NEWS RELEASE: Softball Places 3rd On Division II NFCA All-Academic Ranks

The Pace University Softball team ranked third on the National Fastpitch Coaches Association Division II All-Academic Team for the 2011-12 academic year. The Setters posted a team GPA for 3.527, which was also the top GPA among the Northeast-10 Conference schools. The top school in the country was Grand Canyon University with a 3.600 mark and marked the second year in a row the Setters were ranked among the top academic softball programs in the country.

Pace is #1 Among Northeast-10 Conference Schools

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y.- The Pace University Softball team ranked third on the National Fastpitch Coaches Association Division II All-Academic Team for the 2011-12 academic year. The Setters posted a team GPA for 3.527, which was also the top GPA among the Northeast-10 Conference schools. The top school in the country was Grand Canyon University with a 3.600 mark.

This is the second year in a row that the Setters have been ranked in the top-25 in the nation also the second consecutive season that their team GPA was first among the NE-10 schools. Education major and catcher Lauren Bell (New Windsor, NY/Newburgh Free) posted a 3.93 GPA for the 2011-12 year and finished her collegiate career with a 3.65 cum GPA. Pitcher and first baseman Chelsea Shea (Babylon, NY/West Babylon) had a 3.820 GPA for the year, while Criminal Justice major and designated player and first baseman Natalie Gellos (Seattle, WA/Holy Names Academy) posted a 3.77 GPA.

The Setters saw success on the field in 2012 as they ranked in the top-5 in in the NE-10 in runs, homeruns, RBI’s, batting average, slugging and doubles. Pace had four players named to the NE-10 All-Conference teams led by Bell who was named to the Third Team. Gellos along with fellow freshmen, Hana Wright ((Hillsboro, OR/Valley Catholic) and Jeane Drury (Flanders, NJ/Morris Catholic) were selected to the NE-10 All-Rookie Team.

Bell wrapped up her outstanding four-year career as she finished her 2012 season with a .333 batting average with six homeruns, two grand slams, along with six doubles and 23 RBI’s for the year. She finished her career in the top-10 in school history every major offensive category as she posted a career .368 batting average, good for fifth place.

Gellos posted a standout season in her first year in a Pace uniform as she was second on the team with a .351 batting average. She finished tied for ninth in the NE-10 in doubles this season. She also drove in 26 runs, hit three homeruns and was second on the team with 30 runs scored this season. Wright had a record-setting season for Pace as a freshman, playing primarily at catcher this year. She tied the school single season homerun mark as she finished with a team-best 10 homeruns in 2012. She also led the team with 39 RBI’s as she finished fifth on Pace’s single season record list. She ranked fourth in the NE-10 in RBI’s and was seventh in homeruns. Drury was an outstanding all-around performer for the Setters this season as she finished third on the team with a .333 batting average and ranked eighth in the NE-10 with nine homeruns.

Pace looks to make a big impact on field as they did in the classroom in 2013. The Setters open their spring season on March 1, 2013 as they travel to Chowan University in Murfreesboro, NC.

The Journal News: Sisters host walk after mom’s stroke | LoHud.com

Two College of Health Professions alumni, both nurses at Northern Westchester Hospital Center in Mount Kisco, were featured in The Journal News for organizing an annual fundraising walk in Somers to benefit stroke victims. (Left: Sisters Lisa Mitchell, left, and Valerie Goodwin, right, are seen with their mother, Annie Mitchell, at her home in Somers. Annie survived a stroke in 2009, which prompted her daughters to organize a walk in Somers. / Xavier Mascareñas/The Journal News).

Two College of Health Professions alumni, both nurses at Northern Westchester Hospital Center in Mount Kisco, were featured in The Journal News for organizing an annual fundraising walk in Somers to benefit stroke victims.

Families traditionally come together to celebrate their mothers today, but at the Mitchells’ house it is a particularly special day.

Annie Mitchell suffered what could have been a debilitating stroke in August 2009 when she was just 52. She and her two daughters, Lisa Mitchell and Valerie Goodwin, have gained a deeper appreciation for each other and stronger mother-daughter-sister bonds that they have turned into positive action for the larger Somers community.

“I was lucky. I am lucky,” Annie Mitchell said sitting at her kitchen table flanked by her two daughters, clearly showing that she means she has good fortune because of her adoring daughters and her stroke recovery.

Thursday the women were laughing, hugging and sharing smiles as they planned a casual Mother’s Day gathering with lots of family. Next Sunday there will be a community event to raise stroke awareness and and generate much-needed money for support and research.

Two summers ago Annie Mitchell woke up at 5 a.m. to her alarm clock but found she could not lift her arm to turn it off.

“She had no use of her left arm. When she went to get out of bed, she felt dizzy and was off balance,” said Lisa Mitchell, 24. Her mother woke up Gary, her husband of 33 years, and they both became aware of other symptoms as she tried to tell him how odd she was suddenly feeling.

“I heard my voice was slurring,” said the mother, a secretary at Lincoln Hall of her strange sensations when she awoke. “And I just didn’t feel right.”

“She never gets sick and is very active walking 2 to 3 miles almost every day and going to the gym,” said Goodwin, 29, who is married and lives nearby.

Both daughters graduated from Somers High School and Pace University School of Nursing. They are registered nurses at Northern Westchester Hospital Center in Mount Kisco and got their mom to their hospital for quick treatment.

Her stroke was caused by a blood clot. After weeks of speech therapy, occupational therapy and physical therapy, Mitchell has 95 percent recovered.

Read full article: Sisters host walk after mom’s stroke | The Journal News | LoHud.com | LoHud.com.

Huffington Post: Astoria Characters: The Nurse the Doctor Ordered

Alma Mesquita who earned a master’s degree from Pace’s College of Health Professions and became a family nurse practitioner, was featured in the Huffington Post. She has been seeing patients at Quality NP Family Health, her solo office, since August.

From a feature article about Alma Mesquita, family nurse practitioner of Quality NP Family Health, who earned a master’s degree from Pace:

At the end of the corridor, there’s a wall of glass tile that looks like the sparkling waters of a stream struck by sun. It leads to a waiting room of charcoal-colored chairs and bouquets of fresh flowers arranged in vases.

In this serene space stands Alma Mesquita, a tower of tranquillity. Stethoscope slung over her shoulders like a shawl, she speaks in soft, lilting tones that promise that no matter what’s wrong, she’ll make everything all right.

Alma, a family nurse practitioner, has been seeing patients at Quality NP Family Health, her solo office, since August, treating every ailment from allergies, acne and asthma to low blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Find the rest of Alma Mesquita’s story at The Huffington Post.

U.S. News & World Report: “Amidst M.B.A. Inflation, Executives Recommend Business Doctorates”

Students who choose to supplement their graduate work may benefit from an evolving doctoral business field, which increasingly caters to students who want to work in industry rather than academia.

Some say that business-related Ph.D.’s and D.B.A.’s provide the exclusivity M.B.A.’s once offered.

Admission to doctoral programs is very competitive, and many doctoral students and executives recommend that students get practical work experience between graduate school and doctoral applications, writes Menachem Wecker, education reporter at U.S.News & World Report in an article on doctorate degrees which featured one of Pace’s recent DPS graduates.

Andrew Forte, president of Forte, Inc., which operates the Stroudsmoor Country Inn in Stroudsburg, Pa., recommends a doctorate to aspiring executives. Forte says that whereas M.B.A. programs teach students the tools and methods of how to do things, doctoral programs train students to understand why situations arise in organizations. 

“When I finished my M.B.A., I wanted to know more [and get] more perspective,” he says. Forte has also been able to leverage his doctorate to land positions on boards of local nonprofits and corporations—something that he says he wouldn’t have been able to do with just an M.B.A. 

Students who are considering a doctorate can prepare by getting used to heavy academic reading and demanding schedules, and by laying some groundwork in statistics, says Forte, who holds a doctor of professional studies from the Lubin School of Business at Pace University.

In The Empire: “Pace University’s Entrepreneurship Lab Will Train People To Think Differently”

A startup blog covers the opening of Pace’s new startup Entrepreuneurship Lab. How appropriate.

This is the seed blog for InTheEmpire, a Streetwise Media site specifically for NYC, set to officially launch this March.
 
February 17, 2012
 
 

Pace University officially opened the doors to its Entrepreneurship Lab (aka, E-Lab) last night, and there to cut the ribbon was Professor Bruce Bachenheimer, who was named the lab’s first director.

“It takes innovation and entrepreneurship to develop things that are meaningful,” Bachenheimer tells us over the phone.

The big picture strategy of the E-Lab is not necessarily to incubate companies or create startups, but it’s to spur entrepreneurial and innovative thoughts and actions.

“We don’t measure our metrics by how many students launch businesses,” Bachenheimer says. “It’s the ability to come up with new and creative solutions to problems, and the ability to add value in a unique and innovative way.”

To spur innovation, Bachenheimer and his E-Lab will provide students with workspace for creative thinking, in addition to access to workshops, guest speakers, roundtable discussions, and networking events involving members of the entrepreneurial community.

“If you’re looking at very good innovators, they have to be young enough so that their minds are not so rigid in the way things are and the way things should be,” says Bachenheimer. “But they also need to have enough knowledge, skills, and abilities to find and solve problems.”

To mold a mind into innovative shape, college students need an “experiential education.” People at that young of an age need to be able to expand their horizons and question the norm, or, to borrow a line from Steve Jobs, you need to “stay hungry, stay foolish” to truly innovate.

“You need to train people to think differently, and if there are specific skills they don’t have, let them know how to get those resources,” Bachenheimer says. “Hopefully, the Entrepreneurship Lab is one of them.”

(Image, from left: Neil Braun, Bruce Bachenheimer, Harold Levy)

The New York Times, Theater Review: “A Family’s Songs of Love and Loss, ‘Myths and Hymns,’ Directed by Elizabeth Lucas”

Performing Arts students Donell James Foreman ’12, Matthew Farcher ’12 (pictured), Pace alumna Ally Bonino ’11 and Performing Arts Assistant Professor Robert Meffe are getting major accolades for their work in “Myths and Hymns.”

Chief Theater Writer Charles Isherwood’s review of “Myths and Hymns” appeared on the front page of The New York Times “TheArts” section on February 9 and included accolades for several members of the Pace Performing Arts community – Donell James Foreman (BFA ’12), Matthew Farcher (BFA ’12), Pace alumna Ally Bonino (BFA ’11) and Performing Arts Assistant Professor Robert Meffe.
 
HIGHLIGHTS FROM ISHERWOOD’S THEATER REVIEW:
 
As the original title indicates, it’s a musically eclectic collection of songs that alternates between adaptations of 19th-century hymns and classic myths with contemporary lyrics supplied (mostly) by Mr. Guettel (best known for his Broadway musical “The Light in the Piazza”). Ms. Lucas has shown judicious taste in supplying only minimal dialogue for the new version: the songs remain the focus of the show, expertly performed by a five-member band in spare orchestrations by Bruce Coughlin and Robert Meffe and sung with bright fervor by a six talented singers.
 
Over a simple, lilting music-box melody Ms. Larsen laments the disappearance of yet another lover. (They are all played by the fine tenor Matthew Farcher – pictured)
 
Myths and Hymns

Music and lyrics by Adam Guettel, with new narrative by Elizabeth Lucas; directed by Ms. Lucas; choreography by Wendy Seyb; music supervisor, Robert Meffe; sets by Ann Bartek; costumes by Emily Morgan DeAngelis; lighting by Herrick Goldman; sound by Janie Bullard; musical director, Katya Stanislavskaya; stage manager, Kristine Ayers. Presented by Prospect Theater Company, Cara Reichel, producing artistic director; Melissa Huber, managing director. At the West End Theater, Church of St. Paul and St. Andrew, 263 West 86th Street, Manhattan; (212) 352-3101; prospecttheater.org. Through Feb. 26. Running time: 1 hour 20 minutes.

WITH: Linda Balgord (Woman), Ally Bonino (Trickster), Matthew Farcher (Lover), Donell James Foreman (Shapeshifter), Anika Larsen (Daughter), Lucas Steele (Son) and Bob Stillman (Husband).

The Journal News: Spano names new head to Yonkers workforce board

Pace MPA alum Carlos Moran, former deputy commissioner for the county social services department, has been named the new executive director of Yonkers’ Workforce Investment Board.

The Journal News and the Yonkers Tribune report that Pace MPA alum Carlos Moran, former deputy commissioner for the county social services department, is the new executive director of Yonkers’ Workforce Investment Board.

Moran has worked for 20 years at the Westchester County Department of Social Services, where he has been assistant director of employment and training.

As it remains a top priority to build and develop our city’s workforce, I am confident that Carlos’s extensive experience and involvement in our communities will greatly enhance our ability to help put our city’s unemployed back to work,” Yonkers Mayor Mike Spano said.

Moran holds a graduate degree in public administration and a graduate certificate in management and information services from Pace University.

Read the full article here.

BroadwayWorld.com: “PACE at LA MaMa Presents Three One-Act Plays By Fornés, Shepard & Wilson”

In honor of La MaMa’s 50th Anniversary, Pace University’s Performing Arts (students, alumni and faculty) celebrate La MaMa’s “Homecomings” season.

From BroadwayWorld.com

About the shows: “The Conduct of Life” tells the harrowing story of a Latin American wife who discovers her husband is a child rapist and torturer when he brings his victim and torture into their personal and private life. The play is directed by Ruis Woertendyke and features Kahlil Gonzalez-Garcia, Lilah Shreeve, Jason Joseph, Julie Robles, Polina Ionina.

In “Action” four friends confront the circumstances that force them together and the “action” that force them apart as they wait for the end of the world and the beginning of time. Symbolic, absurd and humanizing “Action” propels its characters into a disturbing one-act journey. Directed by Grant Kretchik, with Xavier Reminick, Ian Cherry, Gina DeMay, Emily Asaro. A.D. Delaney Yeager.

“The Family Continues” by Lanford Wilson evokes the panorama of a young man’s life-birth, army service, marriage, job, parenthood, old age-within the brief span of its action. Highly innovative in its theatricality, the play illuminates not only the continuity of human life, but also the poignancy and bitterness which can infuse it. Directed by Cosmin Chivu, co-directed by Chad Chenail; with: Niko Papastefanou, Spencer Bazzano, Lauren Morra, Nicole Madriz, Turquoise Olezene, Courtney Taylor, Kaleb Wells, Matthew Curiano, and Patrick Pribyl. Stage manager Lizzy Caplan.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Celebrates La MaMa’s “Homecomings” Season with Tribute to Playwrights Who Called La MaMa Their Early Home: Maria Irene Fornés, Sam Shepard and Lanford Wilson

These three one-act plays are meant to continue Ellen Stewart’s legacy of “Welcome to La MaMa, dedicated to the playwright and all aspects of the theatre.”

February 2-12, 2012:

◦ “The Conduct of Life” by Maria Irene Fornés, directed by Ruis Woertendyke
◦ “Action” by Sam Shepard, directed by by Grant Kretchik
◦ “The Family Continues” by Lanford Wilson, directed by Cosmin Chivu

PACE at LA MaMa
Three La MaMa Playwrights: Fornes, Shepard & Wilson
Presented by La MaMa in Association with the Performing Arts Students, Pace University, NYC

February 2-12, 2012

NEW YORK, NY, January 19, 2012 – In honor of La MaMa’s 50th Anniversary, Pace University’s Performing Arts (students, alumni and faculty) celebrate La MaMa’s “Homecomings” season with a tribute to three playwrights who called La MaMa their early home:  Maria Irene Fornés, Sam Shepard and Lanford Wilson.

These three one-acts are meant to continue Ellen Stewart’s legacy of “Welcome to La MaMa, dedicated to the playwright and all aspects of the theatre.” 

“The Conduct of Life” by Maria Irene Fornés, directed by Ruis Woertendyke

“Action” by Sam Shepard, directed by Grant Kretchik

“The Family Continues” by Lanford Wilson, directed by Cosmin Chivu

“The Conduct of Life” tells the harrowing story of a Latin American wife who discovers her husband is a child rapist and torturer when he brings his victim and torture into their personal and private life.  The play is directed by Ruis Woertendyke and features Kahlil Gonzalez-Garcia, Lilah Shreeve, Jason Joseph, Julie Robles, Polina Ionina.

In Action” four friends confront the circumstances that force them together and the “action” that force them apart as they wait for the end of the world and the beginning of time.  Symbolic, absurd and humanizing “Action” propels its characters into a disturbing one-act journey. Directed by Grant Kretchik, with Xavier Reminick, Ian Cherry, Gina DeMay, Emily Asaro. A.D. Delaney Yeager.

“The Family Continues” by Lanford Wilson evokes the panorama of a young man’s life-birth, army service, marriage, job, parenthood, old age-within the brief span of its action. Highly innovative in its theatricality, the play illuminates not only the continuity of human life, but also the poignancy and bitterness which can infuse it. Directed by Cosmin Chivu, co-directed by Chad Chenail; with: Niko Papastefanou, Spencer Bazzano, Lauren Morra, Nicole Madriz, Turquoise Olezene, Courtney Taylor, Kaleb Wells, Matthew Curiano, and Patrick Pribyl. Stage manager Lizzy Caplan.

Set Design: Jeffrey Perri

Costume Design: Megan Smith

Performance Schedule:
February 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 & 11 at 10pm
February 5 & 12 at 5:30pm
La Mama’s The Club
Address: 74A East 4th Street (between 2nd Avenue and the Bowery), 2nd Floor, NY, NY 10003
By Subway: F/V to 2nd Avenue, #6 to Astor Place, N/R to 8th Street
Tickets $15; student and seniors $10
For tickets and information, contact Box Office (212) 475-7710 or www.lamama.org

About La Mama E.T.C.

Ellen Stewart founded La MaMa in 1961 in a tiny basement on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. She dedicated it to the playwright and all aspects of the theater. Today, La MaMa is a world renowned cultural institution recognized as the seed bed of new work by artists of all nations and cultures.

About Dyson College of Arts and Science’s Performing Arts Programs at Pace University:

Undergraduate: Dyson’s Performing Arts Department (PAD) offers Bachelor of Fine Arts Degrees in Acting and in Musical Theater and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Theater Arts with specialized focuses in Acting, Directing, Commercial Dance or Design/Technical Theater. On average, there are 1,000 applicants for every 100 new openings each year. PAD presents over 50 performances every year. Performance spaces range from the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, Schaeberle (black box) Theater, and Studio 501, home to many student-directed productions. http://www.pace.edu/dyson/academic-departments-and-programs/performing-arts

Graduate: The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University, also located in Dyson College, is the only MFA (Acting, Directing and Playwriting) theatre program officially sanctioned by the legendary Actors Studio (co-presidents Ellen Burstyn, Harvey Keitel and Al Pacino). All MFA students participate in the Craft Seminars known to the world as the Bravo Network television series Inside the Actors Studio (taped at Pace’s Schimmel Theater and open to students), hosted by James Lipton, Dean Emeritus and Co-Founder of the Actors Studio Drama School. www.Pace.edu/ASDS

About Pace University:

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu 

Pace Media Contact: Samuella Becker, 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172, sbecker2@pace.edu

 

 

 

Westchester Magazine: 22 People to Watch in Westchester County

Four Pace people – a student, two alumni and a professor – have been named among the 22 People to Watch by Westchester Magazine.

Four Pace people – a student, two alumni and a professor – are among  Westchester Magazine’s 22 People to Watch.

They are:

Taylor Vogt – environmental science major and IBM “Smarter Planet” student blogger.

Jennifer Powell-Lunder – psychology professor and “teen speak” author and expert.

April Bukofser and Marin Milio – fashion entrepreneurs.

From Westchester Magazine:

The Environment’s Savior

Taylor Vogt

Taylor Vogt hasn’t yet graduated college, but the 21-year-old Croton-on-Hudson resident and Pace University student is already the president of an international student sustainability organization, and he has chaired a student advisory council, both for IBM. As if that weren’t enough, he may change the whole way our society produces alternative fuels.

The international organization that Vogt runs is IBM Students for a Smarter Planet, a 50-member organization that hopes to attract a 1,000-student membership. “I’ve always been interested in the environment,” Vogt says. His interest grew early, in large part because of 9/11. His father, Glenn Vogt, today the manager of Crabtree’s Kittle House in Chappaqua, had worked at Windows on the World at the World Trade Center. And though his father wasn’t at work that day, “as an eleven-year-old boy, I took a big step back and was like, ‘Why is this happening?’” Instead of getting angry, he wanted to find—and stop—what he saw as the root causes of the terrorists’ actions.

“They didn’t have certain things that they needed to survive; that’s why they were lashing out. I want to get them what they need,” says Vogt, who believes struggles for existence—exacerbated by environmental degradation—radicalized many who became members of Al Qaeda. “I decided to go into the field of environmental sustainability so this would never happen again.”

His work in sustainability recently has led him from studying the deer population at Teatown Lake Reservation and local cleanups to an internship at a composting firm producing methane gas out of organic waste. “Taylor has a unique visionary sense of an improved future—socially, environmentally, and economically,” says Michelle Land, a professor of environmental policy and director of Pace’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. “And he doesn’t simply talk about how things should be but ambitiously applies himself toward his vision.”

One big idea is to use cities’ sewers to produce hydrogen fuel. “We have flowing rivers underneath our cities in our sewers. If you can sequester the water, electrolyze it, and harness the hydrogen, you have a new, clean fuel source.” A self-described “ideas man,” Vogt admits he’ll need to find someone with an engineering background (preferably another young person) before this could become a reality, but he’s hopeful. In the future, he’d love to work as a grant-maker for the EPA or found a professional’s version of Students for a Smarter Planet. First, though, he’s going to work on that undergraduate degree.

 

The Adolescent Psychologist

Jennifer Powell-Lunder, PsyD

Of the thousands of parenting and family books that come out each year, only a few hundred pertain to teens, and most of those gather dust. But Four Winds Hospital’s Jennifer Powell-Lunder, PsyD’s Teenage as a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual is an international best seller. It’s so far been through its second printing and has been a Top 100 seller on Amazon. Powell-Lunder and her co-author, Barbara Greenberg, PhD, have lectured at Harvard and have been featured on Yahoo! and AOL, in the Chicago Tribune, and on Fox. Mickey and Minnie have posed with the book, and the collaborators’ website, talkingteenage.com, receives up to 10,000 hits monthly.

“Teens in conflict are not communicating well with their parents,” says  South Salem resident Powell-Lunder, 44, a clinical child psychologist. “Even though they are speaking the same words, it is as if parents and kids are speaking a different dialect.” She is out to help parents and teens understand one another.

“Last Christmas, we saw a lot of kids buying this book for their parents,” says Powell-Lunder. She’s already started writing two follow-ups, one for parents looking for guidance in specific situations and one for teenagers who want to learn to “speak parent.”

The Fashion Entrepreneurs

April Bukofser and Marin Milio

April Bukofser of Pound Ridge and Marin Milio of White Plains met at Pace University, where they were both studying marketing. But it wasn’t until they went their separate ways for their first full-time jobs (Bukofser doing PR and design at Cynthia Rowley; Milio, event planning at MTV) and returned to Westchester to raise families that they teamed up for their successful custom clothing line, AprilMarin.

The two often talked about starting a business together, but they couldn’t settle on a concept. Finally, they decided to create custom clothing. “There aren’t a lot of places out there that do women’s custom clothing,” Milio says. “There are a lot of places that do men’s tailoring.” There was nothing stylish and contemporary.”

Enter AprilMarin, the line the duo launched in 2008, which now operates out of a showroom in White Plains and an office in Yonkers. “The line was created to reinvent the old classics,” Bukofser says. “We recreate dresses that are going to look good on every body type. Then we add adornments like a ruffled sleeve or a ruffled collar to make it modern.”

Their clothes have been featured on the Today show and have been worn by Wendy Williams during her daytime talk show. “Her stylist calls us frequently to ask us what’s new,” Milio says. By November 2011, the line had sold between 25,000 and 30,000 pieces—and the business is still growing.

The custom-made clothing is available primarily through their website, aprilmarin.com. “We’ve been approached by tons of stores all over the country that want our clothes, but you can’t make custom clothing for a store,” Bukofser says. “Still, we’ve heard the store market and want to respond to them. We launched a whole line of accessories, and we’re looking into doing dresses in more standard sizes.”

“It’s good to have the interest from stores,” Milio says. “But we still want to have that small-business feel. We have a huge repeat-customer base, and we know what our customers want. We want to say to them, ‘We’re not going to be too big for you.’”

22 People to Watch in Westchester County – Westchester Magazine – January 2012 – Westchester, NY.