Washington Times: “Aaron Alexis’ history renews debate between mental issues, gun crimes”

. . . “He did go to a very dangerous facility, a place that would be quite dangerous for him. He’s going to a place where he most likely will be jeopardizing his own life,” said Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an associate professor of psychology at Pace. “This was not a movie theater where you can get in and get out. This is a highly guarded facility. There most likely was some self-destructive intent here.”

. . . “He did go to a very dangerous facility, a place that would be quite dangerous for him. He’s going to a place where he most likely will be jeopardizing his own life,” said Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an associate professor of psychology at Pace University in New York City. “This was not a movie theater where you can get in and get out. This is a highly guarded facility. There most likely was some self-destructive intent here.”

Read the article in the Washington Times.

NEWS RELEASE: The Pacific Century – Pace Announces Global Asia Studies Major

This fall the Department of History on Pace University’s New York City campus launched a new major – Global Asia Studies, a program designed for the study of Asian cultures, languages, histories and economies.

The Pacific Century – Pace University Announces Global Asia Studies Major

NEW YORK – The 21st century is described as the Pacific Century – a century dominated, especially economically, by the rise of modern Asia-Pacific countries such as China, Japan, South Korea, India and Taiwan.  In recognition of this eastward turn, this fall the Department of History on Pace University’s New York City campus launched a new major – Global Asia Studies, a program designed for the study of Asian cultures, languages, histories and economies. The new program will focus on the development of bilingual specialists and the development of experts in comparative Asian cultures.

“In today’s global economy, the competitive advantage favors those who have foreign language skills and knowledge of international cultures in addition to their own.  The breadth and depth of the Global Asia Studies program will equip graduates with both,” Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Dean Nira Herrmann said.

Global Asia Studies is multidisciplinary and includes faculty from disciplines such as history, modern languages, literature, economics, and communication studies.  “Our program is unique among Asian studies because it focuses on the interconnectedness of Asian cultures and their links to the rest of the world,” said Ronald K. Frank, program co-director.

The program offers two tracks: The Asian Languages and Cultures track and the Comparative Asian Studies track. The Asian Languages and Cultures track is geared toward students who wish to become bilingual specialists.  The Comparative Asian Studies is tailored to students who wish to pursue professional careers in government, multinational institutions or academic careers. Curricular activities may be enriched with local internships and travel abroad opportunities.

Students majoring in Global Asia Studies will find numerous job opportunities in multinational corporations, international law, government, medicine, science, higher education, and cultural institutions.

“Pace University has always been an innovator, and this exciting new program reflects Dyson College’s commitment to grow and evolve with the world around it,” said Global Asia Studies co-director Joseph T. Lee.

To learn more about the program, call Ronald K. Frank or Joseph T. Lee. Dr. Frank can be reached at (212) 346-1463 or by email at rfrank2@pace.edu. Dr. Lee can be reached at (212) 346-1827 or by email at jlee@pace.edu. Visit the website at http://www.pace.edu/dyson/academic-departments-and-programs/history/ba-in-global-asia-studies.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional sciences (including pre-medicine and pre-law), as well as many courses that fulfil core curriculum requirements. The college offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Visit www.pace.edu.

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

The Daily Pleasantville: Pace Introduces First Mental Health Counseling Doctoral Degree In N.Y.

Pace University’s Pleasantville campus has introduced the first doctoral degree in mental health counseling in New York State, in the just-begun fall term. (Left: Pace Professor Ross Robak, Ph.D., and students in the university’s new mental health counseling Ph.D. program.)

Pace University’s Pleasantville campus has introduced the first doctoral degree in mental health counseling in New York State, in the just-begun fall term.

As part of the psychology department of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, the program is designed to provide master’s-level students with advanced professional and scholarly training.

“Doctoral-level mental health counselors bring a depth and breadth of understanding to their work with clients as practitioners, as well as to the research of new therapeutic modalities,” says Rostyslaw Robak, department chair and professor of psychology on the Pleasantville campus. “The program will enrich our graduates’ ability to work successfully with clients and to develop new ways to treat mental health conditions that have the potential to significantly advance the field of mental health counseling.”

The doctoral program is open to applicants with a master’s degree in mental-health counseling or a closely related field. The program offers teaching, research and administrative assistantships with partial tuition remission.

To learn more about the program, call 914-422-4283, email gradwp@pace.edu, or visit www.pace.edu/phdmhc.

Read the full original article here.

Asbury Park Press (NJ): “5 tips for beating the back-to-school blues”

“While for most folks, the summer symbolizes rest and relaxation, back to school time can serve as a jolt back to the reality of routine life,” writes Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

“While for most folks, the summer symbolizes rest and relaxation, back to school time can serve as a jolt back to the reality of routine life, writes Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University. “As the first school weeks pass, it is not uncommon to feel as if the outside world is gaining momentum, spinning fast and with more force. School season represents commitment and activity, often-increased stress because there never seems to be enough time.

Read the article: Asbury Park Press

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Hesitating over Syria: Ethnic dimensions of the conflict and a need for patience”

“Members of Congress should hesitate before forcing the hands of President Obama to act on the Syria conflict before it is the right time,” writes Michael Izady, a professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University. Izady is an expert on the Middle East who helps train and brief Special Forces troops and others in the U.S. military here and overseas on ethnic and social issues.

“Members of Congress should hesitate before forcing the hands of President Obama to act on the Syria conflict before it is the right time,” writes Michael Izady, a professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University. “The worst scenario is to bring more chaos by toppling the Assad regime while having no viable and desirable alternative to him in the opposition to guard the interests of all Syrians of all religious and ethnic persuasions.”

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

BabyCenter blog: “Shouting at kids, especially teens, gets the wrong results”

“When parents yell and scream at their children, or at others with whom they interact, their child gets the message that this is appropriate behavior,” Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, professor of psychology at Pace University. “In turn these children may interact similarly with their peers, parents, teachers, and coaches.”

. . . Lots of psychologists are weighing in on this topic, as did Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, professor of psychology at Pace University and co-author of “Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.”

Children learn by watching their parents, Powell-Lunder reminds us:

“When parents yell and scream at their children, or at others with whom they interact, their child gets the message that this is appropriate behavior. In turn these children may interact similarly with their peers, parents, teachers, and coaches.”

A better alternative, in an ideal world, is to stay supportive and calm:

“The best approach to encouraging positive behaviors in children and teens is twofold. First, parents need to practice what they preach. Secondly, parents need to create a structured and supportive environment for their kids. Such an environment includes clear rules, consequences and of course reinforcement through praise and continued encouragement.”

Read more on the BabyCenter blog

DirectionsMag.com: “Pace University GIS Basics MOOC Launches Sept 9”

Peggy Minnis, who introduced the idea of a “GIS 101” sort of course to readers back in April, is currently welcoming students to the real McCoy. Her “GIS Basics” massive open online course (MOOC) begins September 9 and runs for 12 weeks. The course focuses on key GIS skills using ArcGIS for Desktop.

Peggy Minnis, who introduced the idea of a “GIS 101” sort of course to readers back in April, is currently welcoming students to the real McCoy. Her “GIS Basics” massive open online course (MOOC) begins September 9 and runs for 12 weeks. The course focuses on key GIS skills using ArcGIS for Desktop.

Read the article on DirectionsMag.com.

 

Epoch Times: “US Rethinking Aid, Weapons Exports Amid Egypt Violence”

. . . Michael Izady, professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University, believes that when it comes to Egypt’s military, the United States still has leverage. [left: Egyptian troops keep watch at a checkpoint during the curfew hours in Cairo late on Aug. 19. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

. . . Michael Izady, professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University, believes that when it comes to Egypt’s military, the United States still has leverage.

“We have a fair amount of influence on the Egyptian military, but also the secular, progressive strata of the Egyptian society,” he said.

Read the story by Epoch Times.

NEWS RELEASE: Actors Studio Drama School Alumni Produce “For a Good Time, Call Kathy Blanchard”

Actors Studio Drama School alumni have joined together to produce a new play that will premiere August 9th at the New York International Fringe Festival. Every member of the production– the writer, director, actors, and designers– are alumni of the Actors Studio Drama School.

OUTSIDE INSIDE PRESENTS

FOR A GOOD TIME, CALL KATHY BLANCHARD

a new play by Michael Ross Albert

 

NEW YORK – Outside Inside returns to the New York International Fringe Festival with the world premiere of Michael Ross Albert’s new play, For a Good Time, Call Kathy Blanchard.

Directed by the company’s founding co-artistic director, Kaitlyn Samuel, the production stars Ross Wellinger, Kaitlyn Huczko, and two lifetime members of the legendary Actors Studio, Hannah Timmons and David Dempsey.

Set during the fourth game of the Stanley Cup Finals in a house undergoing major renovations, For a Good Time, Call Kathy Blanchard is a comedy about hockey, heartbreak, and the places we used to call home. The script was one of the Top Ten plays shortlisted for the Toronto Fringe Festival’s Best New Play Contest.

Lawrence is having a meltdown. Sky’s been kicked out of his house. Amanda’s career seems to be going nowhere. Mary refuses to leave until someone wins the Stanley Cup. And they’re all preparing for a devastating loss. But, Lawrence has a plan…

A combination of boisterous slapstick and surprising emotional honesty, For a Good Time, Call Kathy Blanchard is a play about a generation at split ends, trying to re-discover where they come from, and decide where they’re headed.

Playwright Michael Ross Albert is the author of several plays including The Big Sandy River Plays (Jenny Wiley Theatre), Screech (finalist, Samuel French OOB Festival) and Tough Jews (The Unit, Toronto). His one-act play, Starfishes, is included in the 2010-2011 anthology of Best American Short Plays. He received an MFA in Playwriting from the Actors Studio Drama School, and is an associate member of the Dramatists Guild of America.

Presented as part of the New York International Fringe Festival, For a Good Time, Call Kathy Blanchard will be performed at Venue #10: The Kraine Theatre (85 East 4th St) on August 10 at 12:30; August 11 at 10:15; August 12 at 5:00; August 15 at 7:00; and August 24 at 4:00.  For a detailed performance schedule and to purchase tickets, visit www.fringenyc.org or call 866.468.7619.

Every member of the production– writer, director, actors, designers– are alumni of the Actors Studio Drama School which is currently housed at Pace University.

Outside Inside is a New York City based theatre company, founded by co-artistic directors Kaitlyn Samuel, Michael Ross Albert, and Adam Levi.  Their inaugural production was Chagrin by Michael Ross Albert, which was presented in association with HUBO Productions at the 2011 New York International Fringe Festival. They returned to FringeNYC in 2012 with the critically acclaimed adaptation of Arch Oboler’s science-fiction melodrama, Night of the Auk. The company and its artists are dedicated to the independent production of exciting new works for the stage.

Twitter: @OutsideInsideCo

CONTACT: Robert Schorr

PHONE: (818) 427 -3206

EMAIL: 13-1916@fringenyc.org

NPR Talk of the Nation: “Breaking Bad News To Kids: How Media Has Tweaked The Process”

Parents have always had to break hard news to kids, from family hardships to national tragedies. Now there are more ways for children to learn about news faster — through 24 hour news and social media. So, what’s changed in how parents broach these subjects? How can media help, or hurt? Listen to an interview with Jennifer Powell-Lunder, clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Pace University.

Parents have always had to break hard news to kids, from family hardships to national tragedies. Now there are more ways for children to learn about news faster — through 24 hour news and social media. So, what’s changed in how parents broach these subjects? How can media help, or hurt? Listen to an interview with Jennifer Powell-Lunder, clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Pace University.