Westchester County Business Journal: Committee to Save NY Spends Nearly $12 Million in 2011

John Alan James, executive director of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, was called upon to comment on what Cuomo’s election as governor has meant to New York businesses.

Professor John Alan James was called upon to comment on what Cuomo’s election as governor has meant to New York businesses.

From The Westchester County Business Journal:

In Gov.-elect Andrew Cuomo, the state’s business leaders saw an opportunity.

At the time, New York businesses – still struggling to recover from the effects of the economic downturn – were frustrated with what they viewed as a lack of effort among the state’s lawmakers to promote business-friendly policies.

That frustration gave rise to Committee to Save New York Inc., an organization comprising business groups and, to a lesser extent, organized labor. It was established 15 months ago to promote a reform agenda at the state government level.

John Alan James, executive director of Pace University’s Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation, said support from the business community represented a refreshing alternative to the messages often promulgated by special interests.

“This is long overdue and greatly needed,” he said. “I wish them all the power in the world and I wish there were more of them.”

Read the rest of the article at Westfair Online.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Opening of First Solar Classroom at Pace University April 19

Pace University’s first solar classroom will officially open April 19 thanks to a $15,000 grant from Con Edison. A ceremony will take place at the site of the newly retrofitted classroom, Pace’s popular Environmental Center, on Thursday, April 19, 2012, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Pace Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Road, entrance 3.

OPENING OF FIRST SOLAR CLASSROOM AT PACE UNIVERSITY APRIL 19

Made possible through Con Edison grant

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, April 5, 2012 – Pace University’s first solar classroom will officially open April 19 thanks to a $15,000 grant from Con Edison.

A ceremony will take place at the site of the newly retrofitted classroom, Pace’s popular Environmental Center, on Thursday, April 19, 2012, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m., Pace Pleasantville campus, 861 Bedford Road, entrance 3.

The funding from Con Edison allowed Pace to convert a building on its Pleasantville campus into a solar powered classroom. Solar panels were added to the roof of the cottage that charge batteries and provide electrical power to the classroom. A Pace student, an Environmental Studies major, designed the conversion.

Around 300-400 Pace students, high school students, and visitors currently use the classroom annually, with more expected in coming years. The classroom will serve as a real-life model that shows solar power as a viable alternative to fossil fuels, complementing environmental science curriculum at Pace.

The building, an historic, renovated cottage, is part of the University’s Environmental Center, a focal point for environmental education on campus, which also draws visitors from across Westchester.

The Environmental Center at Pace was founded in 1971, constructed around the remnants of an old farm. The farmhouse, nearly 250 years old, now houses office and classroom space, a small research library, and the Marty McGuire Museum with animal exhibit spaces used in educational programs.

The Center promotes environmental education and supports academic programs, including the biology and health sciences, environmental studies, the environmental science graduate program, Pace’s School of Education, and the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies. The Center is a hub for student projects and community outreach, including annual Earth Month events at Pace.

About Pace University

 For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

 

NURSE.com: Back to School – Tips on How to Return to the Classroom

Jane Dolan RN, MSN, did her part to dispel the myth that there isn’t much money available for graduate nursing students in a national cover story in Nursing Spectrum. “There is money out there and students should take advantage of it,” said Dolan, graduate clinical and recruitment coordinator at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in Pleasantville, N.Y.

Nursing Spectrum, published by Gannett Health Care group, ran a national cover story featuring Jane Dolan RN, MSN, Graduate Clinical and Recruitment Coordinator in the College of Health Professions. Dolan provides tips on paying for school for graduate nursing students.

From the story:

Going back to school can be good not only for an RN’s career, experts say, but also for the profession and the country.

As part of a 2010 report, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, in partnership with the Institute of Medicine, called for improvements to nursing education and for RNs to climb the educational ladder. That conclusion stemmed from evaluations of the public’s needs, healthcare’s complexity, systemic gaps and the importance of nurses having educational parity with their peers, said Michael Bleich, RN, PhD, FAAN, a member of the Future of Nursing committee.

Although it may be a national imperative, pursuing an advanced degree is about personal and professional growth and “creating a set of experiences to enliven the cognitive capacity of a person, the spiritual and human dimensions of caring,” said Bleich, a professor and former dean at the Oregon Health & Science University School of Nursing in Portland. “Nursing is a discipline that is robust and expansive,” he said. “This isn’t for the faint of heart.”

Likewise, going back to school isn’t for the timid. Many returning students, who found becoming an RN hard enough, now have to factor in growing family and professional obligations.

Consider Christi Reeves, RN, BSN, who completed an online RN-to-BSN program at the University of Texas at Arlington. She was married and pregnant with her third child while completing the program. Her new degree already has yielded clear rewards.

“I had a lot of clinical experience after I did the ADN,” Reeves said, “but the BSN has helped me understand the whole picture of the patient.” It also helped her land a job as trauma program manager at Clear Lake Regional Medical Center in Webster, Texas, a larger facility than her previous one.

Reeves and educators who survived their own graduate education experiences offer their advice on going back to school.

CHOOSING A PROGRAM

According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, more than 170 U.S. educational programs are available to allow RNs to progress from a diploma or associate’s degree to a master’s degree, and more than 600 RN-to-BSN programs are offered. A majority of those programs include at least some online component.

Here are some key considerations in choosing a program:

Do your homework.Talk to colleagues about BSN programs they’ve completed, Reeves advised. Her colleagues didn’t seem to like their online programs, in part because they were difficult to navigate. But when UTA came to her hospital, she had a chance to evaluate the program and log on to explore more.

Bleich advised asking others who have been through a program about its difficulty, the quality of its professors, whether assignments were relevant and engaging and whether the program fostered personal growth.

Weigh online versus traditional options. Online programs are popular. For example, UTA’s enrollment for this spring’s online RN-to-BSN program reached 4,000. “If you know you like to have face-to-face contact, online may not be good for you,” said Ceil Flores, RN, MSN, CNE, student success coordinator at UTA’s College of Nursing. But online learners have a lot of scheduling flexibility and can pursue programs that might not be available locally.

Get the facts. Ask about a nursing program’s accreditation, clinical rotation opportunities and graduation rate. Be sure to learn admission requirements, such as whether Graduate Record Examination scores are required. And ask what students are expected to be able to achieve after completing the program, Flores advised.

PAYING FOR SCHOOL

Jane Dolan RN, MSN, would like to dispel the myth that there isn’t much money available for graduate nursing students. “There is money out there and students should take advantage of it,” said Dolan, graduate clinical and recruitment coordinator at Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in Pleasantville, N.Y.

At Pace, Dolan said, the first stops are the graduate admissions office to review eligibility for merit scholarships and the financial aid office for information about loans or other assistance. A separate office is dedicated to helping RNs track down additional funding opportunities.

Read the rest of the article at NURSE.com.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Pace University Sexual Assault Awareness Week

Pace University students, faculty and staff will engage in anti-violence activism during Sexual Assault Awareness Week, April 14 – 20, on Pace’s downtown New York City campus. Sexual Assault Awareness Week, planned in April in conjunction with national Sexual Assault Awareness Month, raises awareness about sexual assault and offers preventive measures and resources.

PACE UNIVERSITY SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS WEEK

Take Back the Night among awareness events planned

NEW YORK, NY, April 2, 2012Pace University students, faculty and staff will engage in anti-violence activism during Sexual Assault Awareness Week, April 14 – 20, on Pace’s downtown New York City campus. Sexual Assault Awareness Week, planned in April in conjunction with national Sexual Assault Awareness Month, raises awareness about sexual assault and offers preventive measures and resources.

A two-part self-defense workshop will take place Monday, April 16 at 12:00pm at One Pace Plaza room W616 and Tuesday, April 17th from 3:30pm – 4:25pm in room E327. Also on Tuesday, April 17th at 3:30pm, Marijo Russell-O’Grady, dean for students at Pace’s downtown campus will hold a workshop on Bullying/Bystander Behavior and will show the film “the Undetected Rapist” at One Pace Plaza, Room West 615.

Jen Gaffney from the New York District Attorney’s Sex Crimes unit will speak to Pace students on Wednesday, April 18th at 1:00pm at 41 Park Row, 9th floor lounge. She will walk participants through victim rights and the process of what happens when a sex crime is committed.

Take Back the Night (TBTN), a national vigil dedicated to survivors of “crimes of silence,” will be held April 19 when Pace students, staff and faculty will take to the streets at 9:00pm with t-shirts, signs and candles to raise awareness of sexual assault.

A panel discussion on gender violence entitled “Women and Violence–Connections to Movements,” will kick off TBTN on April 19 in Lienhard Lecture Hall, One Pace Plaza from 5:00pm – 7:00pm. The discussion will not only raise awareness but also will focus on how policies and laws can shape the support and services that survivors of violence can access. Pace political science professor Meghana Nayak, Ph.D. will moderate the panel that will include New York Latinas Against Domestic Violence and the Global Justice Center. The panel will be followed by a talk by Pace alumna Kelly Herbert, coordinator of the LGBTQA and social justice center at Pace, and then the procession through the streets.

On April 14 Pace is hosting Flip It: Students Organizing Against Violence, a citywide student summit with the goal of building community awareness for student safety, sexual assault policies on campus, and promotion through the arts. The event is sponsored by A Long Walk Home, NOW-NYC, and SAFER. This event is by invitation only.

About Take Back the Night Speaker Kelly Herbert

Ten years ago as a student at Pace Kelly Herbert spoke on the steps of One Pace Plaza for Take Back the Night before marching over the Brooklyn Bridge with a group of women and men in solidarity against sexual assault and rape. Herbert is known for her impassioned drive toward justice and change and led the grassroots movement at Pace to establish the newly formed LGBTQA and Social Justice Center.  She is a candidate for a Doctorate in Jurisprudence from Fordham University School of Law and is devoted to social justice work and challenging the perpetuation of legal inequities against various classes of people. Herbert has appeared on Fox News and WPIX advocating for equality.

About Pace University

For 105 years Pace has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Contact: Cara Cea, ccea@pace.edu, 914-906-9680

The Tribeca Trib: At Pace University Gallery, Alzheimers Shown in a Different Light

The Tribeca Trib ran an article on sociologist and photographer Cathy Greenblat who has been taking pictures of people with dementia for a decade. Eighty of these moving images, taken around the world, are on display through April 28 at Pace University’s Schim­mel Center for the Arts. A symposium on Alzheimer’s will take place at Pace on April 25.

The Tribeca Trib ran an article on the Alzheimer’s photo exhibit and upcoming symposium at Pace.

From Carl Glassman at the Tribeca Trib:

Sociologist and photographer Cathy Greenblat has been taking pictures of people with dementia for a decade. Eighty of these moving images, taken around the world, are on display through April 28 at Pace University’s Schim­mel Center for the Arts. “My goal is to help you to see that the person with dementia is still here, and not an empty shell,” Greenblat says in her just-published book, “Love, Loss, and Laughter: Seeing Alzheimer’s Differently,” in which these photos appear. The text accompanying the images below was written by Greenblat. The Shimmel Center for the Arts, at 3 Spruce St, is open Wed–Sat, 12–6 p.m. There will be free symposiums about Alzheimer’s and related diseases on Wednesday, April 25, at the Schimmel Center. Go to pace.edu/lovelosslaughter.

View additional images and read the rest of the article at The Tribeca Trib.

The Tribeca Citizen also listed the event as did Sevenponds.com (the blog of a start-up service linking caregivers) and Catholic New York (the largest Catholic newspaper).

WESTCHESTER.COM: Pace Announces Administrative Officer Appointment

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced the appointment of William J. McGrath as Senior Administrative Officer for the Westchester Campuses of Pace.

Bill McGrath’s promotion was covered on Westchester.com:

Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman announced the appointment of William J. McGrath as Senior Administrative Officer for the Westchester Campuses of Pace.

McGrath, a resident of Hartsdale, is currently Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) University-wide for Pace and will maintain this role while also continuing to lead the Campus Master Site Plan projects.

In his new role McGrath will coordinate all the administrative units responsible for nonacademic activities for Pace in Westchester. He will also work with the Provost’s office and various staffs on administrative matters that impact student life and academic issues in Westchester and to develop campus-based goals and metrics aligned with the University’s Strategic Plan.

Read more at Westchester.com.

The Journal News: Teachers-in-training go Digital at Pace

Pace is one of 10 universities in the country that are putting its students in front of digital classes connected to the “Teach Live” laboratory at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Gary Stern from The Journal News visited Pace teacher education classes to learn about and report on a new teaching tool – avatars in a new program, TeachLivE.

From the article in The Journal News:

Until recently, teachers-in-training at Pace University in Pleasantville did not get to step in front of a class until their senior year. They learned the theories behind curriculum and instruction without having to face the unpredictable and sometimes unruly element of classroom life: students.

But recently, 19-year-old sophomore Charles Link got up in front of a small class of jumpy and easily distracted seventh-graders to teach a basic lesson on the states of matter. When he explained how boiling water turns to steam or gas, the class giggled.

“When you said gas, I was just doing a demonstration,” one student, Marcus, said. More chuckles.

Link ignored the remark — as so many middle-school teachers have before him — and went on with his lesson. It was a taste of the real world for him, even though his students were not of flesh and blood.

They were avatars.

Pace is one of 10 universities in the country that are putting its students in front of digital classes connected to the “Teach Live” laboratory at the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

Education majors at Pace teach to five digital avatars who appear on an interactive board and are controlled and voiced by actors in Orlando wearing “motion capture” suits, not unlike those used to create digital movie characters. The avatars — Marcus, Maria, Vince, Francis and never-stop-talking Monique — have distinct personalities that are supposed to represent real adolescent behaviors.

Read the rest of the article at lohud.com.

PATCH: Have You Seen ‘The Hunger Games’?

“I think that ‘The Hunger Games’ has tapped into this audience by drawing on the dystopian fight-to-the-death genre tradition (that includes ‘Lord of the Flies,’ ‘Battle Royale,’ even ‘Running Man’), but tweaking it a bit with the female heroine,” Pace University English professor Sarah Blackwood told a Bay Area NBC station.

The Patch.com web site in Carmichael, CA, near Sacramento, quoted Pace English professor Sarah Blackwood on the frenzy surrounding the new movie “Hunger Games.”

“I think that ‘The Hunger Games’ has tapped into this audience by drawing on the dystopian fight-to-the-death genre tradition (that includes ‘Lord of the Flies,’ ‘Battle Royale,’ even ‘Running Man’), but tweaking it a bit with the female heroine,” Pace University English professor Sarah Blackwood told a Bay Area NBC station. I really believe Suzanne Collins when she said, in The New York Times Magazine, ‘I don’t write about adolescence. . . . I write about war. For adolescents.’”

Read more at the Carmichael Patch.

The Journal News: ‘Slam Dunk’ Verdict Called ‘Turning Point’ for Yonkers

“I think the jury worked very, very hard and very carefully,” said Bennett Gershman, a legal analyst and professor at Pace University School of Law. “They obviously checked on the issue of credibility because they asked for Mangone’s testimony and Jereis’ testimony. They obviously found that they believed Mangone.”

Pace Law professor Ben Gershman told The Journal News “I think the jury worked very, very hard and very carefully.”

From The Journal News:

Few who followed the corruption trial of Sandy Annabi and Zehy Jereis were surprised Thursday by the jury’s guilty verdict, even as many said they hoped the city could move on from the scandal.

The five-week trial was the final act in a federal probe that had hung over the city since at least March 2007, when word  leaked that an investigation was under way.

Mayor Mike Spano said Thursday the verdict was “a turning point” for Yonkers, adding that he hopes the conviction will serve as a deterrent against future malfeasance.

“This says, very clearly and very loudly, ‘If you are elected, you are entrusted with public dollars — and if you are in any way complicit in taking illegal gifts, you will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law,” Spano said.

The mayor — whose brother, former state Sen. Nicholas Spano, pleaded guilty in February to tax-evasion charges — also called the verdict a “slam dunk for prosecutors,” adding that “it sends a strong message that violating the public trust won’t be tolerated.”

Read the rest at lohud.com.

The Journal News: Japanese Students Tour Hospital

Japanese medical students visiting as part of a Pace University English language program got a tour of Hudson Valley Hospital Center and spoke to one of its top doctors, a native of Japan.

The Northern Westchester blog on The Journal News web site, www.lohud.com, ran a write-up of international students who spent a week with Pace’s English Language Institute and the College of Health Professions and toured local health care facilities.

What follows is a an article from The Journal News about one such tour:

The sound of Japanese has been heard in the hallways of Hudson Valley Hospital Center in Cortlandt.

Japanese medical students visiting as part of a Pace University English language program got a tour of Hudson Valley Hospital Center and spoke to one of its top doctors, a native of Japan.

Nine students from the Pace-Kanawaza University pre-clerkship program visited the Hospital on March 23 and had a 30-minute interview with Dr. Roy Ashikari of the Ashikari Breast Center. Dr. Ashikari, a renowned breast cancer surgeon, came to the United States from Japan more than 50 years ago.

Dr. Ashikari told the students that he has practiced at many major hospitals, but that the day to day medical treatment which is so important to patients goes on at smaller community hospitals like Hudson Valley Hospital Center. He added that he “loves New York” and “there is no where else like it.”

Brian Hickey, Director of the English Language Institute and an advisor to the Kanawaza program, said the one-week program is aimed at improving the students’ medical English and at exposing them to medicine in the United States. Hickey said that the 4th and 5th year medical students are training to work in rural areas of Japan.

Read the rest of the article here.