China Daily: “Pace Confucius Institute turns 4”

. . . “We’re really expanding,” Nira Herrmann, dean of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace, said in a speech at the celebration. “The Confucius Institute, on its fourth anniversary, has really made an impact on Pace, as well as our community and on our programming.”

Pace University in 2009 opened the first Confucius Institute in New York City, and on Saturday, guests gathered for an on-campus birthday party in Manhattan’s financial district.

“We’re really expanding,” Nira Herrmann, dean of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace, said in a speech at the celebration. “The Confucius Institute, on its fourth anniversary, has really made an impact on Pace, as well as our community and on our programming.”

Read the story by China Daily.

NEWS RELEASE: Confucius Institute at Pace University to Celebrate 4th Year Anniversary

The Confucius Institute at Pace University will celebrate four years of successful programming and classes on Saturday May 4, from 3-5 PM, on the downtown New York City campus at 1 Pace Plaza in the Multipurpose Room (B-Level, 3 Spruce Street, New York).

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:
Mr. Ansel Lurio
Program Coordinator
Confucius Institute at Pace University
alurio@pace.edu

__________________________________________________________________

 

Confucius Institute at Pace University to Celebrate 4th Year Anniversary:

Featuring Calligraphy, Games, Raffle, Cake-Cutting, and a Class Demonstration

With a Keynote Speech by NYU Professor Ann Lee, Author of the Acclaimed Book, What the U.S. Can Learn from China

NEW YORK, NY, April 25, 2013 — The Confucius Institute at Pace University will celebrate four years of successful programming and classes on Saturday May 4, from 3-5 PM, on the downtown New York City campus at 1 Pace Plaza in the Multipurpose Room (B-Level, 3 Spruce Street, New York).

The event will feature a keynote address by Ann Lee, Adjunct Professor of Economics and Finance at New York University, as well as an awards ceremony, demonstration class, cake-cutting, and raffle.

Doors will open at 2:30pm, wherein guests are welcome to observe demonstrations of calligraphy and traditional Chinese games, and enjoy refreshments before the official programming kicks off at 3:00pm.  Confucius Institute teacher, Ms. Xiaojun Wang, will start by leading a brief Chinese class demonstration.  Ann Lee will then give the keynote address, based on her book, What the U.S. Can Learn from China: An Open-Minded Guide to Treating Our Greatest Competitor as Our Greatest Teacher.  Lee will discuss how China’s education and economic policies can be studied to positively impact our own.   Professor Lee is a prolific commentator on economic issues in various forms of media (Bloomberg, CNN, NPR, The New York Times, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal), and has been an invited speaker at numerous industry and academic conferences.  Wrapping up the event, will be a graduation award presentation for Confucius Institute students and an anniversary cake cutting ceremony.

The event will be open to the public but anyone who wishes to attend should RSVP to either ci@pace.edu or 212-346-1880.  Details about the Confucius Institute at Pace University can be found at www.pace.edu/confucius.  More information about Ann Lee and her book is available at professorannlee.com.

About the Confucius Institute at Pace University

Located at the financial, civic, and cultural center of Manhattan, The Confucius Institute at Pace University is the first university-based institute of its kind in New York City. Founded in partnership with China’s Phoenix Publishing and Media Group, Pace’s Confucius Institute integrates pedagogical, scholarly, and professional expertise to promote the learning of Chinese language and culture and to facilitate cross-cultural understanding between people in the United States and China.

About Pace

Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, N.Y., enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems.

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The Hill’s Congress Blog: “US must impose moratorium and seek global ban on killer robots”

“U.S. lawmakers must act quickly to protect us from the threat of killer robot proliferation by urging the president to transform a strengthened and loophole-free version of the DoD policy into national law,” writes Matthew Bolton of Pace.

“U.S. lawmakers must act quickly to protect us from the threat of killer robot proliferation by urging the president to transform a strengthened and loophole-free version of the DoD policy into national law,”  writes Matthew Bolton, assistant professor of Political Science, Pace University, New York City. “The president should use the policy to seek a comprehensive international ban on these weapons before it is too late.”

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

Newsday: “Sean Patrick Maloney campaign funds coming overwhelmingly from outside pol’s district”

. . . Christopher Malone, a professor and chairman of the political science department at Pace University in Manhattan, said members of Congress are required to live within the district they represent but are free to accept campaign contributions from outside the district or even other states.

. . . Christopher Malone, a professor and chairman of the political science department at Pace University in Manhattan, said members of Congress are required to live within the district they represent but are free to accept campaign contributions from outside the district or even other states.

“Obviously, it would look better for him if most of his money was coming from inside the district,” Malone said. “But as a freshman congressman, he is vulnerable, and my guess is that he will be trying to raise money from wherever he can to prevent a likely challenge in the next election.”

Malone said the carpetbagging label has more impact on an insurgent candidate than a sitting congressman.

“If someone who is going to run against him is going to use this in campaign literature, I don’t think it’s going to go very far,” Malone said. “He has another 18 months to prove himself to the district, to show that he does work hard for his constituents. He’s really going to be judged on what he delivers for the district, rather than where he gets his money from.”

Read the article in Newsday.

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Arms Trade Treaty: Keeping weapons from terrorists and human rights abusers”

“Last week, the U.S. and 154 other member states in the U.N. General Assembly voted to endorse an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) that would reduce the flow of conventional weapons to states or groups engaged in terrorist activities, organized crime or gross violations of human rights and humanitarian law,” writes Matthew Bolton of Pace.

(Photo: Delegates at the United Nations applauded the passage of a treaty aimed at regulating the $70 billion global weapons trade.)

Last week, the U.S. and 154 other member states in the U.N. General Assembly voted to endorse an Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) that would reduce the flow of conventional weapons to states or groups engaged in terrorist activities, organized crime or gross violations of human rights and humanitarian law,” writes Matthew Bolton, assistant professor of political science at Pace.

“The arms trade is currently less regulated than the trade in bananas and bubble gum. This threatens U.S. security by enabling extremists, drug traffickers and pariah states to obtain weapons easily. Lack of global standards also hurts the U.S. arms industry, undercut by companies operating in more permissive regulatory environments.”

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

China Daily: “Chinese language conference to kick off”

. . . “I think that Americans are increasingly realizing the interconnectedness between countries in a more globalized world, particularly between the US and China,” said Lindsay Bennett, program manager at the Confucius Institute at New York’s Pace University.

. . . “I think that Americans are increasingly realizing the interconnectedness between countries in a more globalized world, particularly between the US and China,” said Lindsay Bennett, program manager at the Confucius Institute at New York’s Pace University. “Savvier students understand and appreciate how learning a foreign language can only be an asset to them as they prepare to enter the real world,” she said. Bennett, who began to study Chinese in the mid-1990s, will be among the participants in Boston.

“For my role, gaining further understanding of challenges and successes within Chinese language education can be helpful to my work,” she said. “To see so many others in one place with a similar dedication to Chinese language education and furthering US-China understanding will be impressive.”

Read the article by China Daily.

CBC Radio (Canada): “Should the West arm the Syrian opposition?”

Paul Londrigan, a professor of political science at Pace, spoke to CBC Radio about how the West should be weary of arming the Syrian opposition. He pointed to instances in history where similar moves have made conflicts worse.

Paul Londrigan, a professor of political science at Pace, spoke to CBC Radio about how the West should be weary of arming the Syrian opposition. He pointed to instances in history where similar moves have made conflicts worse.

Listen to the interview.

 

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “US repeating mistakes of past in Syria”

“Once again America is training non-governmental forces; Syrians in Jordan,” writes Paul Londrigan, a professor of political science at Pace University. “And implicitly America is again allowing others to arm this unknown and unaccountable quantity in the region of the Middle East.”

“Once again America is training non-governmental forces; Syrians in Jordan,” writes Paul Londrigan, a professor of political science at Pace University. “And implicitly America is again allowing others to arm this unknown and unaccountable quantity in the region of the Middle East.”
Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.