Crain’s New York Business, Education Report: “Startup Factories”

New York’s colleges are stepping up support of budding entrepreneurs with courses, mentoring, networking, awards. High marks were given to Pace’s Lubin School of Business, where a 2011 pitch contest drew an audience of 400 — including venture capitalists, angel investors and bankers.

A special Education Report in the April 23 issue of Crain’s New York Business focuses on how New York’s colleges and universities have ratcheted up their commitment to supporting budding entrepreneurs in recent years.  With courses, mentoring, networking and cash awards, they are growing crops of would-be entrepreneurs that they say are far better prepared than their predecessors. 

Lubin Professor Bruce Bachenheimer,  Director of Pace’s new Entrepreneurship Lab, was interviewed by Steve Garmhausen for the article and his comments are highlighted below.  Read the Education Report in its entirety by clicking here:

  • One of the latest manifestations of the trend: the February launch, by Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, of an entrepreneurship lab that aims to facilitate collaborations between students in schools as diverse as nursing and business.  “The idea is that it will involve all Pace students and faculty from all the schools,” said Bruce Bachenheimer, director of the lab and of Lubin’s entrepreneurship program. “We’re stressing an interdisciplinary, hands-on experience to find new ways to solve difficult problems.”
  • Entrepreneurship programs are trying to teach just about everything else. The most straightforward subjects include writing a business plan and doing financial, competitive and market analysis.  “When it comes to the harder stuff, such as the ability to recognize opportunities, Pace and other schools use case studies, brainstorming lessons and other exercises to nurture that skill. “It’s kind of like teaching music or painting,” explained Mr. Bachenheimer.
  • Pitch programs—in which teams of students, alumni and others vie for cash prizes by developing and pitching business ideas—are a centerpiece of the entrepreneurship push among the city’s schools.  Pitch contests have also proved to be a great way to network and meet investors. The most recent contest at Pace drew an audience of 400, including venture capitalists, angel investors and bankers, said Mr. Bachenheimer.
  • Schools are grappling with the question of how to gauge the success of their entrepreneurship programs.  And by one definition, entrepreneurship training doesn’t have to result in a business launch to be successful. If a person is trained to size up opportunities and take initiatives, he and his employer have an edge, said Mr. Bachenheimer. “The nature of work is changing dramatically,” he said. “There’s no more ‘Give me a job and tell me what to do.’ ”

 

 

 

 

The BroadsheetDAILY: “Weekend Calendar, April 20 – 21”

WEEKEND at Pace! Dance Out Loud 2012 and over 50 dancers take the stage of the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts. At the Theater at Dance New Amsterdam, the Actors Studio Drama School presents Week Four of its Repertory Season.

Two Pace performing arts events were recommended by The BroadsheetDaily for Friday, April 20: 

Dance Out Loud at Pace University
A showcase of 50 dancers featuring  Angelica Salem performing “We Rock the World” and “Bad Boy” an  aerial piece choreographed by Joshua Dean. An evening of jazz, ballet, hiphop, theater dance, tap and more! $8, $12. 8pm. Also Saturday, April 22 at 3pm and 8pm. Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street. Watch a preview HERE.

The Repertory Season at Pace University
The Actors Studio Drama School presents its annual Repertory Season at Pace University, in five weeks of theatre designed to introduce our graduating students to the professional world and the public in fully-professional productions of the work they have created during their three years of study. Here you will witness a weekly series of scenes, one-act plays and full-length plays, some of them written by our playwrights, and all of them directed by our directors and acted by our actors. Free. Reservations recommended; call (212) 501-2099 or email:  ASDSRep@pace.edu. Through April 28. Wed-Fri 8pm. Sat 3pm & 8pm.

BroadwayWorld.com: Photo Flash: “Week Four Scenes -The Actors Studio Drama School 2012 MFA Repertory Season”

LOVE, LOVE, LOVE! Week Four of The Actors Studio Drama School’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season brings scenes from THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE (a young actress who has sworn off love gets stuck entertaining a soldier on leave), ORANGE FLOWER WATER (infidelity and the consequences of a romantic affair) and RED LIGHT WINTER (college buddies take off to the Netherlands and find themselves thrown into a bizarre love triangle). Free admission. Reservations: (212) 501-2099; ASDSRep@pace.edu

The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season (April 18 – 21) presents:  Scenes from the THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE, ORANGE FLOWER WATER, and RED LIGHT WINTER.
 
We have a peek at the production photos from all shows here!
 
Scenes from THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE (pictured), a romantic comedy by John William Van Druten dealing with the challenges of the single life in New York City during World War II.  Sally Middleton (Rachael Schefrin) is a young and struggling actress. She agrees to a date with Bill Page (Peter Marciano), a soldier on a weekend pass, after he’s stood up by her worldly friend, Olive. When Bill has a problem getting a hotel room, he ends up spending the weekend with Sally at her apartment. Both have to fight temptation as they become attracted to one another. Directed by Chris Triebel.
 
Scenes from ORANGE FLOWER WATER by Craig Wright tells the story of two ordinary married couples David (Daniel J. O’Brien) and Cathy (Kaitlyn Huczko) Larson and Brad (Jake Cullens) and Beth (Kara Marie Rosella) Youngquist who live with their children in the relatively peaceful town of Pine City, Minnesota. After years of maintaining a platonic friendship, David and Beth begin an adulterous affair with disastrous consequences. Directed by Colleen Britt.
 
A scene from RED LIGHT WINTER by Adam Rapp. A Pulitzer Prize finalist in 2006, this is the story of two 30-year-old college buddies who are vacationing together in Amsterdam.  Davis (Adam Petherbridge) is a successful editor while Matt (Lash Dooley) is a gifted but struggling playwright. Christina (Sarah Anne Miles) is a beautiful yet mysterious prostitute from The Red Light District. When Matt buys the services of Christina as a gift for Davis, all three lives will change forever. Directed by Ken Urso
 
Further details: www.pace.edu/asdsrep  The 24-hour reservation line is: (212) 501-2099 and email is ASDSRep@pace.edu Free admission.
 
Photo Credit: Scott Wynn, www.scottwynn.com

Back Stage: “Zoe Caldwell at Pace University”

Back Stage, the Actor’s Resource, spotlights Zoe Caldwell’s “Master Series” appearance at Pace on Monday, April 23 at 6 pm.

Back Stage reported on Pace PERFORMING ARTS upcoming event with Zoe Caldwell.

April 23 will find another highly respected actor sharing her story at the same time downtown. Caldwell has won Tonys for playing such charismatic figures as Medea, Maria Callas, and Miss Jean Brodie. She’ll be appearing as part of Pace’s “Masters Series.” Pace University, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce St., NYC. 6 p.m. Free. RSVP by emailing performingartspress@pace.edu.

“Glee” (FOX TV): “Inside the Actors Studio” and The Actors Studio Drama School Incorporated into April 17 Episode – Finn’s Coming to Pace!

Ryan Murphy and the cast incorporated “Inside the Actors Studio,” Bravo and, most important, our school, into a development toward which “Glee” has been building since its first day. At the climax of an episode in which the show’s principals, facing graduation, shared their post-graduate dreams, the final holdout was Finn, who was wrestling with uncertainty about following Rachel to New York. After fifty minutes of music and drama, a scene occurred in which “Glee” reached a significant milestone in Finn’s and Rachel’s – and the series’ – history. As millions of young people in the “Glee” audience watched, “Inside the Actors Studio” and The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University became an organic part of the “Glee” story!

Here’s what TV critics had to say in their Glee “Saturday Night Glee-ver” Recap: Figuring Out Post Graduation Plans which aired April 17, and included a shout-out to both the Inside the Actors Studio and indirectly by association The Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University:

From Jen Chaney’s Celebritology blog in The Washington Post:

Finn to decide that he wants to go to New York with Rachel and take classes at the Actors Studio. Yes, the same one from “Inside the Actors Studio” with James Lipton, a show on which, coincidentally, the “Glee” cast recently appeared. (I can’t wait to hear Finn Hudson eventually tell us what he’d like to hear God say when he arrives at the pearly gates.)

Denise Martin wrote in  TV GUIDE:
First he {Finn} sings “More Than a Woman” and then he tells Rachel he’s applied to what he calls that school that James Lipton hosts on Bravo, Inside the Actors Studio (better known as the Actors Studio Drama School at Pace University). 
Jeff Dodge, BuddyTV  recapped:
I’m Gonna Be An Actor
After leading on “More Than a Woman” in the choir room, Finn tells Rachel that he knows what he wants to do next year. He ended up identifying with John Travolta’s Tony from Saturday Night Fever. He decides that he wants to go to New York with Rachel, has applied to James Lipton’s Inside the Actors Studio (a nice nod to the fact that the Glee cast were featured in an episode of that show last week). It’s his dream to become an actor, though it comes out of left field because we’ve never seen him have an interest in acting … ever. But you know what? If that’s what he wants to do, I applaud him for finally making a decision regarding his future.
From Becky Kirsch of BuzzSugar:

Rachel and Finn recover from their fight about the future, but Finn’s still having serious doubts about whether or not he can make it in the real world as anything other than a competitive eater. He’s basically convinced that he peaked in high school, but all it takes is one magical viewing of Saturday Night Fever to make him realize his dream of going inside the actors studio. He tells Rachel that he’s ready to go to New York with her, and struts around to “Stayin’ Alive” to show off his newfound confidence.

BroadwayWorld.com: “Pace Performing Arts Presents DANCE OUT LOUD, 4/20-21”

Put on your dancing shoes this weekend and head to the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts to experience ballet, jazz, modern, theater dance, tap, contemporary, hip hop and aerial arts like you’ve never seen it before! BroadwayWorld reports that Pace is one of the only universities to offer aerial arts (dancing while suspended in air!).

BroadwayWorld.com highlights the third annual Dance Out Loud!

Pace Performing Arts presents “Dance Out Loud 2012,” conceived and directed by Rhonda Miller, director of Performing Arts’ Commercial Dance Program. The event stars more than 50 Performing Arts students, with a special appearance by Angelica Salem, Singing Artist/Pace Commercial Dance Student, who will perform her pop song, “We Rock the World.” Click here to watch a video. In addition, Pace faculty member Joshua Dean‘s “Dancing in Air,” a Pace First “Bad Boy” aerial number will be featured. Pace is one of the only universities to offer Aerial Arts.

WHEN: Friday, April 20th @ 8 pm, Saturday, April 21st @ 3 pm matinee and 8 pm.

WHERE: Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street (east of City Hall), New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

TICKETS: $8 for students/seniors; $12 for adults at the door or reserve in advance by emailing theater@pace.edu.

Choreographers: Joshua Dean, Lauren Gaul, Jen Littlefield, Melissa Rae Mahon, Rhonda Miller, Alisa Paradowski, Stephanie Torbik; Costume Design: Brain Hemesath; Lighting Design: Graham Kindred; Stage Managers: Elizabeth Caplan & Melissa Leslie; Student Choreographers: Brandon Contreras, Madison Embrey, Steven Langton, Courtney Taylor, Brett Thiele, Ashley Williams.

PACE’s COMMERCIAL DANCE program is an exclusive blend of the highest quality of professional dance training and theater studies. Students prepare for an all-encompassing professional career on stage, television and commercials with training by current working professionals in Acting, Vocal Studies, Technical Theater and a variety of current, pertinent dance styles such as Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Theater Dance, Tap, Contemporary, Hip Hop and Aerial Arts.

Photo credit: Danicah Waldo

 

EVENT ADVISORY, PACE NYC CAMPUS, APRIL 20-21 – “Pace PERFORMING ARTS Presents Dance Out Loud 2012”

Pace Performing Arts presents Dance Out Loud 2012 with a Dancing in Air “Bad Boy” number (aerial arts) and Singing Artist/Pace Commercial Dance Student Angelica Salem performing her pop song “We Rock the World.” Friday, April 20th @ 8 pm, Saturday, April 21st @ 3 pm matinee and 8pm, Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts.

Pace PERFORMING ARTS Presents … Dance Out Loud 2012

Conceived and Directed by RHONDA MILLER , Director of Performing Arts Commercial Dance Program

Starring Over 50 PERFORMING ARTS Students

Special Appearance

  • Angelica Salem, Singing Artist/Pace Commercial Dance Student who will perform her pop song, “We Rock the World”

Dancing in Air: A Pace FIRST

  • “Bad Boy” aerial number choreographed by Joshua Dean, Pace Faculty.  Pace is one of the only universities to offer Aerial Arts.

REHEARSAL VIDEO: Click here to preview a rehearsal!*  

WHEN: Friday, April 20th @ 8 pm, Saturday, April 21st @ 3 pm matinee and 8pm.

WHERE: Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts, 3 Spruce Street (east of City Hall), New York, NY 10038. Directions: http://bit.ly/qxH0g3

TICKETS: $8 for students/seniors; $12 for adults at the door or reserve in advance by emailing theater@pace.edu

MEDIA CONTACT: Samuella Becker, sbecker2@pace.edu; 212-346-1637 or 917-734-5172.

BEHIND THE SCENES TALENT: Choreographers: Joshua Dean, Lauren Gaul, Jen Littlefield, Melissa Rae Mahon, Rhonda Miller, Alisa Paradowski, Stephanie Torbik; Costume Design: Brian Hemesath; Lighting Design: Graham Kindred; Stage ManagersElizabeth Caplan & Melissa Leslie; Student Choreographers: Brandon Contreras, Madison Embrey, Steven Langton, Courtney Taylor, Brett Thiele, Ashley Williams.  

PACE’s COMMERCIAL DANCE program is an exclusive blend of the highest quality of professional dance training and theater studies. Students prepare for an all-encompassing professional career on stage, television and commercials with training by current working professionals in Acting, Vocal Studies, Technical Theater and a variety of current, pertinent dance styles such as Ballet, Jazz, Modern, Theater Dance, Tap, Contemporary, Hip Hop and Aerial Arts.

Still Photos Credit: Danicah Waldo.

* Video credit: Executive Editor Samantha Bassford and Rachel Wildner from PopTV.

The Broadsheet Daily: “The Repertory Season at Pace University”

The Broadsheet Daily is Lower Manhattan’s daily newspaper covering Downtown news, people, places and events, including the five-week Actors Studio Drama School’s MFA Repertory Season.

The Broadsheet Daily has promoted The Actors Studio Drama School’s 2012 MFA Repertory Season weekly to the Lower Manhattan community in its online event coverage.

(Pictured) Here’s a scene from Week Three “Brilliant Traces” by Cindy Lou Johnson. Directed by Chris Triebel, performed by Amie Lytle and Ollie Oliver. Photo credit: ScottWynn.com

The Repertory Season at Pace University
The Actors Studio Drama School presents its annual Repertory Season at Pace University, in five weeks of theatre designed to introduce our graduating students to the professional world and the public in fully-professional productions of the work they have created during their three years of study. Here you will witness a weekly series of scenes, one-act plays and full-length plays, some of them written by our playwrights, and all of them directed by our directors and acted by our actors. Free. Reservations recommended; call (212) 501-2099 or email: ASDSRep@pace.edu. Through April 28. Wed-Fri 8pm. Sat 3pm & 8pm.

The Christian Science Monitor: “No, Chinese inflation isn’t a good sign”

Experts say that Chinese inflation is a natural side effect of a healthy economy. Here’s why they’re wrong, acccording to “Guest Blogger” Joseph Salerno, a professor of economics in Pace’s Lubin School of Business.

The Christian Science Monitor writes that it has “assembled a diverse group of the best economy-related bloggers out there – “The Circle Bastiat” – and we are proud that Lubin’s Joseph Salerno is one of them!

Dr. Salerno’s most recent article focused on inflation in China. It is embedded below, or read it online.

No, Chinese inflation isn’t a good sign

Experts say that Chinese inflation is a natural side effect of a healthy economy. Here’s why they’re wrong.

By , Guest blogger / April 10, 2012

Well, well, well, the Chinese economy is experiencing inflation. Overall consumer prices rose by 3.6 percent in March 2012, year-over-year, including an upsurge in food prices of 7.5 percent. Even the prices of venerable Chinese herbal medicines took an upward leap of 8.3 percent. According to a CNNMoney report, inflation is “the price of prosperity.” The report goes on to fatuously instruct us, “While inflation poses challenges for consumers, it is the byproduct of one of the most robust economies in the world.” A comparison of China’s 9.2 percent real GDP growth in 2011 with the paltry 1.2 percent growth rate for U.S. real GDP in the same year is thrown in as supposed proof of this statement.

But this is utter nonsense and one of the most deeply entrenched myths in both academic economics and media commentary. Basic economic theory demonstrates that “economic growth,” which is nothing but  an increase in the supplies of various goods and services, is in and of itself deflationary. An increase in the supply of any good (or service), with the supply of money and all other factors fixed, results in a fall in its price and a growth in its sales, as the excess supply of the good drives the equilibrium price down and expands the quantity demanded. This irrefutable economic truth has been illustrated time and again since the late 1970s by sharp declines in the prices of items like personal computers, video game systems, HDTVs, digital cameras, and cell phones and of (uninsured) medical procedures like Lasik eye surgery and cosmetic surgery. Furthermore, this fall in prices has not caused stagnation in these industries but has instead coincided with their rapid expansion. I have explained this phenomenon of  “growth deflation” in more depth elsewhere.

What then is the cause of the accelerating Chinese inflation? We need look no further than the money supply. The broad measure of the Chinese money supply, M2, which includes currency in circulation and all bank deposits, increased by 13.6 percent in 2011, although the People’s Bank of China had targeted a 16 percent increase. The PBOC has announced that it will set the money supply growth rate at 14 percent for 2012. This inflation targeting policy, so beloved by contemporary macroeconomists, augurs more rapid price inflation for Chinese consumers for years to come. More important,  China’s long-standing super-loose monetary policy means that inflationary credit expansion has fueled a great part of the rapid growth of the Chinese economy, which is therefore unsustainable and doomed to collapse. Indeed, the pace of Chinese economic growth has already begun to falter in the last two quarters. In response, the PBOC has already cut reserve requirements twice in the last three months.

Having allowed the inflation tiger out of its cage, the Chinese government is now desperately hanging on to its tail. It must either cage the tiger forthwith  and confront the damage it has already wreaked in the form of a collapse in its economic growth rate; or it must inevitably lose its grip and permit its burgeoning market economy to be devoured by the beast in an inflationary breakdown and reimposition of direct controls.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best economy-related bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers’ own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger’s own site by clicking on blog.mises.org.

The Flint Journal: “University of Michigan Flint playwright talks Actors Studio, new play”

“(Writing plays) really just utilizes my strengths. I had a good ear for dialogue, and for me, it’s just a matter of being able to tell a story through characterizations. Even though I can do short stories or novels, I seem to be more at home when the characters are more engaged in the situation,” Sean Welch explains. “For me, it’s pretty exciting to see a couple of actors go up there and say the words I’ve written, in the moment. I don’t think there’s anything really like that.”

From The Flint Journal, by William E. Ketchum III

FLINT, MI—These days, Flint native Sean Michael Welch is living in New York, writing plays and earning his masters of fine arts (MFA) at Pace University’s prestigious Actors Studio-sanctioned drama school. His new play, “All An Act,” debuts during week five of the university’s Repertory Season, where Welch’s fellow graduating students will present other plays and scenes.

But before he was studying and working with the country’s elite, the Grand Blanc High School Graduate first explored his skills at University of Michigan Flint. He had grown an affinity for penning short stories in previous years, but after taking an acting class, he saw that writing plays was an experience that made even more sense.

“(Writing plays) really just utilizes my strengths. I had a good ear for dialogue, and for me, it’s just a matter of being able to tell a story through characterizations. Even though I can do short stories or novels, I seem to be more at home when the characters are more engaged in the situation,” Welch explains. “For me, it’s pretty exciting to see a couple of actors go up there and say the words I’ve written, in the moment. I don’t think there’s anything really like that.”

He cites U-M Flint professors Carolyn Gillespie and Professor Lauren Friesen as his primary support at U-M Flint, giving productive feedback and introducing him to other playwrights he would admire. Before graduating in 2000, he snatched up the 1999 Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival (KC/ACTF) John Cauble Short Play Award for “Earl the Vampire,” and the 2000 KC/ACTF Region III Ten-Minute Play Competition for “Charleston’s Finger.” The former, which he considers his first complete play, was about a vampire who begins a political movement to bring minority status to vampires in America. In “Charleston’s Finger,” a family has a dinner table discussion about how their son’s finger fell into his soup.

Welch moved to New York City afterward, and worked a regular job for eight years while writing nightly. He finally decided to attend grad school, and he was accepted into Pace University’s drama school sanctioned by The Actors Studio, a decades-old performers organization that, according to its web site, boasts award-winning actors Al Pacino, Harvey Keitel, and Ellen Burstyn as co-presidents. After head playwright Edward Allan Baker explained the benefits of the school, Welch loved the aspect of students engaging in acting classes.

“I always considered (acting classes) a bonus, as I still enjoy acting and still wanted to act,” Welch said. He lists the curriculum, being surrounded by other talent, and feedback from Academy Award-winning actor F. Murray Abraham as high points of the experience. “It hit on all points, and it allowed me to do what I was supposed to be doing and what I wanted to do.”

As his graduation nears, this month he participates in the school’s Repertory Season to premier his play “All An Act,” which is about two clowns who have to talk out a drunken night of debauchery to preserve their professional relationship and long-term friendship. After its debut, Welch plans and the play’s crew plan to set their sights on collecting donations to participate in the Edinnburgh French Festival in August.

“I think we’re in a very good place. I have an excellent director and two fine, very skilled actors who…have actually studied clowning, whether while in school or in their own time during the summer months,” Welch says. “I’m anxious to see what an audience makes of it. I think all the work they’ve put into it is worth viewing.”