
various educational and social activities. More than 500 students
and 200 colleges and universities in the middle Atlantic region have
been invited to participate. On tap for the affiliate program are
presentations, discussions and workshops on: Internet resources
available to students, research projects, graduate school selection
and application, employment opportunities in the chemical industry,
interviewing and resume writing plus an excursion to the New York
City Sony IMAX Theater and a tour of the Pace Environmental Center
facilities.

Commencement Marks 90th Anniversary for Pace University

Pace University will conclude its 90th Anniversary celebration with commencement exercises on May 20, 23 and 24 during three separate ceremonies in New York City and Westchester County. In addition to conferring more than 3,300 undergraduate, graduate, professional and doctoral degrees to the Class of 1997, the University will award seven honorary doctoral degrees.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University will conclude its 90th Anniversary celebration with commencement exercises on May 20, 23 and 24 during three separate ceremonies in New York City and Westchester County. In addition to conferring more than 3,300 undergraduate, graduate, professional and doctoral degrees to the Class of 1997, the University will award seven honorary doctoral degrees.

On Tuesday, May 20, at 1:30 p.m., at the Westchester County Center in White Plains, the University will award degrees to students from the Pleasantville/Briarcliff campus and the Lubin Graduate Center in White Plains. Former New York Assembly-woman Cecile D. Singer, and the Honorable Shirley S. Chater, former commissioner of the Social Security Administration and a Regents’ Professor at the University of California, will be awarded the honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Pace President Dr. Patricia O. Ewers will provide the commencement address.

On Friday, May 23, at 11 a.m., on the White Plains campus, the University will award degrees to students in the School of Law. Honorary Doctor of Laws will be awarded to Drew S. Days III, a Yale Law School professor and former United States solicitor general and former assistant attorney general for civil rights in the U.S. Department of Justice; Peter Basil Carter, emeritus fellow at Wadham College in Oxford, England, a professor with the Pace London Law Program and a former justice of the peace of the County of Oxford; and John Otis Honnold Jr., professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Law and former head of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law. Drew S. Days III will provide the address.

On Saturday, May 24, at 1:30 p.m., at Radio City Music Hall, degrees will be awarded to students from the University’s New York City campus. Charles Jacey Jr., a senior partner with Coopers & Lybrand and a Pace University Trustee and alumnus, will receive an honorary Doctor of Commercial Science; and Jonathan Kozol, educator and author of many books on urban education including Savage Inequalities: Children in America’s Schools, will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters. Pace President Dr. Patricia O. Ewers will provide the commencement address.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.