New York Times: “Across Generations, Gathering Insights – A Review of ‘4000 Miles,’ at Pace University”

Alice Cannon as Vera and Jacob Perkins as Leo in the Hudson Stage Company’s production of “4000 Miles” at Woodward Hall Theater at Pace University.

Alice Cannon as Vera and Jacob Perkins as Leo in the Hudson Stage Company’s production of “4000 Miles” at Woodward Hall Theater at Pace University.

Read the New York Times Theater Review.

 

Business Insider: “The CIA Hemorrhages Spies To Top Wall Street Firms”

. . . “There are trillions of dollars of illegal currency in constant circulation. Improved enforcement on transactions is a must, and regulators are pressing for more and better training of professionals in the financial institution sector,” said John James, executive director at the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University in New York.

. . . “There are trillions of dollars of illegal currency in constant circulation. Improved enforcement on transactions is a must, and regulators are pressing for more and better training of professionals in the financial institution sector,” said John James, executive director at the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University in New York.

Read the story by Business Insider.

TheStreet: “Snark-Nado: What Happened With JP Morgan’s Epic Twitter Fail”

. . . “This was a highly unusual move by JP Morgan, given the nature of recent news stories about the company and the large fines being levied on the bank,” says Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York. “Companies like JP Morgan are careful about who can ask questions during earnings calls and at other events, so I am surprised that they planned this open dialog and Q&A session.”

. . . “This was a highly unusual move by JP Morgan, given the nature of recent news stories about the company and the large fines being levied on the bank,” says Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York. “Companies like JP Morgan are careful about who can ask questions during earnings calls and at other events, so I am surprised that they planned this open dialog and Q&A session.”

Read the story on TheStreet.

Associated Press: “Beyond Twitter: The next wave of tech IPOs brews”

. . . Many of the companies that are producing revenue rely on advertising, a dependence that worries Larry Chiagouris, marketing professor Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

. . . Many of the companies that are producing revenue rely on advertising, a dependence that worries Larry Chiagouris, marketing professor Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

“If you fast-forward beyond the next 24 months, people will realize that these companies just aren’t going to make a lot of money,” he says. “Advertisers are not putting a large portion of their budgets into these companies.”

Chiagouris thinks the stampede to invest in Twitter and other money-losing startups is heading in the same direction as the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s when a horde of unprofitable Internet companies were ushered on to Wall Street.

“People are chasing the dream of profits as opposed to any evidence of profits,” Chiagouris says. “And it’s a hope, it’s a wish, it’s a dream, but that’s all it is right now.”

Read the story by the Associated Press.

CNN: “Jimmy Kimmel Sketch Sparks Massive Protests”

Watch an interview featuring Chunyan Li, an accounting professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business who attended rallies in New York.

Watch an interview featuring Chunyan Li, an accounting professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business who attended rallies in New York.

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace University to Host Annual Meeting of American Physical Society, Saturday, November 16

Pace University’s School of Education will host the 109th Annual Meeting of the New York State Section of the American Physical Society on Saturday, November 16 on the Pleasantville campus.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Pace University to Host Annual Meeting of American Physical Society, Saturday, November 16

Pleasantville, NY — Nov. 12, 2013  – Pace University’s School of Education will host the 109th Annual Meeting of the New York State Section of the American Physical Society on Saturday, November 16 on the Pleasantville campus in Lienhard Lecture Hall from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The theme of the event is “Physics in Nature.”

This one day conference will explore how physics can be applied to the study of nature and biology. Students will have the opportunity to attend and present a poster—on any topic—for the chance to win a cash award.

Topics to be discussed by distinguished experts and guests include:

•           Ocean Physics

•           Biophysics of Small Organisms

•           Physics of Living Systems

•           Teaching Physics to Adolescents

•           The State of Physics Education in New York State

To register, visit http://www.nyssaps.org/index.html   

About Pace University

Since 1906 Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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Journal News (video): “Mean Girl Cattiness: She Was Born With It?”

. . . The findings of the study—that women use relationships to navigate life and get ahead—is nothing new, said Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

. . . “Indirect aggression”—otherwise known as gossiping, backstabbing and shunning—is a technique women have perfected through the ages, and have employed as an effective competition strategy, claims Tracy Vaillancourt, a professor of psychology at the University of Ottawa, in a report published in the Canadian journal Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B last month.

“Females prefer to use indirect aggression over direct aggression (i.e. verbal and physical aggression) because this … maximizes the harm inflicted on the victim while minimizing the personal danger involved,” according to the report. “The risk to the perpetrator is lower because he/she often remains anonymous.”

The findings of the study—that women use relationships to navigate life and get ahead—is nothing new, said Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, an adjunct professor of psychology at Pace University.

“Whenever studies like this come out, we tend to make generalizations, and yes, women use relationships to get ahead,” said Powell-Lunder, a co-author of the book, “Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual. “The survival of the fittest for men is based on physical prowess. Even in the businesses world, men who show they are fierce and strong with their voice and body language are revered. For women, it’s more about learning to negotiate systems through relationships to get where they need to go. And unfortunately, that has its negatives.”

Watch the video on Journal News blog The Hall Monitor.

 

Agence France Presse: “Twitter hits Wall Street with a bang”

. . . “There’s always going to be investor mania, but it doesn’t tell us anything about the future,” said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

. . . “There’s always going to be investor mania, but it doesn’t tell us anything about the future,” said Larry Chiagouris, a professor of marketing at Pace University.

“The fundamental question is how much people have to say on Twitter. We know there are some people who are social and want to talk all the time, but you can’t make a business model on those people.”

Chiagouris added that “large corporations with hundreds of millions of dollars have not put substantial sums into paid media with Facebook and Twitter.”

“They all are experimenting but nobody is putting 25 percent in social media. It may not sound cool but traditional media is still the media of choice today,” he said.

Read the story by Agence France Presse.

Read more comments by Prof. Chiagouris in the Guardian (UK).

Washington Post: “Twitter IPO: Buzz builds over risks and (possible) rewards”

. . . Twitter’s ad products show potential, but the company might not be able to turn its platform into an indispensable tool for marketers, said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York.

. . . Twitter’s ad products show potential, but the company might not be able to turn its platform into an indispensable tool for marketers, said Larry Chiagouris, a marketing professor at Pace University in New York.

As a whole, social media haven’t provided the return on investment that many advertisers want, he said. Twitter’s emphasis on real-time conversation about events such as the Super Bowl or the Academy Awards means even the strongest ads don’t have much lasting value, Chiagouris said.

“Those event-driven tweets are highly limited,” he said. “On the day-to-day kind of things, most people don’t have a lot to say. And most other people don’t care to hear what others are saying.”

Read the article in the Washington Post.

Read more comments by Prof. Chiagouris in San Jose Mercury News.

MacNewsWorld: “Apple to Put Down Roots in Arizona”

. . . The fact that Mesa is a rising education hub likely influenced Apple’s decision, said Joseph Pastore, professor emeritus at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

. . . The fact that Mesa is a rising education hub likely influenced Apple’s decision, said Joseph Pastore, professor emeritus at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business.

“Companies like to locate where there is talent,” he told MacNewsWorld. “[Mesa] has been undergoing an interesting initiative to bring higher education to its city. It has attracted five colleges from various points in the U.S. to add branches in Mesa. The fundamentals for plant location in Mesa are emerging in the form of a concentration of an educated workforce.”