NEWS RELEASE: The Pacific Century – Pace Announces Global Asia Studies Major

NEWS RELEASE: The Pacific Century – Pace Announces Global Asia Studies Major

The Pacific Century – Pace University Announces Global Asia Studies Major

NEW YORK – The 21st century is described as the Pacific Century – a century dominated, especially economically, by the rise of modern Asia-Pacific countries such as China, Japan, South Korea, India and Taiwan.  In recognition of this eastward turn, this fall the Department of History on Pace University’s New York City campus launched a new major – Global Asia Studies, a program designed for the study of Asian cultures, languages, histories and economies. The new program will focus on the development of bilingual specialists and the development of experts in comparative Asian cultures.

“In today’s global economy, the competitive advantage favors those who have foreign language skills and knowledge of international cultures in addition to their own.  The breadth and depth of the Global Asia Studies program will equip graduates with both,” Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Dean Nira Herrmann said.

Global Asia Studies is multidisciplinary and includes faculty from disciplines such as history, modern languages, literature, economics, and communication studies.  “Our program is unique among Asian studies because it focuses on the interconnectedness of Asian cultures and their links to the rest of the world,” said Ronald K. Frank, program co-director.

The program offers two tracks: The Asian Languages and Cultures track and the Comparative Asian Studies track. The Asian Languages and Cultures track is geared toward students who wish to become bilingual specialists.  The Comparative Asian Studies is tailored to students who wish to pursue professional careers in government, multinational institutions or academic careers. Curricular activities may be enriched with local internships and travel abroad opportunities.

Students majoring in Global Asia Studies will find numerous job opportunities in multinational corporations, international law, government, medicine, science, higher education, and cultural institutions.

“Pace University has always been an innovator, and this exciting new program reflects Dyson College’s commitment to grow and evolve with the world around it,” said Global Asia Studies co-director Joseph T. Lee.

To learn more about the program, call Ronald K. Frank or Joseph T. Lee. Dr. Frank can be reached at (212) 346-1463 or by email at rfrank2@pace.edu. Dr. Lee can be reached at (212) 346-1827 or by email at jlee@pace.edu. Visit the website at http://www.pace.edu/dyson/academic-departments-and-programs/history/ba-in-global-asia-studies.

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional sciences (including pre-medicine and pre-law), as well as many courses that fulfil core curriculum requirements. The college offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace University has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. Visit www.pace.edu.

Contact: Cara Cea, 914-906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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