NEWS RELEASE: Pace University Teams Up with HooplaHa.com

The Pace Master’s program in Media, Communications and Visual Arts incorporated HooplaHa, a startup website dedicated to spreading positivity, in their semester’s course load. (Left: Yulia Moore).

Posted on behalf of HooplaHa:

Pace University Teams Up with HooplaHa.com to

Spread Positivity and Creativity

Pleasantville, NY (January 4, 2013) – Pace University, a NY-based private university, and HooplaHa.com have joined forces to put happiness and creativity into action. The Pace Master’s program in Media, Communications and Visual Arts incorporated HooplaHa, a startup website dedicated to spreading positivity, in their semester’s course load.

Dr. Maria T. Luskay, professor of the Digital Video Field Production course in the Master’s program, advocates for real-world experiences inside the classroom. Based on experiential education and a hands-on approach, students act as a production team to complete a final project.  In this particular case, the final project was to create a positive and inspirational video for HooplaHa.com.

Managing Director of HooplaHa™, Rob Hess believes the partnership is the perfect match. “We need content. Why not give these students the opportunity to have their work published and featured on our site? It’s such a thrill for them and exactly in line with our mission,” said Hess.

The HooplaHa Content Team attended the class in the start of the semester to tell students about the mission of HooplaHa.com and what was needed for the final project. In groups of 3-4, students created a final video product and the HooplaHa Content Team chose a winner to be featured on the site.

“We judged the videos based on production value, storytelling, and their ability to deliver a product that fits our goals,” said Stephanie Bousquet, Director of Content. Amare Kone, Olivia Hunter and Yulia Moore were the final winners with their video, Aunt B’s Secret to Happiness. The winning group was inspired to create this video about Aunt B because they felt her contagious spirit and zest for life is a perfect match for HooplaHa.com.

Olivia Hunter
Amara Kone

About HooplaHa

HooplaHa.com, an innovative website, is positively impacting people around the world by sharing content guaranteed to make you Think, Relate & Smile! HooplaHais owned by Only Good News, LLC, a Fairfield County, Connecticut based company. For more information on how you too can change the world one inspiration at a time, visit us at www.HooplaHa.com.

Media Contact: Erin McNichols, emcnichols@hooplaha.com, 203-956-7366

BBC: Star Wars

BBC’s Jamillah interviewed Pace professor and author Nancy Reagin about her book on the historical influences that helped to shape the Star Wars movies.

BBC’s Jamillah interviewed Pace professor and author Nancy Reagin about her book on the historical influences that helped to shape the Star Wars movies.

Listen to the interview here.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/pods

New York Times, Daily News, Boston Globe, Broadway World and more: Pace University Presents HAMLET

Following a widely acclaimed tour and run at the Globe in 2011, Shakespeare’s Globe returned to the Schimmel theater at Pace, the company’s New York home, with a production of Hamlet. Performances were also added this year at Pace’s Pleasantville campus.

From The New York Times:

The corpses strewn copiously across the stage all rise and perform a merry jig at the conclusion of the touring production of “Hamlet” from Shakespeare’s Globe theater, which opened on Tuesday night for a brief run (through Sunday) at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts. This dance of the dead is not some dubious high-concept coda from a director bent on textual depravities. It’s the traditional conclusion of many productions from this estimable London theater and harks back to Elizabethan practices.

Cutting a rug may seem out of place as a conclusion to a death-haunted tragedy like “Hamlet,” but the jubilant finale doesn’t jar even a little in this version, staged by the Globe artistic director, Dominic Dromgoole, and Bill Buckhurst. It feels entirely in tune with a production that prizes efficiency, clarity, accessibility and above all energy.

The house lights remain on throughout the comparatively brisk running time of 2 hours 40 minutes: a nod to the open-air atmosphere of the Globe theater, we are told as the play begins. Once again it seems apt. With Michael Benz portraying the title character as a restless youth whose “antic disposition” is less a pose than a natural way of being, this is a “Hamlet” in which shadows have been more or less banished to the sidelines.

Staged on a simple wooden set, based on the traditional Elizabethan model, the production features a compact company of just eight actors. All but Mr. Benz play more than one role. This might be expected to sow confusion, but the actors are skilled at shifting gears, and the textual nips and tucks are so deftly handled that even scenes that pose obvious challenges come across cleanly.

The handsome, blond Mr. Benz looks as if he should be palling around with the roistering Prince Harry — the current one, I mean — getting into some harmless mischief. His performance brims with high spirits that tend to make you forget that Hamlet’s mission is murder. Dispatching Polonius in the emotionally fraught encounter with his mother, Gertrude (Miranda Foster), Mr. Benz’s Hamlet seems delighted with himself, if a little petulantly disappointed that the fox has dashed away once again. Hamlet’s tortured inability to act, as interpreted by Mr. Benz, seems less a matter of moral and philosophical doubt than a decision to keep the fun and games going for as long as he can.

At 30, Mr. Benz is one of the youngest actors I’ve seen in the role, and the air of callow insouciance he brings to it occasionally had me wincing. But he speaks the verse with an easy authority that makes every phrase tell, even when he, like many of the actors, is plowing through the text at a dizzying clip. In the great soliloquies his Hamlet seems less to be wrestling with his soul than expressing casual confidences to the audience.

The brash boyishness lends the character a certain pathos: it seems cruelly unfair that this gilded youth should be required to sully his spirits with the unpleasant task of avenging his father’s death. But the emphasis on Hamlet’s irreverence comes at the expense of cultivating a character with a believable interior life, resulting in the occasional inconsistency.

It’s hard to give much credence to this Hamlet when he is confessing to Rosencrantz (Peter Bray) and Guildenstern (Matthew Romain) that he has “lost all his mirth.” The gloomy soliloquy that follows, in which Hamlet calls the world a “foul and pestilent congregation of vapors,” seems more a youthful pose than an agonized cry.

The supporting roles are handled with less outward flair but similar efficiency. Christopher Saul shines as a busily blustering Polonius and in particular a mordantly funny gravedigger. Ms. Foster’s Gertrude is somewhat hampered by the textual trims, to the point that her brief performance as the second gravedigger, in which she sports a woolly Cockney accent, is almost as memorable. Dickon Tyrrell is a stern ghost in the opening scenes and a chronically exasperated Claudius.

The Ophelia of Carlyss Peer is well matched with Mr. Benz’s Hamlet in at least one respect: She seems a young woman of stout good cheer and a strong backbone. Unfortunately this makes her sudden collapse into madness and frailty less credible than it might be. I could more easily picture her doing a brisk backstroke to the river’s edge rather than allowing the waters to claim her, as poor mad Ophelia does.

The surging waves of feeling that can overtake you at a more soul-stirring production of “Hamlet” mostly fail to emerge, but the Globe players are certainly adepts at finding brief sunbursts of laughter in the text, and sometimes outside it. Claudius amusingly garbles the names of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, more than once, and there’s a funny interpolated reference to the “student union lounge bar.” Mr. Benz’s exuberant physicality raises smiles too, as he scampers around the stage with Rosencrantz and Guildenstern as if playing a game of tag.

Mr. Dromgoole and Mr. Buckhurst’s production seems conceived to reach as wide an audience as possible, in particular winning over those spoilsports who find Shakespeare a dreary slog. If this means forgoing some of the play’s psychological complexity and philosophical heft, so be it. You may not be overcome by grief when Mr. Benz’s Hamlet breathes his last, but you may feel a pang at the loss of a lad who was such boisterous good company.

Hamlet

By William Shakespeare; directed by Dominic Dromgoole and Bill Buckhurst; sets and costumes by Jonathan Fensom; score by Laura Forrest-Hay, music and arrangements by Bill Barclay; lighting by Paul Russell; choreography by Sian Williams; fight director, Kevin McCurdy; text by Giles Block; movement by Glynn MacDonald; voice and dialect by Martin McKellan; assistant director, Alison Convey; assistant choreographer, Chloe Stephens; production managers, Mr. Russell and Dave McEvoy; technical manager, Wills; company manager, Marion Marrs; general manager U.S.A., 2Luck Concepts/Eleanor Oldham and John Luckacovic; general manager Britain, Shakespeare’s Globe Theater/Claire Godden; executive producer, Sacha Milroy. Presented by Pace University and Shakespeare’s Globe Theater, Mr. Dromgoole, artistic director. At the Schimmel Center for the Arts, Pace University, 3 Spruce Street, near Park Row, Lower Manhattan, (212) 346-1715, schimmel.pace.edu. Through Oct. 7. Running time: 2 hours 40 minutes.

WITH: Michael Benz (Hamlet), Peter Bray (Rosencrantz/Marcellus/Prince Fortinbras/Osric), Miranda Foster (Gertrude/Second Player/Player Queen/Second Gravedigger), Tom Lawrence (Horatio/Reynaldo/Captain), Carlyss Peer (Ophelia/Voltemand), Matthew Romain (Laertes/Bernardo/Guildenstern/Lucianus), Christopher Saul (Polonius/Francisco/Player/First Gravedigger/Priest) and Dickon Tyrrell (Claudius/Ghost/First Player/Player King).

A version of this review appeared in print on October 4, 2012, on page C3 of the New York edition with the headline: Yes, a Blended Family Can Be a Pain, But That Danish Prince Tries His Best.

From Broadway World:

Following a widely acclaimed tour and run at the Globe in 2011, Shakespeare’s Globe returns to the Schimmel Center, the company’s New York home, elemental production of Hamlet. Using an Elizabethan-inspired stage in this scaled-down production, a handful of energetic players will perform this inexhaustible play.

This production began its American tour in Washington DC where Peter Marks of The Washington Post exclaimed “it’s a ripping good yarn” and that directors “Dromgoole and Buckhurst locate freshness on this rough turf.” Marks goes on to say that “this production shows that under the right circumstances that Hamlet can indeed be cut down.”

Shakespeare’s Globe’s production of Hamlet began its tour of the United States in September in Washington DC. Performed on an Elizabethan booth stage – influenced by paintings and etchings from Shakespeare’s time and designed by Tony Award nominee Jonathan Fensom (Journey’s End, Broadway) – this travelling production follows the pattern of the Globe’s tours from 400 years ago. After a long tour around many of the UK and Europe’s most charismatic settings, including the Globe itself, the Bodleian Library and Elsinore, Hamlet opened in Washington DC, before heading to New York, Boston and a West Coast tour.

Using a new text created from the Folio of 1623 and the touring Quarto of 1603, Artistic Director Dominic Dromgoole, and Globe regular Bill Buckhurst co-direct a bold and fresh production.

Taking on the title role is Michael Benz. Michael was brought up in the UK and studied at Georgetown University in Washington DC, before going to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in London. Michael’s theatre credits include Trevor Nunn’s productions of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead and Ferdinand in The Tempest with Ralph Fiennes.

Music has been composed by Bill Barclay, who has previously composed music for Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, MA and Actors’ Shakespeare Project in Boston, MA. He has held artist residencies for directing, composing, or conducting at Columbia University, the University of Connecticut, Purdue University, Brandeis University, the University of Wisconsin and the University of Virginia, has taught acting at Emerson College and Boston University and been a guest lecturer at Harvard University.

To find out all touring locations and booking information visit shakespearesglobe.com.

Read about Shakespeare’s Globe’s Hamlet performances at Pace’s Pleasantville campus in The Journal News here, here, and here.

The performances were also listed in the New Yorker and reviewed in the New York Daily News, The New York Times, TheaterMania, and the Boston Globe.

Broadway World: Ryan Scott Oliver and The Musical Theater Program at Pace University Now Accepting PACE NEW MUSICALS Submissions

Ryan Scott Oliver and The Musical Theater Program at Pace University are currently accepting submissions of new musical theater works for a series of performances at Pace University in January 2013.

Broadway World ran a story on the Pace New Musicals series coming in January.

From Broadway World:

Ryan Scott Oliver and The Musical Theater Program at Pace University are currently accepting submissions of new musical theater works for a series of performances at Pace University in January 2013.

Previous work in the series includes Darling (by Ryan Scott Oliver); College the Musical (by Scott Elmegreen and Drew Fornarola), 2008 New York Musical Theatre Festival Awards: Excellence in Writing (Lyrics) – WINNER); Quanah (by Tony Dodge and Larry Gatlin); Factory Girls (by Creighton Irons, Sean Mahoney and Maggie-Kate Coleman); and A Lasting Impression (recently seen at NYTW).

The chosen piece will be given a full reading in the Schaeberle Theater at Pace University in lower Manhattan, with actors chosen from the musical theater student body. There will be a two week rehearsal period starting Tuesday, January 8, 2013 with 8 performances starting January 22 and ending January 27, 2013.

Because of the short rehearsal time, we are looking for completed scores and scripts. Pace New Musicals will provide the space, the performers, a stage manager, a light board and light operator, and a director and music director. If there is already a director and/or music director attached to the project and wants to continue that association, then it is up to the creators whether or not to use them for this reading.

Our objective is to nurture the creation of new musical theater in New York City and to provide an invaluable educational opportunity to our students to work directly with top professionals in the field.

The Musical Theater Program at Pace University started in 2002 with six majors and has grown to a fully accredited BFA program in Music Theater with one hundred majors. Under the guidance of its founder, Amy Rogers and music director, Robert Meffe, the program is preparing the next generation of Broadway performers.

PLEASE SUBMIT THE FOLLOWING (If you would like your submissions returned, please include a self-addressed stamped envelope with your application):

• CD or mp3 files of three songs with sheet music (lead sheets are acceptable)
• A brief description of each song as to its plot placement
• A brief synopsis of the musical including time period and number of scene locations
• A character breakdown including age, sex, approximate vocal part and a short description of each character.
• Biographical information for each composer, lyricist & book writer. (Please include address/phone number/email)

SEND YOUR PACKAGE TO:
Robert Meffe
Pace New Musicals
c/o Pace University Department of Performing Arts
41 Park Row, 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10038

If submitting electronically, please send files in Adobe pdf format, Microsoft Word format, Finale files up to Finale 2011 or Sibelius files up to Sibelius 7, to pacenewmusicals@gmail.com.

Please submit 3 songs only. If you send us a full recording, we will only listen to the first 3 songs. Submissions do not need to be produced in a studio. We are looking for talent and potential, not how well something is produced. You will be notified by November 9, 2012 if you have been selected to present your musical.  Please include copyright clearances if they are necessary. Works cannot be considered without these.  If the piece is currently under option, please submit a letter from the option holder giving permission for entry.

DEADLINE: October 20, 2012

Broadwayworld.com, Playbill and more: Composer Adam Guettel to Become the First Artist-in-Residence at Pace University’s Musical Theater Program

Playbill, Broadwayworld, Daily Me and TheaterMania have reported on the new artist in residence program in performing arts at Pace with Tony-award winner Adam Guettel as first artist in residence in the musical theater program.

Playbill, Broadwayworld, Daily Me and TheaterMania have reported on the new artist in residence program in performing arts at Pace with Tony-award winner Adam Guettel as first artist in residence in the musical theater program.

From Broadwayworld.com:

Pace University performing arts students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will gain exposure this year to high-profile industry stars on campus through new artist-in-residence programs in musical theater and commercial dance.

These programs bring distinguished professional guest artists to campus annually to share expertise from the field. Beginning this fall, Pace students will learn first-hand the process of creating, producing and performing new musical theater material with Tony award-winning composer and lyricist Adam Guettel, the first of a series of artists-in-residence in Pace’s musical theater program, made possible through an anonymous endowed gift.
Guettel will work with faculty members at Pace to teach a variety of master classes and critique student projects. Subjects covered will include vocal performance, song interpretation, the process of composition and the creative process. Guettel will also workshop new musical material at Pace.

Guettel will give a public lecture in spring 2013, in which he will explore the creative process by which he composes music and writes lyrics for the theater that will include demonstrations from his work performed by current and recent graduates from the Pace BFA in Musical Theater program.

This semester the commercial dance program kicked-off an artist-in-residence program made possible by a generous gift from Voice of an Angel. Pace students learned trade secrets from choreographer and dancer Brian Friedman during two days of intensive workshops. Upcoming dance artists-in-residence this semester at Pace include New York City Ballet star Tiler Peck, musical writer and performer Gregg Russell, and dancer and “Spider-Man, Turn Off the Dark” and “Cirque du Soleil” choreographer Cherice Barton.

“Through the generosity of our donors we are able to take full advantage of the richness of our New York City location and bring world-renowned talent to our campus several times over the course of the academic year, giving our students unique opportunities,” said Nira Herrmann, Dyson College dean. “This program truly illustrates how Dyson and Pace make use of New York as an extension of our campus, not only by having students go out into the city, but also by bringing its fabulous resources onto our campus.”

About Adam Guettel: Adam Guettel is an American composer-lyricist of musical theater and opera. He is best known for the musical “The Light in the Piazza,” for which he won two Tony Awards for Best Score and Best Orchestrations, and two Drama Desk Awards for Best Music and Best Orchestrations. His early works include 1996’s “Floyd Collins,” “Love’s Fire,” and “Saturn Returns.” Guettel’s songs have been recorded by such artists as Audra McDonald and Brian d’Arcy James. He also contributed original scores to several documentary films, including “Arguing the World and Jack: The Last Kennedy Film.” In 1999, he performed a concert evening of his own work at New York’s Town Hall. In 2004, Guettel contributed vocals to Broadway star and cabaret singer Jessica Molaskey‘s P.S. Classics album “Make Believe.” In July 2009, the Signature Theatre of Arlington, Virginia commissioned Guettel to write a new musical for their 2011-2012 season under the auspices of their American Musical Voices Project.

Read full article here:

Composer Adam Guettel to Become the First Artist-in-Residence at Pace Universitys Musical Theater Program.

NEWS RELEASE: New Artist in Residence Programs Offer Pace University Students Exposure to Industry Stars

Pace University performing arts students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will gain exposure this year to high-profile industry stars on campus through new artist-in-residence programs in musical theater and commercial dance.

NEW ARTIST IN RESIDENCE PROGRAMS OFFER PACE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS EXPOSURE TO INDUSTRY STARS

Tony Award-Winner, Composer Adam Guettel, To Be First Artist-in-Residence at Pace University’s Musical Theater Program

NEW YORK, NY, October 3, 2012 –Pace University performing arts students in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will gain exposure this year to high-profile industry stars on campus through new artist-in-residence programs in musical theater and commercial dance.

These programs bring distinguished professional guest artists to campus annually to share expertise from the field. Beginning this fall, Pace students  will learn first-hand the process of creating, producing and performing new musical theater material with Tony award-winning composer and lyricist Adam Guettel,  the first of a series of artists-in-residence in Pace’s musical theater program, made possible through an anonymous endowed gift.

Guettel will work with faculty members at Pace to teach a variety of master classes and critique student projects. Subjects covered will include vocal performance, song interpretation, the process of composition and the creative process. Guettel will also workshop new musical material at Pace.

Guettel will give a public lecture in spring 2013, in which he will explore the creative process by which he composes music and writes lyrics for the theater that will include demonstrations from his work performed by current and recent graduates from the Pace BFA in Musical Theater program. 

This semester the commercial dance program kicked-off an artist-in-residence program made possible by a generous gift from Voice of an Angel. Pace students learned trade secrets from choreographer and dancer Brian Friedman during two days of intensive workshops. Upcoming dance artists-in-residence this semester at Pace include New York City Ballet star Tiler Peck, musical writer and performer Gregg Russell, and dancer and “Spider-Man, Turn Off the Dark” and “Cirque du Soleil” choreographer Cherice Barton.

“Through the generosity of our donors we are able to take full advantage of the richness of our New York City location and bring world-renowned talent to our campus several times over the course of the academic year, giving our students unique opportunities,” said Nira Herrmann, Dyson College dean. “This program truly illustrates how Dyson and Pace make use of New York as an extension of our campus, not only by having students go out into the city, but also by bringing its fabulous resources onto our campus.”

About Adam Guettel: Adam Guettel is an American composer-lyricist of musical theater and opera. He is best known for the musical “The Light in the Piazza,” for which he won two Tony Awards for Best Score and Best Orchestrations, and two Drama Desk Awards for Best Music and Best Orchestrations. His early works include 1996’s “Floyd Collins,” “Love’s Fire,” and “Saturn Returns.” Guettel’s songs have been recorded by such artists as Audra McDonald and Brian d’Arcy James. He also contributed original scores to several documentary films, including “Arguing the World and Jack: The Last Kennedy Film.” In 1999, he performed a concert evening of his own work at New York’s Town Hall. In 2004, Guettel contributed vocals to Broadway star and cabaret singer Jessica Molaskey’s P.S. Classics album “Make Believe.” In July 2009, the Signature Theatre of Arlington, Virginia commissioned Guettel to write a new musical for their 2011-2012 season under the auspices of their American Musical Voices Project.

About Performing Arts at Pace University: Pace University’s Performing Arts Department offers Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees in Acting, Musical Theater and Commercial Dance, a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theater Arts with specialized focuses in Acting, Commercial Dance, Directing or Design/Technical Theater. For more information, visit www.pace.edu/dyson/performingarts.

Dyson College is also home to The Actors Studio Drama School with the only MFA theater program officially sanctioned by The Actors Studio. The curriculum is designed jointly by the presidents of The Actors Studio, Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino. Students participate in craft seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series, “Inside The Actors Studio,” hosted by James Lipton. For further information about the program, go to www.pace.edu/actorsstudiomfa

About Pace University: For over 100 years, Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680.

USA Today, Yahoo! News, Downtown Express, Westchester County Business Journal and more: Lubin Launches New Arts and Entertainment Management Program

Lubin’s new Arts and Entertainment Management program is creating a buzz in media outlets including Yahoo! News, USA Today, Westchester County Business Journal, Businessweek, Broadway World and more. (Left: Neil Braun, dean of the Lubin School of Business at Pace University).

Lubin’s new Arts and Entertainment Management program is creating a buzz in media outlets including Yahoo! News, USA Today, Westchester County Business Journal, Businessweek, Broadway World and more.

From the Westchester County Business Journal:

Since former television executive Neil Braun became dean of Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in July 2010, the university’s fastest-growing department hasn’t been communications or finance or accounting.

It has been the performing arts – a feat that hardly escaped Braun, who served as president of the NBC Television Network and CEO of Viacom Entertainment prior to his arrival at Pace.

In an effort to tap into the growing interest in the arts and the wealth of resources in the New York City area, the Lubin School this fall introduced an Arts and Entertainment Management program to prepare students looking to get involved in the business side of the arts and entertainment fields.

“Most of the calls I get from people in my past are, ‘How do I get my kid into this business?’” Braun said. The key, he said, is showing a demonstrated interest in the industry – and having the degree and the internships to prove it.

“The studios don’t have training programs like the investment banks,” Braun said. “We’re not creating a career path, but think about someone who now shows up to that interview … I think, if I’m a potential employer, that person is going to have an edge.”

Students enrolled in the Lubin School’s management department now have the option of graduating with a concentration in arts and entertainment management, with those students eligible to earn a bachelor of business administration degree.

An arts and entertainment management minor is available to all students.

Both programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

“There are arts and entertainment management programs at other schools, and in New York, but very few have it within the business school,” Braun said. “The difference here is you’re getting an AACSB-accredited business education in the context of learning about an industry you’re really interested in.”

The program will be under the direction of Theresa K. Lant, who has taught in the Lubin School’s management department since 2009 and who serves as co-president of the board of directors of Little Village Playhouse, a nonprofit educational theater program in Pleasantville.

Lant said the program will bring together students from a range of different backgrounds and departments within the university.

“One of the most exciting things about the program is we’re going to have both sets of students – the majors and those getting a minor – in the same classroom,” Lant said. “These are people who work together in the arts and entertainment world – the business people and the creative folks – and we think this is a great way for folks to learn while they’re in school about how to forge these connections, about the skills that each of them brings to the table.”

The Lubin School has already announced a formidable lineup of guest lecturers for students enrolled in the Arts and Entertainment Management program, drawing from television, film and the performing arts.

Included among the speakers are ABC’s Katie Couric, director and Imagine Entertainment founder Ron Howard, Viacom Entertainment Group President Doug Herzog, American Ballet Theatre Executive Director Rachel Moore, New York City Center President and CEO Arlene Shuler and The Shubert Organization co-CEO and President Robert Wankel.

“The initial list of celebrity speakers we have is to both demonstrate the range of what we’re going to be doing … and also to demonstrate that this is the caliber of people we expect to bring to campus,” Braun said.

The academic program will feature courses relating to all aspects of entertainment management, from overseeing the creative process to securing financial support and working with the various stakeholders to the role of technology in the arts and entertainment.

A major focal point for the department will be helping students to secure internships in what is one of the toughest fields to crack into, Lant said.

In the past, Pace has placed students into internships with the likes of NBC, CBS, ABC, HBO, MTV Networks, the Metropolitan Opera, Sony Music, the Roundabout Theater Company, and Sirius XM radio, among others.

Ultimately, Lant and Braun said the school hopes to foster a network of performers, entertainers and business associates within the arts and entertainment fields.

“We’re really interested in building a community of arts and entertainment practitioners,” Lant said. “This will create the network that will carry them into their careers.”

Other outlets covering the new program include Downtown ExpressDaily Markets, Digital Journal, I4U News, LA-Fascination.com, Positive Impact Magazine, TV Balla, 21st Century Scholarships, First Class Travel and more.

The New York Times: Schimmel Center to Host Shakespeare’s Globe’s ‘Hamlet’

Pace’s Schimmel Center will host Shakespeare’s Globe’s “Hamlet” October 2-7.

Jennifer Schuessler, writing for the Arts Beat blog of The New York Times, reported that Pace University’s Schimmel Center will host Shakespeare’s Globe’s “Hamlet” October 2-7.

From New York Times:

“A staging of “Hamlet” by Shakespeare’s Globe theater will be among the attractions in the 2012-13 season at Pace University’s Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, which announced its line-up on Tuesday. “Hamlet,” which is directed by Dominic Dromgoole and will run Oct. 2-7, will be the Shakespeare’s Globe’s third appearance at the center in lower Manhattan, following “Love’s Labour’s Lost” in 2009 and “The Merry Wives of Windsor”in 2010.

The more than 30-event season, which begins on Sept. 22, will also include an appearance by the Romanian gypsy brass band Fanfare Ciocarlia; a banjo summit featuring Béla Fleck; and a tribute to Woody Guthrie by Justin Townes Earle and guests.”

Pleasantville Patch: Pleasantville’s Ties to Underground Railroad [VIDEO]

Pleasantville Patch features an English professor at Pace University’s Dyson School of Arts and Science, Doreethee von Huene Greenberg, PhD, and her research of Pleasantville’s ties to the Underground Railroad.

Pleasantville Patch features an English professor at Pace University’s Dyson School of Arts and Science, Doreethee von Huene Greenberg, PhD, and her research of Pleasantville’s ties to the Underground Railroad.

From Pleasantville Patch:

“More than three years worth of efforts by a dedicated committee were rewarded when the Village of Pleasantville and Town of Mount Pleasant publicly marked the brave actions of two former residents.

Pace University English Professor Dr. Doreethee von Huene Greenberg became interested in the Underground Railroad’s local ties when she connected with Pace alum and local historian Bert Ruiz in 2005 and he told her that “yes,” there was in fact slavery in Pleasantville.

Click the video to the right for more.

He also introduced her to Moses Pierce and Esther Carpenter Pierce, a local Quaker couple who aided escaping slaves during the 1800s.

Greenberg took time off from her post at Pace to research the Pierces, during which time she visited historical sites including the Carpenter Cemetery in New Rochelle, Chappaqua’s Friends Meeting House and the John Jay Homestead.

Her findings were published as an article in The Westchester Historian.

On May 14, local officials and members of the Pierce Committee gathered to dedicate a memorial plaque in front of the Mount Pleasant Public Library to the Pierces. It reads:

Village of Pleasantville—Town of Mount Pleasant

A Stop on the Historic Underground Railroad

Moses Pierce 1816-1886 & Esther Carpenter Pierce 1815-1900

Courageous upholders of just and right principles, the Pierces were local leaders in the abolitionist movement dedicated to ending the cruel institution of slavery. In quiet defiance of the laws of the time, they secretly sheltered enslaved men, women and children at their home, helping them on their perilous road to freedom. Such selfless actions for human rights inspire us still.

Wrote Greenberg, “Focusing on the underground railroad helps us emphasize the best in our culture—courage, generosity, creativity and the willingness to open our hearts to each other in collaboration to create a better, more humane world.”

Read the article and see the video on Patch.com.