Lubin School of Business to Offer New M.B.A. in Health Systems Management

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new
master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health
systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for
management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding
of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

“Out of seventeen million jobs created during the next ten years in the United
States about three million will be in health care,” said Dr. Vasanthakumar Bhat, associate
professor of management science and coordinator of the new program. The demand for
health care managers in New York is roughly 1,500 annually, while schools in the state
currently produce only 500 professionals in the field.

Lubin’s health systems management program combines M.B.A. core courses with
specialization courses in the management, economics and strategic planning of health
care organizations and delivery systems, and the legal, ethical and social policy issues in
health care. The specialization courses will be taught by Pace University faculty from
the Public Administration Department in Dyson College and the Lienhard School of
Nursing. M.B.A. core courses will be taught by faculty in the Lubin School of Business.

The Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate
and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes
which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County.

Lubin School of Business to Offer New M.B.A. in Health Systems Management

Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new
master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health
systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for
management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding
of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Lubin School of Business will offer a new
master’s degree program in business administration with a concentration in health
systems management beginning September 1997. The program will prepare students for
management positions who are able to combine leadership skills with an understanding
of the ethical and policy issues of the complex health care field.

“Out of seventeen million jobs created during the next ten years in the United
States about three million will be in health care,” said Dr. Vasanthakumar Bhat, associate
professor of management science and coordinator of the new program. The demand for
health care managers in New York is roughly 1,500 annually, while schools in the state
currently produce only 500 professionals in the field.

Lubin’s health systems management program combines M.B.A. core courses with
specialization courses in the management, economics and strategic planning of health
care organizations and delivery systems, and the legal, ethical and social policy issues in
health care. The specialization courses will be taught by Pace University faculty from
the Public Administration Department in Dyson College and the Lienhard School of
Nursing. M.B.A. core courses will be taught by faculty in the Lubin School of Business.

The Lubin School of Business, with 5,500 students, offers undergraduate, graduate
and doctoral degree programs, and hosts a number of research centers and institutes
which extend its scholarship and teaching to a worldwide audience. The School is
accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB).

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County.

Sportsman’s Series Reels in Country’s Leading Fishing Experts

Six of the country’s top professional anglers will share their expertise at
Pace University this spring, for B.A.S.S.* Fishing Techniques 1997. The
program, part of the University’s Sportsman Series, provides a unique opportunity
to “school” with the pros in a classroom setting.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — Do you know how to fish with a “gitzit?” What is the
best way to pause spinner bait? When is the best time of year for trolling?

Six of the country’s top professional anglers will share their expertise at
Pace University this spring, for B.A.S.S.* Fishing Techniques 1997. The
program, part of the University’s Sportsman Series, provides a unique opportunity
to “school” with the pros in a classroom setting.

Pace University’s Environmental Center has been sponsoring the Sportsman Series
for eight years, allowing fishing enthusiasts of all ages and skill levels to
learn about the best techniques for catching trophy fish. From February through
April, the Center offers two and a half hour evening seminars on topics ranging
from salt water and watershed reservoirs fishing, to jigging for bass and rowboat
fishing for trout. There is also a fly-casting clinic to demonstrate basic techniques
and principles of casting and line handling.

“Even though I’ve probably watched every fishing program there is on TV twice, I still
walk out of these seminars with new ideas,” said James Eyring, assistant director of
Pace’s Environmental Center, who has been fishing for 38 years. This program is one
of only a handful of university-based Sportsman’s Series in the country.

For part of the Series, the Center will host B.A.S.S.* Fishing Techniques 1997 on
April 12-13, drawing six of North America’s leading competitors to campus. They will
conduct 12 workshops during the weekend and lead an informal “think tank” session to
share their secret techniques, stories and anecdotes. This year’s instructors are
Kevin VanDam (Michigan), George Cochran (Arkansas), Jay Yelas (Texas), Kenyon Hill
(Oklahoma), Rich Tauber (California), and Mitch Paul (Maine).

For more information about the 1997 Sportsman Series, call (914) 773-3789. Advance
registration is required.

Pace University’s Environmental Center is an affiliate of the department of biological
sciences and specializes in equine science and nature studies. It offers both credit
and non-credit courses and workshops to the University and surrounding communities and
is committed to educating people about the importance of conservation and protecting
the environment.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and
Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate
degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business,
School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law
and Lienhard School of Nursing.

* The Bass Anglers Sportsman Society (B.A.S.S.) was founded more than 25 years ago as a
service organization. Its primary aim is to help anglers get the most out of bass
fishing — whether it’s by protecting the fishing environment, reporting on the newest
products and techniques, telling them about the latest “hot spots,” or providing an arena
for professional and amateur fishing competitions.

Dyson College Offers New Graduate Program in Environmental Science

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will offer a new master’s degree program in environmental science beginning this fall. The program, to be taught by faculty in the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physical sciences, is the only one of its kind in the New York Metropolitan area.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences will offer a new master’s degree program in environmental science beginning this fall. The program, to be taught by faculty in the departments of biological sciences, chemistry and physical sciences, is the only one of its kind in the New York Metropolitan area.

Scientific and technological advances of the 19th and 20th centuries have led to substantial economic growth and progress world wide. These changes, however, also have impacted the environment in significant and unexpected ways. “Pace’s interdisciplinary graduate program will help students acquire the knowledge and practical skills needed to tackle the environmental challenges of the 21st century,” said Dr. David Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the new program.

Students will learn about the growing challenges facing today’s global community, including the depletion of natural resources, disruption in the food chain, global climate changes, the decline of air, water and land quality, and the increase in toxic pollutants. Also, they will learn methods of monitoring, correcting and preventing such environmental problems.

This 39-credit master’s degree program has been approved and registered by the New York State Department of Education. Classes and research will take place in the Dyson Hall of Science, which is a modern facility with environmental instruments, an aquatic ecology laboratory, computers and state-of-the-art technology.

Students may have opportunities to participate in cooperative educational internships for field work experience. Degree candidates will have a broad, in-depth knowledge and appreciation of the field of environmental science as well as practical research skills.

Employment opportunities for graduates may include environmental research, testing, analysis, field assessment, and waste management for nonprofit foundations, corporations, federal and state research centers and universities. There also will be opportunities for management positions in federal, state and local environmental protection agencies and departments and of environmental conservation.

Students interested in applying for admission to the program should have completed the equivalent of two years of basic, undergraduate science courses. However, qualified students can enroll in the program and complete undergraduate prerequisite courses along with the graduate-level courses.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Environmental Law Open House February 11

The Pace University School of Law will host an open house for prospective students interested in the environmental law program on Tuesday, February 11, beginning at 10:00 a.m., at the White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway. The program will feature an address from Robert F. Kennedy Jr., LL.M., a professor of environmental law at the school. Professor Kennedy is the first graduate of the Pace master’s in Environmental Law.

CONTACT: Public Affairs
PHONE: (212) 346-1268

– Robert F. Kennedy Jr. to Speak –

WHITE PLAINS, NY — The Pace University School of Law will host an open house for prospective students interested in the environmental law program on Tuesday, February 11, beginning at 10:00 a.m., at the White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway. The program will feature an address from Robert F. Kennedy Jr., LL.M., a professor of environmental law at the school. Professor Kennedy is the first graduate of the Pace master’s in Environmental Law.

The open house will provide an overview of the various programs which Pace offers in the fields of environmental protection, energy conservation and natural resources. Information will be available about the specific areas of concentration which are offered and participants will have the chance to speak with students, faculty and counselors.

The Pace University School of Law has an environmental law review, several environmental law clinics and it hosts the Annual Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, the largest environmental moot in the country. Pace also maintains the nationally-recognized Global Environmental Law Network on the Law School’s Internet home page.

The School of Law is part of a comprehensive diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Its Environmental Law program has consistently been rated among the top programs in the country.

For more information or to register for this open house, please call (914) 422-4210, or visit the Pace University School of Law Internet home page at: (http://www.law.pace.edu).

Pace Receives $400,000 NEH Challenge Grant

Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences has received a $400,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The 4-to-1 matching grant will result in $2 million in endowment for the Dyson College Humanities Education Initiative to support faculty and curriculum development, and to enrich the College’s service-learning program.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences has received a $400,000 challenge grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). The 4-to-1 matching grant will result in $2 million in endowment for the Dyson College Humanities Education Initiative to support faculty and curriculum development, and to enrich the College’s service-learning program.

“The University community is proud to be the recipient of the only 1996 NEH Challenge Grant in New York State and is excited by the potential the Humanities Education Initiative represents in advancing liberal arts education at Pace,” said University President Dr. Patricia Ewers. Pace must raise $1.6 million in matching funds to receive the full $400,000 award from the NEH.

Funding will help implement changes to the University’s new core curriculum, and in the development of innovative capstone courses for humanities major programs. Other initiatives include team-teaching and interdisciplinary approaches to enhance faculty-student interaction. The funds also will support new personnel to assist faculty in developing new service-learning curricula for the humanities.

Nationwide, 26 NEH Challenge Grants were awarded in 1996, of which 10 went to institutions of higher education. The NEH Challenge Grant program is one of only two federal programs that awards endowment funds. Since its inception in 1977, the program has distributed $340 million in federal funds, which in turn has generated more than $1.15 billion in support for the nation’s libraries, colleges, museums and other humanities institutions.

This is Pace University’s second NEH Challenge Grant. The first was awarded in 1983 and resulted in nearly $1.3 million in endowment funds for the humanities. These funds continue to support a distinguished chair in philosophy, the Straus Thinking and Learning Center, and humanities faculty and curriculum development activities.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Chemistry Professor Receives Distinguished Scientist Award

David N. Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the graduate program in environmental science at Pace University, has been selected to receive the 1996 Distinguished Scientist Award of the Westchester Chemical Society.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, NY — David N. Rahni, professor of analytical chemistry and director of the graduate program in environmental science at Pace University, has been selected to receive the 1996 Distinguished Scientist Award of the Westchester Chemical Society.

The Westchester Chemical Society represents more than 850 chemists and is the charter section of the American Chemical Society.

Dr. Rahni was chosen for the award in recognition of his scholarly contributions to the fields of immobilized enzyme electroanalytical biosensors, nano-engineering, clinical and environmental science, and his promotion of sustainable development.

Dr. Rahni also holds adjunct professorships in the department of dermatology at the New York Medical College and in the LL.M. environmental law program at Pace University School of Law.

The American Chemical Society has named Dr. Rahni as general chair for its 31st Middle Atlantic Regional Meeting, to be held on the University’s Pleasantville campus in May. The event is expected to draw as many as 1,500 scientists for a series of presentations, exhibits and symposia.

In 1993-94, he was a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar at the Technical University of Denmark and a visiting professor at the University of Oxford in England. Dr. Rahni was awarded a visiting professorship to Denmark by the Royal Danish Research Academy in the summer of 1994. He has held visiting scientific positions with IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center and Ciba Additives Research Division and has lectured at the Universities of Rome, Florence and Mexico. He has also been a visiting United Nations Scholar in the Third World, presenting lectures and assisting in curriculum development.

He completed his B.Sc. in chemistry at the National University of Iran, his M.S. in chemistry at Eastern New Mexico University, and his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry at the University of New Orleans in 1985.

Dr. Rahni and his wife, Fay, live in Ossining, NY. They have three children.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.

Pace Law School Hosts National Environmental Moot Court Competition

Pace University School of Law’s Ninth Annual National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, the largest environmental moot in the country, will be held from Thursday, February 20 to Saturday, February 22 at the School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1268
WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. — Pace University School of Law’s Ninth Annual National Environmental Law Moot Court Competition, the largest environmental moot in the country, will be held from Thursday, February 20 to Saturday, February 22 at the School’s White Plains campus, 78 North Broadway.

Each two- or three-person team from more than 80 law schools nationwide, has written and filed a brief on retroactivity and commerce clause issues in a CERCLA liability proceeding. During the competition, each team will defend its position before a panel of judges comprised of attorneys and federal and state judges, most of whom are specialists in the field of environmental law.

The judges presiding over the final round include: Environmental Appeals Judge Honorable Edward E. Reich, who works with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Appeals Board; Honorable Eugene E. Siler Jr., a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Sixth Circuit in Cincinnati, Ohio; Honorable Jane R. Roth, a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Honorable Richard D. Cudahy, a United States Court of Appeals Judge for the Seventh Circuit in Chicago, Illinois.

Preliminary rounds are held on Thursday with the top-scoring 27 teams advancing to the quarter-final round. Nine teams will advance to the final round, which will be held on Saturday, February 22, and is free and open to the public.

Awards are given in the following categories: Winning Team; Best Oralist; Best Brief; Finalist Team; and Best Brief Representing Each Party. The team with the highest combined scores for both the oral argument and written brief will win the competition. The winning team receives a traveling trophy of an original watercolor, “Dawn-Storm King,” by Hudson Valley artist John Husley, which commemorates the 1965 court decision inaugurating the field of environmental law. Last year’s winning team was from The University of Houston.

This student-run competition is sponsored annually by the Pace Law School’s Environmental Moot Court Board in collaboration with the Environmental Law Institute in Washington, D.C., and Texaco Inc. In the past, law students have argued on environmental topics ranging from illegal dumping to personal liability for violation by a corporation. Winning briefs will be published in the Pace Environmental Law Review.

The School of Law is part of a comprehensive diversified University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Its Environmental Law program has consistently been rated among the top programs in the country.

Students View Multimedia Presentations as an Effective Teaching Tool

Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
NEW YORK — Teachers who are looking for new, effective ways to reach students should consider going high-tech in the classroom. It seems the “MTV generation” prefers multimedia presentations over traditional chalkboard instructions, a new Pace University survey shows.

Nearly 82 percent of the students surveyed felt that multimedia presentations increased their interest in the material and improved student-teacher interaction, said Psychology Professor Richard Velayo, who conducted the survey. Nearly 64 percent of the students felt that the multimedia format increased their understanding of the subject and helped them organize and take notes.

“Using multimedia presentations is an attempt to engage the students,” said Dr. Velayo, who incorporates computer-generated demonstrations with his lectures and class discussions. Dr. Velayo added that it is important to get students to actively interact with the material presented so they have a sense of control over their learning. He uses a laptop computer, CD-ROM, large-screen televisions, sound, pictures and, occasionally, films and videos to enhance his lectures.

Dr. Velayo surveyed 83 undergraduate and graduate students in his psychology courses on the use of multimedia technology in the classroom. A majority of the students say the computerized presentations enhance the lectures, but a few say it is more difficult to take notes and understand the material.

“Most students like this technology given its novelty,” Dr. Velayo said. “But if they perceive the material to be more interesting as well as promoting increased interaction, it will have a positive affect on their learning.” However, Dr. Velayo warned, this medium can be detrimental if students become passive observers in the process, as if watching television. The educational and social implications of this study’s findings certainly must be explored further, Dr. Velayo said.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law and Lienhard School of Nursing.