Computerworld: “Reports: Apple slashes iPhone component orders”

. . . “Given the recent numbers of the Galaxy S III, Samsung is a serious competitor, so I’m not surprised that some of the initial hype over the iPhone 5 has dissipated,” said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “The Galaxy is a trendy phone for young people, and I see lots of students buying these.”

. . . “Given the recent numbers of the Galaxy S III, Samsung is a serious competitor, so I’m not surprised that some of the initial hype over the iPhone 5 has dissipated,” said Darren Hayes, an assistant professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “The Galaxy is a trendy phone for young people, and I see lots of students buying these.”

Today, Samsung announced that it had sold 40 million Galaxy S III smartphones since the device’s May 2012 launch, and more than 100 million Galaxy S-series handsets since 2010.

Hayes also ticked off some of the familiar knocks against Apple’s business model, ranging from its intransigence over high carrier subsidies and the Maps debacle to its habit of upgrading the iPhone annually, saying that those decisions have come home to roost.

“This may be a long-term issue for Apple,” argued Hayes. “Apple hasn’t changed the iPhone as dramatically as we’re used to seeing, but instead [has] made only small changes to its functionality.”

As an example, Hayes cited Near Field Communications (NFC), a technology that Apple has yet to apply to the iPhone, while Samsung has made much of it in advertising campaigns, showing users transferring data simply by touching their phones together.

Read the article by Computerworld.

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