Mark Allen Poisel, Ed.D., Associate Vice President at University of Central Florida, appointed Associate Provost for Student Success at Pace University

Mark Allen Poisel, a university administrator with extensive experience in coordinating and streamlining services to students, has been named Associate Provost for Student Success at Pace University, effective January 14, 2011.

Mark Allen Poisel, Ed.D., Associate Vice President at University of Central Florida, appointed Associate Provost for Student Success at Pace University

NEW YORK, N.Y., December 10, 2010 – Mark Allen Poisel, a university administrator with extensive experience in coordinating and streamlining services to students, has been named Associate Provost for Student Success at Pace University, effective January 14, 2011.

He most recently served as Associate Vice President for Student Development and Enrollment Services at the University of Central Florida (UCF).

Poisel will oversee support services for undergraduate students on Pace’s campuses in downtown Manhattan and Pleasantville, in Westchester County, New York. Working across the University’s schools, departments, institutes, and centers in close collaboration with the Provost, he will focus on improving student retention, international growth, and partnerships with other institutions in the US and abroad.

“Mark Poisel has a solid track record of helping students succeed at the university level,” said Harriet R. Feldman, PhD, Pace’s Interim Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. “His strong leadership skills and work in international education will help us strengthen the Pace academic experience.”

In demand

Poisel has administered virtually every area of campus services for students at universities and community colleges, including admissions, financial aid, registration, housing, advising and counseling, academic support services, orientation, first-year programs, co-curricular and extracurricular programs, services for multicultural and veterans communities, and health and career services. In demand as a speaker and workshop leader, in the last 12 years he has delivered more than 40 plenary addresses, workshops, and presentations at educational conferences across the nation. He is also the lead editor and one of the chapter authors for a monograph about transfer student success to be published in January 2011.

At UCF, he recently provided leadership, direction, budgetary oversight, and indirect supervision for over 300 staff members in the offices of the Registrar, Veterans’ Services, Career Services, Health Services, Alcohol and Other Drug Programming, Academic Services for Student Athletes, Housing, Transfer and Transition Services, Regional Campuses Student Services and the Counseling Center. Before that, he lead the offices under the Student Success Center and  was Assistant Vice President for First Year Transitions at UCF where he also served as the University’s Articulation Officer/Director of Transfer Services.

As an Adjunct Instructor at UCF, he taught a course on “Foundations of Leadership” for freshman and sophomore students in a special program aimed at developing campus and community leaders. For two years, he facilitated a two-week study abroad experience at a language school in Spain and Morocco.

Before his appointments at UCF, Poisel was a Specialist for Student Services for the Florida Division of Community Colleges, coordinating system wide efforts in the areas of admissions, financial aid, registration, program review, and student concerns through a grant from the Florida Legislature and administered by Tallahassee Community College.

He earned his Ed. D. and Ed. S. in Higher Education from Florida State University and his M.S. in College Student Personnel Work from Indiana State University. His undergraduate degree, also from Indiana State, is a B. S. in Accounting (Cum Laude).

He is an advisory board member for the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition as well as the National Association for the Study of Transfer Students.  His professional memberships include the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, the American College Personnel Association and the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

About Pace University

For 103 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Bill Caldwell, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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POLITICO’S Morning Defense: IS AMERICA OUTGUNNED IN CYBERSPACE?

“Assange’s strategy … means he had effectively checkmated the U.S. military and intelligence communities,” according to Professor Darren Hayes, quoted in POLITICO’S Morning Defense.

Professor Hayes was also recently quoted by CNN.com, FoxNews.com, and Nextgov.com about security issues.

NEWS ADVISORY: WikiLeaks debacle — Revolutionary changes may hit how GIs email home

Darren Hayes, a leading expert in the field of computer forensics and security and a professor at Pace, is available to comment on the WikiLeaks debacle and U.S. computer security policy.

Within the hacker community, the WikiLeaks situation is “in some ways a cyber war,” Professor Hayes told TechNewsWorld.

Within the hacker community, the WikiLeaks situation is “in some ways a cyber war,” Professor Hayes told TechNewsWorld.

December 7, 2010

NEWS SOURCE

 

Topic: WikiLeaks debacle

Revolutionary changes may hit how GIs email home

Darren Hayes, a leading expert in the field of computer forensics and security and a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, is available to comment on the WikiLeaks debacle and U.S. computer security policy.

“The WikiLeaks debacle will force the Department of Defense to rethink computer security procedures and change their policies in a revolutionary way. They have for a long time debated whether the use of USB drives and access to social media should be allowed by military personnel.

“Many have argued that it is important for members of the military stationed abroad to have access to technology that facilitates communication with family. There have however been numerous problems with secrets being leaked through social media or compromises with USB devices well before WikiLeaks.

“Technology improvements in tracking wanted criminals must be made to capture suspects like Julian Assange, who was able to successfully cover his digital trail before surrendering.”

Phone:  212-346-1005 (office) or 516-270-6532 (cell); email dhayes@pace.edu

BACKGROUND:  Professor Hayes has special sensitivities to security: he began a 10-year career in the financial services industry in 1990 with Cantor Fitzgerald at the World Trade Center. At Pace he manages the computer forensics laboratory, conducting research with computer science and information systems students. Much of this research has been published through Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). A training consultant in Computer Forensics, he has cultivated partnerships in security areas with agencies including the United Nations, the New York City Police Department and the city departments of Education and Parks and Recreation. He has been quoted by CNN.com, FoxNews.com, and Nextgov.com.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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VOA Learning English | How a Promise to Guarantee Bad Debts Came to Haunt Ireland

Lubin professor John James offers commentary on Ireland’s Prime Minister Brian Cowen announcing measures to cut the biggest budget deficit in Europe.

Photo: Irish Prime Minister Brian Cowen speaks to reporters in Dublin on Sunday

NEWS RELEASE: Doing good badly? Pace University study finds nonprofits may bleed their services by trying to earn money

A new Pace University study of 700 tax returns from nonprofit organizations providing human services in Manhattan has found that their efforts to raise money from profit-making activities may be bleeding the very programs they are trying to fund. The study raises questions about a significant trend in nonprofit work.

NEWS RELEASE: Doing good badly? Pace University study finds nonprofits may bleed their services by trying to earn money

“Unproven benefits” of major trend

NEW YORK, NY, November 3, 2010 – A new Pace University study of 700 tax returns from nonprofit organizations providing human services in Manhattan has found that their efforts to raise money from profit-making activities may be bleeding the very programs they are trying to fund. The study raises questions about a significant trend in nonprofit work.

The organizations included well-known institutions like the Boy Scouts of America, the American Foundation for the Blind, Covenant House, God’s Love We Deliver, the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies, and the Doe Fund, with services ranging from homeless shelters to food banks and victim services.

The study, by Pace University’s Helene and Grant Wilson Center on Social Entrepreneurship, was conducted by the Center’s director, economist Rebecca Tekula, PhD. Tekula presented her findings Wednesday afternoon, November 3, at the Satter Conference on Social Entrepreneurs at New York University.

The findings are timely, coming after the recent collapse or reorganization of several institutions explicitly founded in recent years to combine profit-making and philanthropic activities, including Global Giving and World of Good.

The Pace study is the first to systematically analyze data on a large number of such organizations. Without question, the author says, the organizations are “important service providers for society’s neediest individuals.”

Nonprofits’ “unrelated” business activities to raise money are part of the “social enterprise” movement.

“Myriad philanthropists, associations, and now federal and local governments are supporting the social enterprise movement with growing fervor — [but] without the benefit of an in-depth analysis,” says Tekula. She adds: “Caution must be exercised in popularizing and glorifying the unproven benefits.”

Sales up, services down

As early as 1908, the Metropolitan Museum of Art operated a sales shop, and by 1982 the Girl Scouts were selling 124 million boxes of cookies for gross revenues of over $200 million, Tekula reports, quoting the 1988 book, “The Nonprofit Economy,” by the economist Burton Weisbrod.

By the mid 1970s, more and more nonprofits had developed a “substantial dependence” on non-donated revenues including membership dues and “some form of sales.”

Tekula examined the US tax returns for the years 2000 to 2005 of a large sample of organizations randomly chosen from all the Manhattan organizations meeting the federal definition for providing human services.

The organizations raised an average of more than $1 million in “unrelated business income,” putting it toward expense budgets that averaged over $19 million. The average organization spent an average of 82.2 percent of its total expenses on program services, or over $16 million.

But Tekula found that the more they brought in from their businesses, the smaller were their proportion of total expenses spent on programs.

In other words, as income from side businesses went up, the share of a contributed dollar that went to actual services went down.

Why? Tekula speculates that many organizations with unrelated businesses were not really investing profits in their mission-related services. Instead, profits were reinvested in the business, and losses were subsidized with funds that might have gone to clients.

“The same thing happens in diversified corporations,” she says. “When a division is losing money, there’s a tendency to throw good money after bad.” In the nonprofits whose returns she studied, the odds were low that their business divisions were start-ups operating at a loss enroute to profitability – all had been in business at least a year previous to the years her survey scrutinized.

“Running a gift shop or anything that isn’t an integrated part of your program may be bringing in money – gross revenues — but if it’s not making a profit, you’re keeping it going with funds that you could have spent on counseling and food for your clients,” Tekula says.

No substitute for asking

Though Weisbrod’s prophecy was not tested with data at the time, Tekula credits him for sounding the first, largely-unheeded, warning with his 1988 hypothesis that says, as she paraphrases, “as nonprofits branch out from their central mission, the quality of their principal tax-exempt activities would decline.”

Social enterprise may be an innovation, she says, but one that can tempt nonprofits into a substantial “mission distraction.”

Tekula points out that her results represent a large random sample of organizations – and that not every organization in the sample is guilty of this inefficiency. She has not analyzed data from other areas of the fast-growing nonprofit world like museums, orchestras, and hospitals, though she feels their business activities must also be examined.

For human services nonprofits, however, she suggests that tough as it is, they might be better off with old-fashioned fundraising.

About the Wilson Center

The paper, “Social Enterprise: Innovation or Mission Distraction,” is available at http://web.pace.edu/page.cfm?doc_id=35460 .

The Helene and Grant Wilson Center for Social Entrepreneurship is an institute of Pace University aiming to serve students and nonprofit organizations by encouraging more effective and efficient nonprofit management practices through research, colloquia and continuing education programs. The Center was launched with a $5 million gift from Helene and Grant Wilson, entrepreneurs and philanthropists whose involvement with nonprofits has convinced them that entrepreneurial management can help these organizations increase their impact.

Contact
Bill Caldwell, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

Technology’s impact on environmental problems – friend or foe?

October 21, 2010

CALENDAR LISTING: Technology’s impact on environmental problems – friend or foe?

Pace University roundtable Nov. 1 in Pleasantville to probe advocacy and answers with naturalist, author, and activist Janisse Ray and Pace University Senior Fellows Andrew Revkin, Dot Earth Blogger for The New York Times, and Hudson River advocate John Cronin

Panel kicks off Ray’s week at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies as Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow

WHO and WHAT: Environmental scholars and experts Janisse Ray, Andrew C. Revkin, and John Cronin will discuss “Where Activism Meets Technological Innovation: The Challenge of Environmental Problem Solving.” The event is co-hosted by Pace’s Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, and Center for Community Action and Research.

WHEN and WHERE: Monday, November 1, 2010, 6:30pm – 8:00pm. Kessel Campus Center, Butcher Suite. Pace University, 861 Bedford Road, Pleasantville, NY. Use campus Entrance 3.
RSVP: Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, PaceAcademy@pace.edu or (914) 422-4077 by Oct. 27th.

BACKGROUND: In 2010, the natural world is little improved since decades-old environmental laws were enacted. Environmental degradation is accelerating globally with local consequences. Advocacy and technology have each played a part in successes and failures, but how much should each be leveraged to face new environmental challenges? Has advocacy lost its way? Is technology a blessing, curse, or both? This discussion will explore the relative value of advocacy and technology – and the idea that a union of the two may be the only way forward.

Janisse Ray has organized movements and organizations to protect the environment and has written three books about it, including a memoir about growing up in a junkyard in the ruined longleaf pine ecosystem of the Southeast, “Ecology of a Cracker Childhood.” From November 1-5 she will be in residence at Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies through the Council of Independent Colleges’ Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow Program, leading classes, workshops, informal discussions, and speaking at a University conference.

Andrew C. Revkin is author of the “Dot Earth” blog on the opinion website of The New York Times, where from 1995 through 2009 he was a pathbreaking science writer covering environmental science, movements, and politics. He is now Pace Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

John Cronin directs the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries, a non-profit research center for innovative technology. Among the Institute’s programs is a collaborative network of sensors and robotics along the Hudson River, sampling and analyzing real-time data for researchers, policy makers, and educators. Widely known as the Hudson Riverkeeper from 1983 – 2000, and a founder of the worldwide “keeper” movement, he is Pace Senior Fellow for Environmental Affairs.

Moderator: Michelle D. Land is Director of the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies, where she also directs the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges & Universities. With expertise that spans environmental law and policy, wildlife biology, interdisciplinary education, and campus sustainability, she is a unique national voice for the emerging role of colleges and universities in environmental affairs. Land is also an adjunct associate professor in the graduate environmental science program at Pace University.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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Journal News: “Joe Streany: Keeping pace in three sports”

When it came time to decide on a college, Pace University was a natural for former Croton-Harmon three-sport standout Joe Streany.

When it came time to decide on a college, Pace University was a natural for former Croton-Harmon three-sport standout Joe Streany.

“I knew I would have the opportunity to play both football and lacrosse at Pace,” he said.

If he could, Streany undoubtedly would love to also play his third sport — basketball. Instead, he’s doing the next best thing — coaching it.

Streany will be in his third year as a volunteer assistant on the Croton varsity. And his former coach, Bill Thom, is thrilled to have him back.

He’s a throwback kid,” Thom said. “He’s just a great influence on all the kids in our program.”

Though Streany said he “can’t wait” to get into coaching full-time, he has been keeping pretty busy as a player. He’s the leading tackler for Pace with 30 solos and 30 assisted tackles for a total of 60 after leading the Setters in that category — and ranking second in the Northeast-10 Conference — last season.

Read the article in the Journal News.