The Journal News: Bike Lanes Part of Tappan Zee Bridge Bidding Plan

Karl Coplan, co-director of the Pace University Environmental Litigation Clinic, is one commuter who would use the path.

The Journal News ran a story on a potential bike path for the new Tappan Zee Bridge and a Pace employee who might use it.

From The Journal News:

Whatever happens with the Tappan Zee Bridge replacement, it seems there will be a new way to get to work for some of its crossers.

Bicycle.

The Request for Proposal issued Friday requires the teams bidding to build the bridge to include a 12-foot-wide path for walking and bicycling.

That opportunity isn’t likely to quiet the debate over the bridge, which is raging at its hottest as  Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration presses on toward a construction start this year.

Many of those who would most welcome a bike path — advocates for alternatives to driving — are also those who are unhappy that the bridge won’t come with a new mass transit system.

But it would be an amenity many would enjoy. Certainly, for recreational use — say, a bike trip to Piermont from Westchester — it’s a natural.

And it would present an opportunity to advance commuting by pedal power. At least for some.

The bridge itself would be about 3 miles long, so the best opportunities to use it for a ride to work would be those areas not too far from the bridge.

The typical bike commute is 5 miles or less, said Darren Flusche, policy director with the League of American Bicyclists in Washington, D.C.

But there are hardier cyclers. Some will pedal as far as 20 or 25 miles each way, said David Wilson, executive director of the Bike Walk Alliance of Westchester and Putnam.

Karl Coplan, co-director of the Pace University Environmental Litigation Clinic, is one commuter who would use the path. The Rockland resident’s commute now is often a complicated trek, riding a bike to a boat club in Nyack, paddling a kayak across the Hudson River to another boat club in Tarrytown, where he picks up a second bike for the 8-mile ride to the college’s White Plains campus.

Read the rest of the article at lohud.com.

Tribeca Trib: Pace University Students Learn Teaching Skills from Digital Pupils

Pace University’s School of Education is one of 10 campuses around the country using a program called TeachLivE in the classroom to train teachers. The Tribeca Trib ran a feature story on it with photos.

The Tribeca Trib featured Pace School of Education’s TeachLivE Lab.

From the Tribeca Trib:

The first time Aldajana Ado­vac stood in front of her tutoring class of five sixth-grade students, she knew right away she’d have trouble.

There was Marcus, the smart aleck in the back row, Monique, a chatty know-it-all in front who could hog class time with her ramblings, and Francis, a willing au­d­ience for every one of Marcus’ quips. Then there was Maria, in the corner, who was smart but too shy to speak.

“Man, this is B.S.,” Marcus sighed, slumping over his desk as Adovac suggested he reread a passage from the lesson. “I already said my words.”

With the five of them, keeping this class on track wouldn’t be easy, but Ad­ovac, a Pace University graduate education student who teaches in a girls’ middle school, had an out: her students were digital—avatars animated by an ac­tor in a sound studio in Florida who can see and hear the teacher. If she lost control of the class, or wanted to test an approach with a student, she could simply take off her headphones and try again another time. Meanwhile, her classmates watched from around the real classroom, taking notes.

After “teaching” her short lesson, Adovac said she realized that she had given too much attention to the trouble-making Marcus. “The next time I get into a situation with a student who is combative or disruptive, I won’t be so quick to answer everything they say,” she said.

Avatars are not just for Hollywood anymore. Pace University’s School of Education is one of 10 campuses around the country using a program called TeachLivE in the classroom to train teachers. Developed by the education and computer science departments at the University of Central Florida, the program’s goal is to allow new teachers to practice on “students” without leaving the building on Spruce Street.

“It’s wonderful if you want to try out a strategy or a lesson,” said Sha­ron Me­dow, a veteran professor in Pace’s School of Education. “We can teach about a theory, then actually practice it.”

Find the rest of the story at The Tribeca Trib.

Huffington Post: Astoria Characters: The Nurse the Doctor Ordered

Alma Mesquita who earned a master’s degree from Pace’s College of Health Professions and became a family nurse practitioner, was featured in the Huffington Post. She has been seeing patients at Quality NP Family Health, her solo office, since August.

From a feature article about Alma Mesquita, family nurse practitioner of Quality NP Family Health, who earned a master’s degree from Pace:

At the end of the corridor, there’s a wall of glass tile that looks like the sparkling waters of a stream struck by sun. It leads to a waiting room of charcoal-colored chairs and bouquets of fresh flowers arranged in vases.

In this serene space stands Alma Mesquita, a tower of tranquillity. Stethoscope slung over her shoulders like a shawl, she speaks in soft, lilting tones that promise that no matter what’s wrong, she’ll make everything all right.

Alma, a family nurse practitioner, has been seeing patients at Quality NP Family Health, her solo office, since August, treating every ailment from allergies, acne and asthma to low blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Find the rest of Alma Mesquita’s story at The Huffington Post.

BroadwayWorld: Pace Presents TANGO CONNECTION: LOVE STORIES

Pace University’s inaugural Pace Presents season at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in Lower Manhattan continues with Tango Connection: Love Stories, a new interpretation of Tango Connection by the Mariela Franganillo Company.

From Broadway World:
On April 13 & 14, Pace University’s inaugural Pace Presents season at the Michael Schimmel Center for the Arts in Lower Manhattan continues with Tango Connection: Love Stories, a new interpretation of Tango Connection by the Mariela Franganillo Company. Under the direction of  renowned dancer and choreographer Mariela Franganillo, Love Stories combines both early and modern expressions of tango to explore a variety of forms of love—ranging in tone from passionate to comical, tender to tormented.
Featuring nine dancers, four musicians and a vocalist, the  two-part program begins with a series of vignettes depicting characters  entangled in a range of relationships—both straight and gay—and  struggling with the complicated emotions surrounding them. Spoken-word  elements (in Spanish, with written English translation) combine with  the dances to explore desire, gender and identity in unexpected ways. Part  two takes the form of a more traditional milonga setting  where the tango is danced in all of its exuberance and passion, building to  an explosive finale. Two new original songs will be  premiered by Juan Pablo  Joffre and Octavio Brunetti.
More event details at BroadwayWorld.com.

Wall Street Journal: Don’t Bury Cabaret Just Yet

The Wall Street Journal covered opera singer Patricia Racette and “The Man That Got Away” at Pace.

From the Wall Street Journal:

There’s no denying it: The closing of the Algonquin Hotel’s historic Oak Room, where legendary cabaret careers were made, is a loss for New York.

Frankly, though, I’m fresh out of nostalgia. I’ve spent it all on jazz, ballet and horse racing. And as far as I can tell, cabaret-style singing is not in serious jeopardy. The closing of one obscenely expensive venue is simply not a reflection of a dwindling appetite for lyric-driven performances that celebrate the Great American Songbook, Broadway tunes or Edith Piaf and her ilk.

Sure, certain factors are reducing the number of clubs (and the word “cabaret” technically refers only to the venue). There’s the popularity of rock concerts and sneaker culture, plus the fact that tiny venues must charge stratospheric prices for every precious seat. In that sense, yes, the good old days of cabarets on nearly every block are lost.

But as a style of performance, cabaret has lifelines. It can draw from a variety of vocal traditions, which bring their own fan bases. And though the genre is renowned for hallowed rooms, like Feinstein’s at Loews Regency and the Café Carlyle, it is not confined to them.

“It’s very much alive,” said Lennie Watts, the president of the Manhattan Association of Cabarets & Clubs. “If we want to keep it going, we have to expand what the American Songbook is.”

Last weekend, opera singer Patricia Racette crossed over into “The Man That Got Away” territory at Pace University’s Schimmel Center, near City Hall. With a few tricks of lighting, set design and chair arrangement, the 670-seat auditorium managed an intimate feel.

Read the rest of the story at The Wall Street Journal.

View an image of the full print article here.

BlackberryCool: RIM to Host Future Developer Event at Pace University

RIM is hosting its inaugural Future Developer Event at Pace University in New York City.

From the web site BlackberryCool:

RIM is hosting its inaugural Future Developer Event at Pace University in New York City. The event, held on Pace’s campus, gives students the opportunity to develop their own BlackBerry app, using RIM’s HTML5/WebWorks tools. The event kicks off Friday, March 30 at 9 a.m. and continues through Saturday at 5 p.m.

Students will get to engage in hands-on app development, and they’ll have to support of the experts through panels and briefings. They will also be able to learn techniques to develop compelling apps for BlackBerry smartphones and the PlayBook.

The program aims to give students, hands-on experience and access to RIM experts. Students attend a developer panel, which includes experts from RIM and from their developer partners.

Story found at BLACKBERRYCOOL.

Mid-Hudson News: Fairview Fire District considers consolidation

A study with the Michaelian Institute of Public Policy and Management at Pace University was commissioned a few years ago and findings to consolidate the Fairview Fire District with one or more other districts or departments will be presented in May or June.

From Mid-Hudson News:

About 55 percent of the property in the Fairview Fire District is tax exempt, and now public input is being gathered to see if the district’s services can be consolidated into other neighboring districts.

“It’s economy of scale; it’s efficiency,” said Virginia Buechele, a Fairview Fire District commissioner.

“We can’t do it anymore. We have a great many seniors and the people can’t take it,” Buechele said. “We have the highest tax rate.”

A study with the Michaelian Institute of Public Policy and Management at Pace University was commissioned a few years ago and findings to consolidate the Fairview Fire District with one or more other districts or departments – City of Poughkeepsie, Arlington Fire District, Hyde Park Fire and Water, Roosevelt Fire District and Staatsburg Fire District will be presented in May or June after the public input is gathered.

Read the rest of the story at MidHudsonNews.

The Journal News: Cuomo Administration Hits The Road For Small Business Forums

The Cuomo Administration will hold a forum on small businesses in New York at Pace University’s Schimmel Center for the Arts in New York City on July 11.

Several regional newspapers, including The Journal News printed information on Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s  administration’s upcoming presentations on how to cultivate small businesses in New York, one of which will be held at Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus in July.

The Cuomo administration on Thursday announced 17 different meetings that will be held across the state for people who are looking to start a small business or are already running one.

The effort promotes the state’s small business programs and incentives, and coincides with the launch of a new website: www.NYOpenforSmallBusiness.com.

The forum will be held at:

Manhattan- July 11 (8:30 AM)
Pace University
Schimmel Center for the Arts
Multipurpose Room
3 Spruce Street
New York, NY

For other venues, view the full article at The Journal News/Politics on the Hudson.

The Chronicle of Higher Education: At Forum Fueled by ‘Occupy’ Energy, Liberal Scholars and Activists Take On the Corporatization of Academe

The Chronicle of Higher Education reported on the Left Forum at Pace. “Unlike other types of academic conferences, the Left Forum provides an opportunity for academics with similar political views to exchange ideas with like-minded people beyond academic circles and to think about how certain challenges can be faced by forming ‘new chains of solidarity.'”

The Chronicle of Higher Education discusses the Left Forum at Pace:

In the shadow of marches and small pockets of Occupy Wall Street activities that have continued despite the protestors’ eviction from Zuccotti Park months ago, thousands of progressive scholars and students gathered here over the weekend with communists, socialists, anarchists, and other types of unabashed revolutionaries.

They came together at the Left Forum, an annual conference that has grown this year to an estimated 5,000 attendees. The theme of this year’s conference, held at Pace University, was “Occupy the System: Confronting Global Capitalism.” Fighting back was an underlying thread in many of the conference events, which included panels focused on issues of student debt, student activism, and adjunct labor in higher education.

“This is an action-oriented conference,” said Seth Adler, the conference coordinator. “We’re hoping that people will share their ideas and strategies and continue to network beyond the meeting.”

Unlike other types of academic conferences, including those focused on convening people in the same discipline or with the same job title, the Left Forum provides an opportunity for academics with similar political views to exchange ideas with like-minded people beyond academic circles and to think about how certain challenges can be faced by forming “new chains of solidarity.”

Read the rest of the article at The Chronicle of Higher Education.

The Journal News: Suffern High Robotics Heading to World Championships

The Journal News ran an article on Suffern High School robotics team that won the Hudson Valley championship at Pace University in January.

The Journal News ran an article on Suffern High School robotics team that won the Hudson Valley championship at Pace University in January.

From The Journal News:

Some Suffern High School students are hoping their robots can reach high enough to outsmart the competition this Saturday and next month.

The students on the school’s robotics team won the Hudson Valley championship at Pace University in January, entitling them to take one of their two team robots to a mega competition in St. Louis, Miss., in April.

This Saturday, the team will first compete at the Jacob Javits Center in New York to try to qualify their second robot to enter the St. Louis event.

“We’re pretty young at this, and we’re pretty excited that a team only three years old is going to nationals,” said team adviser George Mugno, who teaches mathematics and engineering at Suffern High.

Find the team at their site and on Facebook.

Read the rest of the article at the Journal News Rockland edition.