Professional Mariner: “After blackouts, cruise lines say they will install more backup power”

. . . Standard emergency systems normally are designed to ensure enough power to accomplish lifesaving activities only, said Andrew Coggins, a former chief engineer who is a cruise industry researcher at Pace University.

. . . Standard emergency systems normally are designed to ensure enough power to accomplish lifesaving activities only, said Andrew Coggins, a former chief engineer who is a cruise industry researcher at Pace University.

“The emergency diesel generator is going to lower the lifeboats or supply power to the fire pump or to the pumps to prevent flooding … and the emergency lighting and the communication system on the ship to send an SOS,” Coggins said. “It’s not going to supply power to the galley, main lighting, air conditioning or ventilation.”

Modern-day consumers, however, are less tolerant of inconveniences than they used to be. “If there is a fire and you lose propulsion, the passengers still expect to have food and still expect the toilets to work,” Coggins said.

Read the article in Professional Mariner.

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