Forbes blog: “Dear Valued Customer, The Real Reason Your Email Address is Out in the Wild is This ….”

“There is a cost to encryption and many companies will not pay,” says Darren Hayes, chair of Pace’s Computer Information Systems Program.

 . . . Laws such as the California Database Breach Act require that customers must be informed when their data is compromised, Darren Hayes, chair of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, points out. “However, the law does not stipulate any liability if the customer becomes a victim of identity theft.”

. . . Hayes reports that many Fortune 500 companies have outsourced their server management to third parties and do not fully understand how secure their customer records are. Internal security processes tend to be very poor as well, he says. For instance, companies are still not requiring their employees to encrypt their laptops and USB devices that are attached to company computers. “Very recently a BP employee lost an unencrypted laptop with claimant information,“ Hayes says. “There is a cost to encryption and many companies will not pay.” Read the blog on Forbes.com.

NEWS ADVISORY: Economic impact of the disaster in Japan

“Expect a positive impact on GDP due to higher fixed investment, increased fiscal stimulus, and quantitative easing by the Bank of Japan, ” said Pace finance professor Niso Abuaf.

March 28, 2011

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Economic impact of the disaster in Japan

“Expect a positive impact on GDP due to higher fixed investment, increased fiscal stimulus, and quantitative easing by the Bank of Japan.”

Niso Abuaf, finance professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York City, is a former managing director and head of financial strategy for Credit Suisse and Salomon Smith Barney and a former vice president and economist for Chase Manhattan Bank.  Abuaf has had past dealings with Japan throughout his career and is available to comment on the economic impact of the recent disaster.

“According to the Cabinet Office and market analysts, the economic effects of the March 11 earthquake in Japan will be direct losses of Y16T-Y25T (vs. Y10T-13T for Kobe); damage to private corporate capital stock of Y9T-Y13T; and fiscal deficit of Y7T-Y8T (vs. Y3.8T for Kobe). There is also the possibility of a governmental funding shortfall of Y12T, due to sudden economic slowdown, lower tax revenues, and special tax breaks.

“There will be a positive impact on GDP due to higher fixed investment, increased fiscal stimulus [bigger than Kobe (post-Kobe fiscal stimulus was $39B)], and quantitative easing by the Bank of Japan. The drop in output in damaged areas will be picked up by the slack in production capacity in non-affected areas.

“There will be a negative impact on industrial production due to supply chain problems, damage to manufacturing facilities, electricity shortages, and a loss of confidence.

“Kobe’s damage was approximately half of the recent quake, yet industrial production and consumer confidence fell sharply that month; GDP rose 3.2% per annum, quarter on quarter in 1Q1995, following a 0.7% per annum contraction in 4Q1994; and the Yen appreciated by approximately 20% in the few months following Kobe.”

Phone: 212-618-6414; e-mail: nabuaf@pace.edu  

BACKGROUND: Abuaf teaches corporate finance, international finance, micro- and macroeconomics, and securities valuation at Pace’s Lubin School of Business. His research interests include international finance, valuation of financial instruments, and enterprise risk management. He is a consultant at the securities firm Ramirez and Co. (2009-Present); and served as managing director and head of financial strategy for Credit Suisse (2000-2008), managing director and head of international financial strategy for Salomon Smith Barney (1987-2000) and vice president and economist for Chase Manhattan Bank (1984-1987). He was a lecturer of economics and finance at the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business (1981-1984).

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

NEWS RELEASE: Pace University 2011 graduates to hear NY State’s Chief Judge, 20-year referee of Yonkers school integration, President of New York Academy of Medicine, visionary creator of 9/11 “Rebirth” documentary

Influential professionals in law, civil rights and business, medicine, and entertainment are this year’s commencement speakers at Pace University.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Pace University 2011 graduates to hear NY State’s Chief Judge, 20-year referee of Yonkers school integration, President of New York Academy of Medicine, visionary creator of 9/11 “Rebirth” documentary

Manhattan ceremonies move to Avery Fisher Hall

NEW YORK, NY, March 25, 2011 – Influential professionals in law, civil rights and business, medicine, and entertainment are this year’s commencement speakers at Pace University.

Media admission is by press pass.

Westchester Ceremonies

 Law School

 Sunday, May 8, 10:00 a.m.

 Pace University Law School, 78 North Broadway, White Plains, NY

 Jonathan Lippman, Chief Judge of the State of New York, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Laws.

 Lippman has played a central role in many far-reaching reforms of the judiciary and legal profession, including the introduction of problem-solving community courts, drug courts, and domestic violence courts throughout the state. He has been Chief Judge of the State of New York since his appointment by Governor David A. Paterson in January 2009. Before that he was Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court, First Department, and for ten years from 1996 to 2007 served as Chief Administrative Judge of all New York State courts – the longest tenured service of anyone in that position.

A graduate of New York University who earned his J.D. from New York University School of Law, he began his career as an entry-level court attorney in the Supreme Court in Manhattan. He was first appointed to the bench in 1995 by Governor George Pataki as a Judge of the New York Court of Claims, and was later elected as a Justice of the Supreme Court for the Ninth Judicial District and served as an Associate Justice of the Appellate Term for the Ninth and Tenth Judicial Districts. He is a member of the Conference of Chief Justices, former President of the Conference of State Court Administrators, and former Vice-Chair of the Board of the National Center for State Courts.

 Westchester Undergraduate

 Friday, May 20, 11:00 a.m.

 Ann & Alfred Goldstein Health and Fitness Center, Pleasantville Campus, 861 Bedford Rd., Pleasantville, NY, entrance # 3

Joseph M. Pastore, Jr., PhD, Professor Emeritus (in Residence) at Pace’s Lubin School of Business, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters.

Pastore, a much sought-after expert on business management, university administrator, and mediator, for twenty years from 1986-2006 was Monitor and Special Master overseeing the desegregation of the Yonkers, New York, public schools in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Brown v. Board of Education. A graduate of St. Bonaventure University who earned his Ph.D. from Saint Louis University, he has authored, co-authored, or edited over forty articles, monographs, papers, and book chapters and has lectured in executive development programs for such organizations as Verizon Communications, British Telecommunications, AT&T, Swiss Re, Monsanto, IBM, Prudential-Bache Securities, Technicon, Corning, Reader’s Digest, and Dresser Industries.

In higher education, at St. Bonaventure University he served as Dean of the School of Business and Vice President and Provost before moving to Pace in 1973. There he has been Dean of the Lubin School of Business, Vice President and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, and from 1985 to 1991, University Provost. He served as Executive Vice President of Boston College from 1991 to 1993, before returning to Pace as a professor. 

New York City Ceremonies

This year, Pace’s Manhattan ceremonies will be held in Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center, with overflow seating in an air conditioned tent on the adjoining plaza. The University secured the hall after an exhaustive search for a replacement for its usual venue, Radio City Music Hall, which displaced the graduations of many institutions due to performances of Cirque du Soleil. Madison Square Garden, a larger possible alternative, also is closed due to renovations.

New York Undergraduate

Sunday, May 22, 10:30 a.m.

Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center (northern end of the Lincoln Center Plaza, corner of Columbus Avenue and 65th Street.)

Jo Ivey Boufford, MD, President of The New York Academy of Medicine, will receive an honorary Doctorate of Science.

Boufford, a pediatrician, is a nationally-respected authority on health care. She served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health in the US Department of Health and Human Services from November 1993 to January 1997, and as Acting Assistant Secretary from January 1997 to May 1997. Earlier, she served as President of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC), the largest municipal health system in the United States. In addition to heading the New York Academy of Medicine, she is Professor of Public Service, Health Policy, and Management at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, where she was dean from 1997 to 2002, and is Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at New York University School of Medicine.

A graduate of University of Michigan who earned her MD, with distinction, from the University of Michigan Medical School, her international experience includes service as the US representative on the Executive Board of the World Health Organization (WHO), and work as Director of the King’s Fund College in London, a royal charity dedicated to the support of health and social services throughout the United Kingdom. She is now Chair of the board for the Center for Health Care Strategies and serves on the boards of the United Hospital Fund, the Primary Care Development Corporation, and Public Health Solutions (formerly MHRA).

Westchester and New York City Graduate

Sunday, May 22, 4:00 p.m.

Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center

Jim Whitaker, Chairman of Whitaker Entertainment, based at Walt Disney Pictures, will receive an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts.

Whitaker is the founder and director of “Rebirth,” a new feature-length documentary which reviewers called “both a work of art and of the heart” and “a real emotional powerhouse and a staggering achievement” after its premiere at the 2011 Sundance festival. Six months after 9/11, Whitaker’s Project Rebirth installed three time-lapse cameras (now increased to 14) in and around the site, recording a frame of film every five minutes, 24 hours a day. The resulting film combines that photography with the intimate stories of ten survivors of the attack who Whitaker has followed for the past nine years as they coped with grief and stress.

Whitaker, a Georgetown University graduate who earned his MFA from the University of Southern California, began his career at Imagine Entertainment as an intern assisting craft services on John Waters’ “Hairspray.” He became President of Motion Picture Production in 2004. He has executive produced such films as “The Changeling,” “American Gangster,” “Cinderella Man,” “Friday Night Lights,” “8 Mile,” and “Curious George.”

About Pace University

For 105 years, Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

LewRockwell.com: “The Fed Is Wrecking the Dollar” by Joseph T. Salerno

“[worry about deflation]… has been promoted by many mainstream economists, most notably former Fed Chairman Greenspan and current Fed chairman Bernanke. But… The fear of falling prices is a phobia … which has no rational basis in economic theory or history.” Testimony by economics professor Joseph T. Salerno before the US House of Representatives, Committee on Financial Services, Subcommittee on Monetary Policy, March 17, 2011.

“[worry about deflation]…  has been promoted by many mainstream economists, most notably former Fed Chairman Greenspan and current Fed chairman Bernanke. But… The fear of falling prices is a phobia … which has no rational basis in economic theory or history.” Testimony by economics professor Joseph T. Salerno before the US House of Representatives, Committee on Financial Services, Subcommittee on Monetary Policy, March 17, 2011.

See the video on YouTube

Nieman Watchdog: “8 questions about online privacy”

Will the U.S. follow Europe’s lead in establishing strict online privacy rules? Or will powerful interests have their way and maintain the status quo? Darren Hayes, a Pace expert in computer security, poses questions that should come up before, during, or after a Senate Commerce Committee hearing into the topic. Read the article on Nieman Watchdog, a web site of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.

Will the U.S. follow Europe’s lead in establishing strict online privacy rules? Or will powerful interests have their way and maintain the status quo? Darren Hayes, a Pace expert in computer security, poses questions that should come up before, during, or after a Senate Commerce Committee hearing into the topic. Read the article on Nieman Watchdog, a web site of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard.

WSJ MarketBeat: “Redemption Song: How Fees Help Mutual Fund Investors.”

A new study by finance professors Iuliana Ismailescu and Matthew Morey was covered by two influential finance mediums: Ignites, a Financial Times service distributed to more than 50,000 leaders across the world of mutual funds; and WSJ MarketBeat, a blog with monthly traffic of 525,892 visitors and 878,282 page views.

A new study by finance professors Iuliana Ismailescu and Matthew Morey was covered by two influential finance mediums:  Ignites, a Financial Times service distributed to more than 50,000 leaders across the world of mutual funds; and WSJ MarketBeat, a blog with monthly traffic of 525,892 visitors and 878,282 page views.

Yahoo! Shine: “8 college classes everyone should take—and why”

“The professional related courses will get a student an interview,” says Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University in New York and the author of The Secret to Getting a Job After College.”But the courses that teach a student to think and communicate will better assist them in acing the interview!”

“The professional related courses will get a student an interview,” says Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University in New York and the author of The Secret to Getting a Job After College.”But the courses that teach a student to think and communicate will better assist them in acing the interview!” Shine, a website from Yahoo! targeting women from the ages of 25 to 54, has over a hundred million page views per month. 

Newsweek: “I Can’t Think!”

In an age when decision science is documenting breakdowns in decision-making due to an overload of digitized information, “We’re fooled by immediacy and quantity and think it’s quality,” says Eric Kessler, a management expert at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “What starts driving decisions is the urgent rather than the important.”

 

In an age when decision science is documenting breakdowns in decision-making due to an overload of digitized information, “We’re fooled by immediacy and quantity and think it’s quality,” says Eric Kessler, a management expert at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business. “What starts driving decisions is the urgent rather than the important.” He was quoted in a long Newsweek article.

New York Times: “A Campaign to Introduce Keds to a New Generation”

Pace is one of nine colleges across the nation “with strong arts or fashion-based programs,” according to Keds sneakers.

 

Pace is one of nine colleges across the nation “with strong arts or fashion-based programs,” according to Keds sneakers. Beginning in March, the brand is taking  a van in the form of a shoebox to those campuses as part of a repositioning campaign stressing creativity and public service.  Read the New York Times article.

Government Executive Magazine: “TRENDS Service Interrupted – WikiLeaks fiasco reinforces push to set security standards for cloud services”

Darren R. Hayes, a computer forensics and security professor, comments on the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program. Hayes is becoming a top expert in a variety of publications.

“At first sight, you wonder why in the wake of WikiLeaks they would want to work from the cloud and use third parties,” says Darren R. Hayes, a computer forensics and security professor at New York’s Pace University. But the real issue, he notes, is the human element. “The amount of access, and access to documents that he didn’t need to view, that is important to consider,” Hayes says, referring to alleged leaker Pfc. Bradley Manning.  Read the article.

Also read more comments from Hayes:  CNN.comCorporate Compliance Insights, eWeek.com [ 1 | 2 ], FoxNews.com, POLITICO’S Morning Defense, TechNewsWorld [ 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 ]