Asbury Park Press (NJ): “5 tips for beating the back-to-school blues”

“While for most folks, the summer symbolizes rest and relaxation, back to school time can serve as a jolt back to the reality of routine life,” writes Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

“While for most folks, the summer symbolizes rest and relaxation, back to school time can serve as a jolt back to the reality of routine life, writes Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University. “As the first school weeks pass, it is not uncommon to feel as if the outside world is gaining momentum, spinning fast and with more force. School season represents commitment and activity, often-increased stress because there never seems to be enough time.

Read the article: Asbury Park Press

The Hill’s Congress Blog: “Hesitating over Syria: Ethnic dimensions of the conflict and a need for patience”

“Members of Congress should hesitate before forcing the hands of President Obama to act on the Syria conflict before it is the right time,” writes Michael Izady, a professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University. Izady is an expert on the Middle East who helps train and brief Special Forces troops and others in the U.S. military here and overseas on ethnic and social issues.

“Members of Congress should hesitate before forcing the hands of President Obama to act on the Syria conflict before it is the right time,” writes Michael Izady, a professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University. “The worst scenario is to bring more chaos by toppling the Assad regime while having no viable and desirable alternative to him in the opposition to guard the interests of all Syrians of all religious and ethnic persuasions.”

Read his op-ed on The Hill’s Congress Blog.

BabyCenter blog: “Shouting at kids, especially teens, gets the wrong results”

“When parents yell and scream at their children, or at others with whom they interact, their child gets the message that this is appropriate behavior,” Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, professor of psychology at Pace University. “In turn these children may interact similarly with their peers, parents, teachers, and coaches.”

. . . Lots of psychologists are weighing in on this topic, as did Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, professor of psychology at Pace University and co-author of “Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.”

Children learn by watching their parents, Powell-Lunder reminds us:

“When parents yell and scream at their children, or at others with whom they interact, their child gets the message that this is appropriate behavior. In turn these children may interact similarly with their peers, parents, teachers, and coaches.”

A better alternative, in an ideal world, is to stay supportive and calm:

“The best approach to encouraging positive behaviors in children and teens is twofold. First, parents need to practice what they preach. Secondly, parents need to create a structured and supportive environment for their kids. Such an environment includes clear rules, consequences and of course reinforcement through praise and continued encouragement.”

Read more on the BabyCenter blog

DirectionsMag.com: “Pace University GIS Basics MOOC Launches Sept 9”

Peggy Minnis, who introduced the idea of a “GIS 101” sort of course to readers back in April, is currently welcoming students to the real McCoy. Her “GIS Basics” massive open online course (MOOC) begins September 9 and runs for 12 weeks. The course focuses on key GIS skills using ArcGIS for Desktop.

Peggy Minnis, who introduced the idea of a “GIS 101” sort of course to readers back in April, is currently welcoming students to the real McCoy. Her “GIS Basics” massive open online course (MOOC) begins September 9 and runs for 12 weeks. The course focuses on key GIS skills using ArcGIS for Desktop.

Read the article on DirectionsMag.com.

 

Epoch Times: “US Rethinking Aid, Weapons Exports Amid Egypt Violence”

. . . Michael Izady, professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University, believes that when it comes to Egypt’s military, the United States still has leverage. [left: Egyptian troops keep watch at a checkpoint during the curfew hours in Cairo late on Aug. 19. (KHALED DESOUKI/AFP/Getty Images)

. . . Michael Izady, professor of Middle Eastern and Western history at Pace University, believes that when it comes to Egypt’s military, the United States still has leverage.

“We have a fair amount of influence on the Egyptian military, but also the secular, progressive strata of the Egyptian society,” he said.

Read the story by Epoch Times.

NPR Talk of the Nation: “Breaking Bad News To Kids: How Media Has Tweaked The Process”

Parents have always had to break hard news to kids, from family hardships to national tragedies. Now there are more ways for children to learn about news faster — through 24 hour news and social media. So, what’s changed in how parents broach these subjects? How can media help, or hurt? Listen to an interview with Jennifer Powell-Lunder, clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Pace University.

Parents have always had to break hard news to kids, from family hardships to national tragedies. Now there are more ways for children to learn about news faster — through 24 hour news and social media. So, what’s changed in how parents broach these subjects? How can media help, or hurt? Listen to an interview with Jennifer Powell-Lunder, clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Pace University.

Huffington Post: “Sea Turtle Documentary Produced By Pace University Students Highlights Conservation (VIDEO)”

. . . Produced by students from Pace University, the 16-minute film takes a close look at the coalition Grupo Tortuguero, which has been working to protect endangered sea turtles in Mexico’s Magdalena Bay on the Baja Peninsula by developing new, sustainable ways to support the region’s economy.

In the epic and eternal battle between sea turtles and fishermen, can both survive? The answer can be yes, according to the new documentary, “¡Viva la Tortuga!” Produced by students from Pace University, the 16-minute film takes a close look at the coalition Grupo Tortuguero, which has been working to protect endangered sea turtles in Mexico’s Magdalena Bay on the Baja Peninsula by developing new, sustainable ways to support the region’s economy.

See the video on Huffington Post.

PIX11 News: “Climate change concern: Will longer heat waves lead to bigger crime waves?”

. . . “What weather does is it brings people outside,” said Joe Ryan, PhD, chair of the criminal justice department at Pace University. “And [it brings] the interaction of people.” Ryan said, in a PIX11 interview, that just because more people are outside interacting in the heat doesn’t necessarily mean that’s the cause of the rise in violent crime.

. . . “What weather does is it brings people outside,” said Joe Ryan, PhD, chair of the criminal justice department at Pace University.  “And [it brings] the interaction of people.”

Ryan said, in a PIX11 interview, that just because more people are outside interacting in the heat doesn’t necessarily mean that’s the cause of the rise in violent crime.

USA Today: “Boston bombing suspect has his defenders, many of them female”

. . . Combined with YouTube postings, pictures of him goofing around with friends, his own Twitter feed and media interviews with classmates who describe “the kind of kid they knew him to be,” he doesn’t fit the part of some “nefarious” person you need to fear, says Pace professor Jennifer Powell-Lunder, co-author of Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.

. . . In some ways, “there’s a romanticism about him that is being connected to,” says Jennifer Powell-Lunder, a clinical psychologist and adjunct professor at Pace University in New York. Supporters are drawn to “the boy next door… the smart, attractive young college student.”

Combined with YouTube postings, pictures of him goofing around with friends, his own Twitter feed and media interviews with classmates who describe “the kind of kid they knew him to be,” he doesn’t fit the part of some “nefarious” person you need to fear, says Powell-Lunder, co-author of Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.

Read the story in USA Today.

Monster: “How Economic Growth Could Impact Staffing in 2013”

. . . “The economy was depressed for a long time, so the potential is there for hiring,” says Farrokh Hormozi, an economist and chair of the Public Administration Department at Pace University in New York City.

. . . “The economy was depressed for a long time, so the potential is there for hiring,” says Farrokh Hormozi, an economist and chair of the Public Administration Department at Pace University in New York City.

Read the article on Monster.