NEWS RELEASE: Political Science Professor Matthew Bolton Presented Statement on Disarmament to UN General Assembly

Political science professor, Matthew Bolton, PhD, addressed the United Nations General Assembly First Committee, on behalf of international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working on disarmament, peace building and humanitarian issues.

On behalf of global civil society organizations, political science professor calls for disarmament and arms control “driven by the needs and rights of people most affected by armed violence.”

New York – A Pace University New York City political science professor, Matthew Bolton, PhD, addressed the United Nations General Assembly First Committee, on behalf of international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working on disarmament, peace building and humanitarian issues.

“We call for an approach to disarmament that is driven by the needs and rights of people most affected by armed violence, not by the discretion of states and organizations most responsible for it,” said Bolton to representatives of the 193 UN member states, as well as UN agencies and NGOs. The First Committee has responsibility for disarmament and international security.

The NGO statement, endorsed by 11 organizations, congratulated states on “some noteworthy progress” in recent international discussions on the elimination of nuclear weapons, the recent Security Council resolution on small arms and light weapons as well as the Arms Trade Treaty, signed by over 100 states since June.

Members of the Pace University community played an important role in the Arms Trade Treaty negotiations in July 2012 and March 2013. Bolton was an advisor to Control Arms, the civil society coalition advocating for a “bulletproof treaty” and numerous students interned or worked with the campaign.

Despite these developments in global policy-making on controlling weapons, however, Bolton asserted that “now is not the time for resting on laurels.” The NGO statement identified numerous concerns, including the abuse of the consensus rule in disarmament forums, exclusion of meaningful civil society participation, lack of equal opportunities for women in decision-making and the marginalization of the voices of victims and survivors of armed violence.

“Creativity and new human-centered approaches must be a requirement for all states advocating nuclear disarmament, conventional arms control and reduced military expenditure,” said Bolton, reading the NGO statement. “We can and must replace stalemate and watered-down outcomes with alternatives that advance human security and social and economic justice.”

In addition to teaching classes on international politics, Bolton also leads Pace University’s New York Model United Nations program. Last weekend – 25-27 October – 25 Pace students participated in the National Model United Nations conference in Washington DC, representing Argentina, Denmark and Kenya in simulations of the First Committee and other UN decision-making bodies.

Pace was recognized by the conference with four awards, for students’ excellent diplomatic skills, public speaking abilities and political savvy. Given their success, Bolton asked his students for their advice on how to deliver his statement at the actual United Nations. “They were happy to oblige,” said Bolton.

Bolton is an expert on global disarmament policy. He is author of Foreign Aid and Landmine Clearance: Governance, Politics and Security in Afghanistan, Bosnia and Sudan (I.B. Tauris, 2010) and a forthcoming travelogue Political Minefields (I.B. Tauris, 2014). He has written widely on the politics of landmines, cluster munitions, the Arms Trade Treaty and fully autonomous military robotics (“killer robots”). His recent lecture on the politics of landmines and military robotics is available on the Pace University’s iTunes U account.

Located only two express subway stops from the iconic United Nations complex on the East River, Pace University’s scholars actively engage with global policymaking debates. This June, Pace hosted an expert symposium on Robotic Weapons Control, and the university has partnered with the UN Commission on the Status of Women to create workshops on global policies that affect women and girls.

Pace University has a 60-year history of excellence in regional, national and international Model United Nations conferences and encourages its students to develop the skills and capacities needed to thrive as global citizens. Drawing students from around the world, Pace has numerous academic programs related to international affairs, including political science, peace and justice studies, global Asia studies, international management, Latin American studies, modern languages and cultures, women’s and gender studies and environmental studies.

Contact:

Matthew Bolton, PhD
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Dyson College of Arts and Sciences
Pace University
1 Pace Plaza
New York, NY 10038

+1 (212) 346 1828

mbolton@pace.edu
http://politicalminefields.com
@politicalmines

Journal News (video): “Mean Girl Cattiness: She Was Born With It?”

. . . The findings of the study—that women use relationships to navigate life and get ahead—is nothing new, said Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

. . . “Indirect aggression”—otherwise known as gossiping, backstabbing and shunning—is a technique women have perfected through the ages, and have employed as an effective competition strategy, claims Tracy Vaillancourt, a professor of psychology at the University of Ottawa, in a report published in the Canadian journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B last month.

“Females prefer to use indirect aggression over direct aggression (i.e. verbal and physical aggression) because this … maximizes the harm inflicted on the victim while minimizing the personal danger involved,” according to the report. “The risk to the perpetrator is lower because he/she often remains anonymous.”

The findings of the study—that women use relationships to navigate life and get ahead—is nothing new, said Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

“Whenever studies like this come out, we tend to make generalizations, and yes, women use relationships to get ahead,” said Powell-Lunder, a co-author of the book, “Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual. “The survival of the fittest for men is based on physical prowess. Even in the businesses world, men who show they are fierce and strong with their voice and body language are revered. For women, it’s more about learning to negotiate systems through relationships to get where they need to go. And unfortunately, that has its negatives.”

Watch the video on Journal News blog The Hall Monitor.

 

Broadway World: Tony Winner John Doyle Named Pace Performing Arts’ Musical Theater Artist-in-Residence

Broadway World published an article on Pace Musical Theater artist-in-residence John Doyle.

Broadway World published an article on Pace Musical Theater artist-in-residence John Doyle.

From Broadway World:

Scottish director John Doyle is Pace Performing Arts Musical Theater Program’s second artist-in-residence. The unique Artist in Residence program within the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences is made possible through an anonymous endowed gift.

Doyle, whose inventive re-staging of Sweeney Todd earned him a Tony Award, will work with faculty members at Pace Performing Arts Musical Theater program throughout this academic year to teach a variety of master classes and critique student projects, including vocal performance, song interpretation, the process of composition and the creative process. Doyle will give a public lecture in spring 2014, in which he will explore the creative process of directing musical theater.

To read the full article, click here.

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Journal News: Westchester exec race: Astorino, Bramson tangle for last time (video)

. . . “What’s important is not just cutting taxes and cutting programs but having a plan to better the county,” said Sam Fandrich, a graduate student at Pace University and a panelist for the debate hosted by the League of Women Voters of Westchester and Pace.

. . . “What’s important is not just cutting taxes and cutting programs but having a plan to better the county,” said Sam Fandrich, a graduate student at Pace University and a panelist for the debate hosted by the League of Women Voters of Westchester and Pace.

Watch the video of the debate on LoHud.com

 

Huffington Post: “Janetta Rebold Benton: Medieval Scholar, Modern Wit”

Dr. Janetta Rebold Benton, Distinguished Professor of Art History at Pace University is currently giving a series of lectures titled ART HISTORY ALIVE: France’s Fascinating Art at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in lower Manhattan.

Dr. Janetta Rebold Benton, Distinguished Professor of Art History at Pace University is currently giving a series of lectures titled ART HISTORY ALIVE: France’s Fascinating Art at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in lower Manhattan.

Read the interview on Huffington Post.

China Daily USA: “A day of Chinese cultural exchange at Pace University”

China’s Nanjing Normal University joined the Confucius Institute at Pace University in Manhattan to host a day of cultural exchange that celebrated the partnership and friendship between the two institutions. (left: the campus of Nanjing Normal University)

China’s Nanjing Normal University joined the Confucius Institute at Pace University in Manhattan to host a day of cultural exchange that celebrated the partnership and friendship between the two institutions.

Read the article in China Daily USA.

 

Playbill: “Pasek and Paul’s Dogfight Enters the Ring With College Students at Pace University”

The 2013 Lucille Lortel Award-winning musical Dogfight — an unlikely love story between a clumsy waitress and a Vietnam-bound soldier that features a pop-rock score by rising theatrical songwriters and Tony Award nominees Benj Pasek and Justin Paul — will be given its first staging, following its Off-Broadway premiere, Oct. 2-9 at New York City’s Pace University.

The 2013 Lucille Lortel Award-winning musical Dogfight — an unlikely love story between a clumsy waitress and a Vietnam-bound soldier that features a pop-rock score by rising theatrical songwriters and Tony Award nominees Benj Pasek and Justin Paul — will be given its first staging, following its Off-Broadway premiere, Oct. 2-9 at New York City’s Pace University.

Read about it in Playbill.

TheStreet.com (video): “Congress Is ‘Responsible Enough'”

With a looming government shutdown, Pace University’s Farrokh Hormozi tells TheStreet’s Joe Deaux that Congress will reach an agreement.

With a looming government shutdown, Pace University’s Farrokh Hormozi tells TheStreet’s Joe Deaux that Congress will reach an agreement.

Watch the video.

Washington Times: “Aaron Alexis’ history renews debate between mental issues, gun crimes”

. . . “He did go to a very dangerous facility, a place that would be quite dangerous for him. He’s going to a place where he most likely will be jeopardizing his own life,” said Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an associate professor of psychology at Pace. “This was not a movie theater where you can get in and get out. This is a highly guarded facility. There most likely was some self-destructive intent here.”

. . . “He did go to a very dangerous facility, a place that would be quite dangerous for him. He’s going to a place where he most likely will be jeopardizing his own life,” said Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center and an associate professor of psychology at Pace University in New York City. “This was not a movie theater where you can get in and get out. This is a highly guarded facility. There most likely was some self-destructive intent here.”

Read the article in the Washington Times.

The Daily Pleasantville: Pace Introduces First Mental Health Counseling Doctoral Degree In N.Y.

Pace University’s Pleasantville campus has introduced the first doctoral degree in mental health counseling in New York State, in the just-begun fall term. (Left: Pace Professor Ross Robak, Ph.D., and students in the university’s new mental health counseling Ph.D. program.)

Pace University’s Pleasantville campus has introduced the first doctoral degree in mental health counseling in New York State, in the just-begun fall term.

As part of the psychology department of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, the program is designed to provide master’s-level students with advanced professional and scholarly training.

“Doctoral-level mental health counselors bring a depth and breadth of understanding to their work with clients as practitioners, as well as to the research of new therapeutic modalities,” says Rostyslaw Robak, department chair and professor of psychology on the Pleasantville campus. “The program will enrich our graduates’ ability to work successfully with clients and to develop new ways to treat mental health conditions that have the potential to significantly advance the field of mental health counseling.”

The doctoral program is open to applicants with a master’s degree in mental-health counseling or a closely related field. The program offers teaching, research and administrative assistantships with partial tuition remission.

To learn more about the program, call 914-422-4283, email gradwp@pace.edu, or visit www.pace.edu/phdmhc.

Read the full original article here.