BabyCenter blog: “Shouting at kids, especially teens, gets the wrong results”

“When parents yell and scream at their children, or at others with whom they interact, their child gets the message that this is appropriate behavior,” Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, professor of psychology at Pace University. “In turn these children may interact similarly with their peers, parents, teachers, and coaches.”

. . . Lots of psychologists are weighing in on this topic, as did Dr. Jennifer A. Powell-Lunder, professor of psychology at Pace University and co-author of “Teenage As a Second Language: A Parent’s Guide to Becoming Bilingual.”

Children learn by watching their parents, Powell-Lunder reminds us:

“When parents yell and scream at their children, or at others with whom they interact, their child gets the message that this is appropriate behavior. In turn these children may interact similarly with their peers, parents, teachers, and coaches.”

A better alternative, in an ideal world, is to stay supportive and calm:

“The best approach to encouraging positive behaviors in children and teens is twofold. First, parents need to practice what they preach. Secondly, parents need to create a structured and supportive environment for their kids. Such an environment includes clear rules, consequences and of course reinforcement through praise and continued encouragement.”

Read more on the BabyCenter blog

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