The Journal News, The Huffington Post, MidHudson News Network, WPAP: Pace experts speak to media about Boston explosions

The Journal News, The Huffington Post, MidHudson News Network, WPAP: Pace experts speak to media about Boston explosions

Pace has provided expert sources to news media as the public tries to make sense of the tragedy in Boston.

Joe Ryan was interviewed by The Journal News, Mid-Hudson News Network and WPAP, a Clearchannel radio station in Florida.

From The Journal News: “Joseph Ryan, a former New York Police Department officer who is now chairman of the homeland security graduate program at Pace University, said people can’t just rely on police to spot something. “The only way we can fight back is we all have to get involved,” he told The Journal News. “Constant vigilance in a free society is a necessary task that we all must undertake.”

Richard Shadick was interviewed by The Portland Press Herald in Portland, Maine. “Richard Shadick, director of the counseling center at New York’s Pace University, said there are similarities to 9/11 in the public’s feelings of uncertainty. “I think there is a sense of dismay now, too, though, that this doesn’t just happen in New York or Washington,” he said. Shadick said proximity plays a role in people’s feelings, too. People in Maine are likely to be affected differently than people in, say, Idaho. “But I do think these events become a permanent part of our collective consciousness,” he said.

Anthony Mancini was interviewed by the Huffington Post. “Letting children verbalize their concerns can help blunt the impact of their feelings, said Anthony Mancini, a Pace University psychology professor who focuses on grief and trauma. “Children do have the capacity to bounce back, and experiencing something horrific like the Boston Marathon … is not a sentence of trauma by any stretch at all,” he said. “Most children will do fine in the way that most adults would do fine.” While children who witnessed the explosion first-hand could face some degree of post-traumatic stress disorder, Mancini said, children are often resilient and bounce back.”

 

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