Chronicle of Higher Education: A Week After Hurricane Sandy, Students Step Up Their Relief Work

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education by Caitlin Peterkin highlights efforts made by Pace students, despite their own adversity, to help those hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy. (Left: Adelphi U. students sorted donations last weekend for delivery to areas damaged by Hurricane Sandy. Many of the items went to hard-hit Long Beach, N.Y., and another delivery is planned for Saturday. Photo credit: Michael Berthel, Chronicle of Higher Education).

An article in the Chronicle of Higher Education by Caitlin Peterkin highlights efforts made by Pace students, despite their own adversity, to help those hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy.

From the Chronicle of Higher Education:

“In the wake of Hurricane Sandy and the damage it inflicted on many college campuses in the New York metropolitan area, there has been a swelling of support from students, including those who were personally affected by the storm. In the last week, students have called closed campuses to volunteer, organized donation drives, and delivered food and supplies to local residents, among other relief efforts.

At Pace University, whose main campus is in hard-hit Lower Manhattan, students are working on several clean-up projects coordinated by the New York City government and a local church. This week, the university’s Student Athletic Advisory Committee is holding a clothing drive.

Pace itself did not suffer serious damage in the storm, but it had to evacuate a residence hall, and buildings lost power. Classes resumed only on Wednesday. But last weekend, a group of students, flashlights in hand, went to Southbridge Towers, a nearby apartment complex with many older residents, to deliver hot meals to the homebound.

“They really jumped to help,” said Marijo Russell-O’Grady, Pace’s dean of students. “Afterwards they had tears in their eyes, telling me how wonderful it was.”

Jordan Hirsch, a junior majoring in film and screen studies, plans a food drive to honor emergency workers. “I know a lot of students are involved with helping victims,” he said, “and I thought it would be a great idea to have students thank these first responders.”

The drive will be called “The Guardians of the Holiday Meal,” said Mr. Hirsch, an intern at Paramount Pictures. “The first responders were like our guardians,” he said, “so we’re taking that theme to the food drive.”

Sleeping on Cots in a Gym

Service learning is a graduation requirement at Pace, and Stephen J. Friedman, the university’s president, estimates that last year students performed around 45,000 hours of community service. This year he expects much of the service to be focused on storm relief.

“Many of these students themselves were impacted by Hurricane Sandy,” said Mr. Friedman. “It’s particularly a noble thing to do for students who themselves are sleeping on cots in a gym, to go out and help other people.”

Pace has set up an emergency-assistance table to connect students and employees who are still suffering from the effects of the storm with resources on and off the campus.”

Read the full article here.

Westchester County Business Journal: Pace dean mentors nurses of tomorrow

Harriet Feldman,dean of the College of Health Professions, was featured as a “dean of distinction” by the Westchester County Business Journal. (Left: Dean Feldman with nursing students).

Harriet Feldman got into nursing because a dislike of public speaking dissuaded her from teaching. Now she regularly gives lectures to hundreds and thousands of people.

Feldman is the dean of the College of Health Professions at Pace University, running the Lienhard School of Nursing. In her 47-year career, she has been both a nurse and educator, helping to train the nurses and physician assistants of tomorrow.

As dean, Feldman, who joined Pace in 1993, oversees a student body of almost 1,000 people covering two campuses. One of the issues impacting nursing schools across the country is the shortage of faculty, as many find it more lucrative to work in nursing rather than teaching.

Pace has launched an alumni program called Grow Our Own, allowing Pace graduates who want to pursue their doctorate to become tenure-track faculty with the support of Pace.

“It’s a wonderful opportunity,” Feldman said. “The three people we have so far are fabulous. They are a real asset.”

Feldman said part of the decline in faculty is due to a nursing shortage that occurred between 2002 and 2006, as admissions dropped. She said that hospital mergers and other factors led to fewer nursing jobs available, and people decided nursing was not worth pursuing.

But in recent years, nursing has become more popular and interest in becoming a physician assistant has exploded.

“It’s a much more secure vocation,” Feldman said. “There’s more guaranteed work.”

The physician assistant program has exploded to the point that for every 10 qualified applicants, one is accepted. Pace has recently gotten permission to expand its program.

After 9/11, and with two wars being fought, Feldman said that more people have looked into the service industry. Many of her students have turned to nursing as their second career.

“They would like to be involved in a different life,” Feldman said. “They want to become caregivers. We’ve had musicians, ballet dancers. It’s a whole different varied group of people making this transition.”

Men have also slowly started going into nursing, as the stigma of male nurses eases over time. Despite that, Feldman said there are still hurdles to overcome.

She mentioned a survey of guidance counselors in New Jersey to assess whether they encouraged men to go into nursing. Men with interests applicable to nursing were steered toward being a doctor or physician assistant, but never nursing.

“People need to be educated more,” Feldman said. “Men see it as a chance to get into management and see it as a chance to continue their education.”

Besides serving as dean, Feldman also served as interim provost and spent four years as dean of education. In 1984, she earned a doctorate from NYU in research and theory development in nursing science, and holds a master’s degree from Adelphi University.

As dean, Feldman, who is currently on sabbatical, has complete oversight of the entire school, ranging from the budget to the curriculum.

“Everything I touch, I have ownership of,” Feldman said. “I have a wonderful staff.”

Feldman is looking at new and innovative programs at Pace that could be offered to students starting in the fall of 2014. While she declined to divulge specifics, she said Pace is looking at programs to offer students who after a semester of nursing may decide they don’t want to be a nurse but want to continue to pursue a career in health care.

“Right now they don’t have a lot of options,” Feldman said. “We want to give them that shift and bring in a different group of students.”

Throughout her career, Feldman has taken advantage of opportunities to continue to pursue higher education and take on more roles at Pace, even if it required being dean of two programs at once.

“I thought I was just going to be a bedside nurse forever,” Feldman said. “I went into administration and I loved it. I wanted to get more education and take care of a larger group of people. It’s a way to give back in different directions. It never happened by design.”

One of the skills Feldman said is needed to be a successful dean is to be able to hire talented people to help spearhead your vision.

“You have to trust the people to do their job so that you can do your job,” Feldman said. “Everyone I have hired has proven to be very dedicated. I don’t second guess or micromanage people. That detracts from what I am trying to do.”

Being passionate about what you do is another component in being a successful leader. Feldman is known at Pace for her energy and enthusiasm toward the program, and for always being quick to make a decision or reply to an email.

“I have loved every job I have ever had,” Feldman said. “I would not have traded any opportunity. It’s been so fulfilling. People ask me about retiring, but I am having too much fun. I like going to work.”

 

Pace dean mentors nurses of tomorrow | Westfair Communications.

The Examiner: Mt. Pleasant Planners Close Pace Public Hearing

The Mount Pleasant Planning Board voted unanimously to close the public hearing on the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Master Plan for Pleasantville. The Examiner covered the hearing.

The Pleasantville Examiner covered the latest milestone in the progress of the Master Plan for Pleasantville.

From the Examiner:

“Pace University’s proposed consolidation plan moved forward last week after the Mount Pleasant Planning Board voted unanimously to close the public hearing on the project’s Final Environmental Impact Statement.

The board also instructed town staff to prepare a findings statement that it could approve at an upcoming meeting. It will accept written comments from the public on the FEIS until Oct. 15.

The plan to consolidate Pace University’s Briarcliff and Pleasantville campuses is outlined in the project’s draft environmental impact statement. Under the plan first unveiled nearly two years ago, the university would sell its 35-acre Briarcliff campus, which opened in 1977, and add residence halls and upgrade athletic facilities at the Pleasantville campus.

The only resident to speak during continuation of the public hearing on Oct. 4 supported the project. Pleasantville resident Cathy Cullen said the university has allowed local youngsters to use its swimming pools and other facilities.

“Pace has been a great neighbor,” said Cullen adding that the Pace campuses have been open for the community to enjoy.

The FEIS addresses a host of issues raised by the planning board and the public during a previsiou public hearing session in June and includes a series of minor changes, said Andrew Tung a landscape architect for represnting Pace.

Ruth Roth, an attorney representing the university, said the planning board’s decision to close the hearing and its intent to issue a findings statement “is an interim step.” Roth said the project will also require site plan approval from the planning board and variances for insufficient setbacks and for the height of the buildings.

Pace is looking to build three new four-story residence halls for students. Also, Martin Hall would be renovated and three townhouse buildings on the northern end of the campus would be replaced with new residence halls of equal size. Under the plan, the number of student beds on the Pleasantville campus would increase from the current 690 to 1,400.

Among the upgrades to the sports facilities is a new multipurpose artificial turf field for football, soccer and lacrosse with a surrounding track for student and community use; a new field house at the south end of the field would include lockers, offices and concession space; a new grass softball field is planned for the southwest corner of the campus; and lighting and artificial turf would be installed at the existing baseball field.

Renovation of the Kessel Student Center and a new welcome center constructed off the new west entry to the campus are also part of the project. A theater and/or academic building would be constructed on a site west of the Kessel Student Center.”

View the original article here.

Wall Street Journal: As Universities in the City Expand, Construction Industry Gets a Boost

Pace University’s expansion in lower Manhattan was covered in a feature in the Wall Street Journal. The article, also picked up by the Associated Press, details plans for new residence halls and a new performing arts space. (Left: 180 Broadway, center, is part of recent expansion by Pace University. Photo credit: Kevin Hagen for The Wall Street Journal).

Pace University’s expansion in lower Manhattan was covered in a feature by Yaffi Spodek in the Wall Street Journal in print and online. The article, also picked up by the Associated Press and several regional media outlets, details plans for new residence halls and a new performing arts space.

From the Wall Street Journal:

Pace University, which has been steadily growing in the region since 1906, is cranking up its expansion as it moves to develop a distinct campus district in Downtown Manhattan.

Pace is developing additional student housing downtown and launching other projects such as a new home for its performing-arts program which includes acting, musical theater and commercial dance. “We have a very deep commitment to this part of New York,” says Stephen J. Friedman, the university’s president.

In its most recent move, Pace University signed a deal with SL Green Realty Corp. to develop a new 29-story residence hall at 33 Beekman St. in downtown Manhattan, a 129,000-square-foot building which will house approximately 600 students.

The development is slated for completion in the fall of 2015. SL Green also working with Pace to develop a 24-story, 609-bed residence hall and retail space at nearby 180 Broadway, which topped out in April and will be completed by early 2013. Both new buildings will feature amenities such as kitchens, fitness centers and recreational lounges with televisions, couches and pool tables.

While many still view Pace as a commuter school, “that is no longer the case,” Mr. Friedman says. “As enrollment is steadily increasing, more students want to live on campus.”

Pace’s expansion is the latest sign that building by institutions is boosting New York’s construction industry at a time that spending by the private sector has been flagging. Overall construction spending in New York City reached $27.4 billion in 2011, a 3.5% decline from 2010, when total spending was $28.4 billion, according to a New York Building Congress analysis of McGraw-Hill data. Construction spending as of May 2012 was down 12% from its peak year of 2007.

Other construction projects in the pipeline include Columbia University’s Manhattanville expansion; New York University’s development in Greenwich Village; and Cornell University’s CornellNYC Tech on Roosevelt Island. In addition, the City University of New York has plans for more than $2.1 billion worth of construction over the next five years, while Fordham University is also in the early stages of its Lincoln Center campus expansion.

The Pace story began more than 100 years ago when brothers Homer and Charles Pace borrowed $600 to start an accounting school near City Hall. Pace steadily expanded into a full private university with bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral programs in the liberal arts, business, law, nursing and other fields. Today it has close to 13,500 students at its three campuses in Manhattan, Pleasantville-Briarcliff and White Plains, up from 12,700 students in 2008.

Pace’s first residence in downtown Manhattan opened in 1970. The school currently provides housing to 1,965 students, a figure that will grow by 1,200 when the new dorms open.

SL Green is teaming up with the Harel Group and the Naftali Group to codevelop the 33 Beekman building. Pace has signed a 30-year lease for both new buildings.

“Our relationship with Pace is somewhat different than our traditional multifamily business,” explained Andrew Mathias, president of SL Green. “In this case, Pace is the long-term leasehold condo owner and they find students to occupy the space.”

Last January, Pace also signed a 21-year lease for 140 William St. and is gut renovating that seven-story building to transform it into a new home for the performing arts program at Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. It will include a 100-seat theater, sound rooms, rehearsal spaces, classrooms and a television studio, and will host public performances. The renovation, which is nearing completion, is partially funded by a $1 million grant from the Lower Manhattan Development Corp.

For SL Green, expansion in the industry of higher education represents a growing market that the company is eagerly pursuing. The deals with Pace have opened the door into new opportunities for developing residential multifamily housing, “an exciting area of growth for us,” says Mr. Mathias.

The building at 180 Broadway “was our first project built to suit for a college or university…and we are actively looking at other residential developments and other student housing type projects, given our great success with Pace,” Mr. Mathias says. “There is an enormous shortage of student housing as higher learning institutions continue to grow. Being able to offer students state-of-the-art housing in great locations is a competitive advantage for the schools.”

SL Green recently purchased a 20-story prewar elevator building at 1080 Amsterdam Ave., just south of Columbia University, which it will be converting into residential housing together with Stonehenge Partners. Though the project isn’t directly connected to Columbia, “the units may end up being occupied by students and others people around Columbia’s campus,” Mr. Mathias says.

As Universities in the City Expand, Construction Industry Gets a Boost – WSJ.com.

A version of the story was also covered in the New York Daily News, New York Magazine, Newsday, on NBC New York’s web site and others.

NEWS RELEASE: Development of Pace University Residence Hall at 33 Beekman Street in Downtown NYC Announced

This week Pace University signed an agreement with SL Green Realty Corp. under which SL Green and its partners will develop for Pace a new 30 story residence hall that will accommodate approximately 600 beds and offer state of the art student amenities at 33 Beekman Street in downtown Manhattan.

Development of Pace University Residence Hall at 33 Beekman Street in Downtown NYC Announced

NEW YORK, NY, August 23, 2012 – This week Pace University signed an agreement with SL Green Realty Corp. under which SL Green and its partners will develop for Pace a new 30 story residence hall that will accommodate approximately 600 beds and offer state of the art student amenities at 33 Beekman Street in downtown Manhattan.

The residence hall will be located on what is now a vacant lot on the corner of Beekman and William Streets which is one block from the University’s main building and campus center, One Pace Plaza.

Since early 2011, SL Green has led the development of a 609-bed residence hall for Pace at nearby 180 Broadway, with completion expected by January of 2013.

The new project is well-aligned with the University’s 2010-2015 Strategic Plan which calls for the continued development of a distinct campus district in downtown Manhattan and providing living space for all residential students within walking distance of One Pace Plaza, enhancing the student life experience.

Stephen J. Friedman, President of Pace University, said, “This is an exciting time for Pace University. We continue to advance as an institution of excellence, which includes offering a vibrant student-life experience in one of the most remarkable corners of the world. With the opening of a new residence hall at 33 Beekman, we celebrate anew our historic ties to Lower Manhattan, where we were founded in 1906, while making an important investment in our campus of the future.”

Bill McGrath, Pace’s Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer added, “We are very pleased to partner with SL Green on this important project for Pace. SL Green is a first rate firm with a strong understanding of our vision for the University.”

SL Green President, Andrew Mathias, commented, “We’re delighted to have the opportunity to develop another attractive and modern dormitory building for Pace University, one of New York City’s outstanding educational institutions. Our recent experience with Pace on the 180 Broadway project has demonstrated that we can work well with the University’s administration to create a superior living experience for its students. And once again, we have chosen to continue our successful collaboration with the Harel Group, the fourth time in the last two years.”

David Falk and Kyle Ciminelli from Newmark Grubb Knight Frank acted on behalf of Pace for the transaction.

About Pace University: Since 1906 Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

About SL Green: SL Green Realty Corp., New York City’s largest office landlord, is the only fully integrated real estate investment trust, or REIT, that is focused primarily on acquiring, managing and maximizing value of Manhattan commercial properties. As of June 30, 2012, SL Green owned interests in 71 Manhattan properties totaling more than 39.2 million square feet. This included ownership interests in 27.4 million square feet of commercial properties and debt and preferred equity investments secured by 11.8 million square feet of properties. SL Green also owns 385 residential units in Manhattan encompassing approximately 0.5 million square feet. In addition to its Manhattan investments, SL Green holds ownership interests in 32 suburban assets totaling 6.9 million square feet in Brooklyn, Queens, Long Island, Westchester County, Connecticut and New Jersey, along with four development properties in the suburbs encompassing approximately 0.5 million square feet.

Westchester.com: Pace University Names Director Of Athletic Development

Pace University Director of Athletics Mark Brown has named Drew Brown as the Director of Athletic Development effective August 13.

Pace University Director of Athletics Mark Brown has named Drew Brown as the Director of Athletic Development effective August 13.

He will oversee all activities related to the promotion and advancement of funding initiatives within the Department of Athletics and Recreation, with an emphasis on individual major gift fundraising.

Brown comes to Pace from Mercy College where he was the Director of Alumni Relations. While at Mercy, he was responsible for developing relationships with and securing support from alumni and friends of the College as well as raising funds through major events. Prior to the position, Brown had also served as Associate Athletics Director for External Affairs at Mercy and was previously in the Athletics Communications Departments at St. Peter’s College, Fairfield University and Fairleigh Dickinson University. “I’m looking forward to joining the team and I’m so grateful for the opportunity to help build an even stronger future for the student-athletes at Pace,” Brown stated.

Pace University Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Jennifer Bernstein welcomed Brown, “This is a very exciting time for Pace Athletics and I am so pleased that Drew will be leading the fundraising efforts for this important division of the University. Drew joins us at a transformational time for both athletics and the Pleasantville campus. Our Master Plan for the Pleasantville campus has articulated many exciting changes, including major improvements to our athletics facilities. There is tremendous opportunity to further engage alumni, parents and friends for their support and enthusiasm around our athletics programs. Drew brings great experience in fundraising, alumni relations and sports communications—he will be a wonderful asset to the Setter community!”

Director of Athletics Mark Brown added, “We are pleased to have Drew coming to Pace during this critical time. As we consolidate and transform the Pleasantville campus through the Master Plan, we are excited about the future of Pace Athletics and the university as a whole. Drew will continue to build on our alumni outreach over the past year and engage our alumni to return to campus to experience the new chapter in Pace’s history.”

Brown received his Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology from Saint Peter’s College and completed his Master’s Degree in Education at Mercy in 2011.

Brown resides in Mohegan Lake, New York.

via Pace University Names Director Of Athletic Development.

Westchester County Business Journal: MIT scientist to head Pace computer science school

The Westchester County Business Journal, Pleasantville Daily Voice and India Abroad ran articles announcing the arrival of Amar Gupta, the new dean of the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace.

MIT scientist to head Pace computer science school

The Westchester County Business Journal, Pleasantville Daily Voice and India Abroad ran articles announcing the arrival of Amar Gupta, the new dean of the Seidenberg School for Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace.

From the article:

“Amar Gupta, a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a management and technology professor at the University of Arizona whose focus is on linking technology and entrepreneurship, will be the dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems effective Aug. 15. Gupta has also served as an adviser to the United Nations and World Bank.

Gupta said the locations of Pace, in Westchester and Manhattan, make it uniquely suited to his work. “There’s a proximity to a number of good companies, like IBM, and the chance to develop closer relationships with businesses to find out their needs and train students to meet those needs, to produce the skills and talent that will help them,” said Gupta. “I want to see more joint efforts involving business, government agencies and universities.”

Gupta said dual-degree programs are more important than ever today. “In the old days there were clear demarcations between people in health care, law and information systems,” he said. “But as an example, in the case of law, today there are issues related to law from information technology and information technology plays a growing role in how legal processes are conducted today.”

Health care is one area Gupta pointed to, knowledge of which, along with expertise in computer science, could enable students to be “the change agents of tomorrow.” At the University of Arizona, he developed what has come to be known in academic circles as the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory, a system of working whereby teams in different time zones work on a project during their work day. “When you come back to your project, you feel as if a magic fairy has done work for you while you were asleep,” said Gupta. “It’s like a relay race.”

He talked about how this might be applied to health care. “If an accident takes place at night in the U.S., X-rays can be taken somewhere nearby but read by someone working daytime hours in another country. Or in Australia, in a similar situation, it comes to us for a doctor here to see,” he said. Technology makes this possible, he said, and eliminates the need for shift work, which has been linked to health problems.

This system of working can be applied to many different types of situations, he said, and “allows a project to be completed more quickly. Also, there is an international feel to what is developed and, depending on what the project is, it will be of greater interest to potential buyers around the world.”

Gupta also developed technology, on which he holds a patent, to allow for precise readings of handwritten information on bank checks. He said it was only widely accepted after 9-11 when planes were grounded and checks could not be processed the way they had been for many years.

Then there is his advisory work. For the World Health Organization, he helped set U.S. guidelines on health infomatics –– information relating to health care and the computerization of it. In the 1980s he worked with the World Bank, in one instance helping develop a financial infrastructure for a Caribbean country that had experienced a lot of bank failures.

His work with major corporations in the early days of personal computers produced some interesting reactions. He recalled that when meeting with executives at IBM and encouraging them to develop their own PC after Apple had come out with its computer, one half-joking response was, “ ‘We’re not in the toy computer business.’ But very soon after that, they came out with their own PC,” said Gupta.

Just as Apple and other PCs brought computerization to the average person, Gupta wants to bring education in computer science to everyone on campus. “My goal is for every student at Pace to take at least one course in computer science.”

Read the original article in on Westfair online.

Also read about Gupta in India Abroad,  India West and the Pleasantville Daily Voice.

NEWS RELEASE: Amar Gupta, Authority on Linking Technology and Entrepreneurship, Named Dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced today that Amar Gupta, Ph.D., the Thomas R. Brown Endowed Professor of Management and Technology at the University of Arizona and a visiting scientist at MIT, has been appointed dean of Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, effective Aug. 15.

Amar Gupta, Authority on Linking Technology and Entrepreneurship, Named Dean of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems

Splitting his time between the University of Arizona and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Gupta has been an interdisciplinary innovator throughout his career, performing breakthrough research, teaching a wide variety of subjects, and working with such diverse organizations as IBM and the United Nations

NEW YORK, July 9, 2012 – Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced today that Amar Gupta, Ph.D., the Thomas R. Brown Endowed Professor of Management and Technology at the University of Arizona and a visiting scientist at MIT, has been appointed dean of the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, effective Aug. 15.

“Pace is delighted to welcome such an outstanding scholar and leader to Seidenberg at a time when computer science and information systems are becoming ever more central to the university’s historic mission of Opportunitas, preparing young people with the intellectual and practical skills they need to succeed in this world,” Friedman said.

“Today, this means educating all of our students to achieve mastery in the use of technology and a deep understanding of technology’s impact across the professions,” he added. “A distinguished scholar and practitioner, Dr. Gupta will provide vital expertise to the entire Pace community while leading the Seidenberg School in exciting new directions.”

While serving as an endowed professor in the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Gupta had been initiating and nurturing new research, collaborative teaching methods, and other interdisciplinary programs that enable students to receive two graduate degrees and a certificate in entrepreneurship. He was also the founder of the Nexus of Entrepreneurship and Technology Initiative, where he developed what is dubbed the 24-Hour Knowledge Factory. This project involves teams based in three continents who work during the day in their respective countries to collectively provide round-the-clock operations for knowledge-based work. In addition to working on these ventures, he is affiliated with a large number of departments at the University of Arizona: computer science, entrepreneurship, management and organizations, public health, law, pharmacy, and Latin American studies.

At MIT, in Cambridge, Mass., he managed and secured funding for major research projects. He served as the founding co-director of the Productivity from Information Technology, or “PROFIT,” Initiative at the Sloan School of Management. He also directed the Research Program on Communications Policy and acted as associate director of MIT’s International Financial Services Research Center, where he developed a patented approach for highly accurate readings of handwritten information on bank checks.

“The Seidenberg School provides tremendous opportunities for developing new interdisciplinary courses and programs geared to the needs of students in all the schools of Pace University,” Gupta said.

“As one of the premier university-based schools in the tri-state area focusing on both computer science and information technology, it provides an outstanding foundation to launch new teaching, research, and entrepreneurial endeavors with leading organizations in the United States and abroad,” he added. “I look forward to working closely with colleagues and students in different schools at Pace to develop new cross-campus endeavors that address the challenges and opportunities of the global knowledge economy.”

Gupta’s innovative work in that global knowledge economy also extends beyond the halls of academia.

He has served as an adviser to the World Bank, IBM and Citibank, as well as to United Nations organizations that include the World Health Organization, the United Nations Development Programme, and the United Nations Industrial Development Organization.  He was one of the founders of Visual Communications Network Inc., which developed pioneering PC-based presentation software, and served as its chief scientist and vice president.

At Seidenberg, Gupta will succeed Constance A. Knapp, Ph.D., who has been interim dean since 2008. After the transition is made, she will return to teaching at the school.

“Pace provides a wide diversity of schools and programs,” Gupta said. “I want to work with these schools so that the students who graduate from them have all the knowledge they need to use information technology. We are living in an increasingly global society in which this technology has an ever increasing role to play.”

Born in Nadiad, India, Gupta received his undergraduate degree in 1974 in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. In 1980, he received a graduate degree from the Sloan School at MIT. That same year, he also received a doctorate focusing on the discipline of Decision Support Systems for research conducted at IIT, Delhi, and MIT. He worked at MIT for 25 years on diverse educational endeavors and created the pioneering course in global outsourcing. Last year, he was voted Outstanding Faculty Member of the Year by his Eller College students in Arizona.

Throughout his career in science and technology, Gupta has been more associated with business–oriented projects rather than with pure scientific research. That has been strictly by design.

“I really think the opportunities are in the application of computer science in different disciplines,” Gupta said. “I view computer science and information systems to be enabling technologies and processes, the value of which is derived from the way they are applied in disciplines like banking, manufacturing, health care, commerce, and the law.”

Gupta has written or edited 12 books, and is author of more than 70 research papers. The father of two, he and his wife, Poonam, have been splitting their time between residences in Massachusetts and Arizona.

About Pace

For 105 years, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Media contact: Michael A. Oricchio, Pace University, 212-346-1117, moricchio@pace.edu

 

Nursing Spectrum: The right to the title ‘doctor’ | New Jersey Nursing News

In an article in Nursing Spectrum, Harriet Feldman weighed in on proposed legislation that would limit the use of the title “doctor” to physicians and dentists.

In an article in Nursing Spectrum, Harriet Feldman weighed in on proposed legislation that would limit the use of the title “doctor” to physicians and dentists.

Harriet R. Feldman, RN, PhD, FAAN, interim provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at Pace University in Pleasantville, N.Y., [said], “Healthcare belongs to a variety of professionals, many of whom have the title ‘doctor’ as a result of years of education and, for most, vast years of experience,” she said. “In these days of multi- and interdisciplinary practice and multiple points of entry to healthcare, such a concept is backwards and not in the best interests of patients.”

Many states have taken steps to enact or introduce “Truth in Advertising” legislation. Taking it one step further, in January 2011 then-New York Sen. Carl Kruger (D-27) introduced consumer protection bill S02250. The bill seeks to restrict the use of the term “doctor” in advertisements to only those who hold a medical degree or a degree in dentistry, as defined by the State Education Department. The bill has been endorsed by state medical associations, including The Medical Society of the State of New York and New York County Medical Society. Delaware has similar legislation to S02550 already in place.

In New York, the legislation most likely will not affect nurses’ practice, said Abby C. Kurtz, RN. “The quality of care that is provided by nurses, including DNPs, is not sacrificed nor dependent on the title,” she said.

via The right to the title ‘doctor’ | New Jersey Nursing News.

Westchester.com: Pace University Announces New Exec Dir Of Media Relations

Westchester.com reported on the appointment of Michael A. Oricchio as the new Executive Director of Media Relations.

Westchester.com reported on the appointment of Michael A. Oricchio as the new Executive Director of Media Relations.

Pace University Announces New Exec Dir Of Media Relations.