MEDIA ADVISORY: 9/11 impact on Chinese New Yorkers to be addressed at Pace University symposium Thursday September 22

This symposium will present descriptions and reflections on 9-11 by six well-informed Chinese New Yorkers. Three are professors– an attorney, a historian and a psychologist from CUNY, Pace, and Adelphi universities. Also speaking will be the mother of an early rescue worker, a former K-9 policeman, and a New York City Housing Authority employee and Chinatown activist.

September 20, 2011

MEDIA ADVISORY

9/11 impact on Chinese New Yorkers to be addressed at Pace University symposium Thursday September 22

WHO and WHAT: Manhattan’s Chinatown is less than ten blocks from Ground Zero but the substantial impact of the attack on that community, and Chinese elsewhere in the city, has not been extensively covered. This symposium will present descriptions and reflections on 9-11 by six well-informed Chinese New Yorkers. Three are professors– an attorney, a historian and a psychologist from CUNY, Pace, and Adelphi universities. Also speaking will be the mother of an early rescue worker, a former K-9 policeman, and a New York City Housing Authority employee and Chinatown activist. The event is co-sponsored by the Confucius Institute at Pace University and the Asian American/Asian Research Institute at CUNY.

WHEN and WHERE: Panel discussion 6:30 PM Thursday September 22, in the Student Union of Pace’s downtown New York City campus, east of City Hall, Panel title: “Peace & Harmony: Reflections from Chinese New Yorkers on the 10th Anniversary of 9/11.” Preceded by events beginning at 4 pm. Free and open to the public. Media admission by press card.

Panelists: Joyce Moy is Professor of Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship at the City University of New York (CUNY) and Executive Director of CUNY’s Asian American/Asian Research Institute. An attorney, she has extensive experience developing programs that support immigrant, women, and minority business owners throughout New York City. She was the first Asian-American in New York State to head a Small Business Development Center. She was director of the center, at LaGuardia Community College, from 2001-2004, which opened right after the attacks of 9/11 and provides counseling to businesses and educational seminars on entrepreneurship.

Jean Lau Chin is professor and Dean of the Derner Institute for Advanced Psychological Studies at Adelphi University in New York. She is distinguished as an educator, administrator, clinician, and scholar with over 40 years of experience. She was the first Asian American Psychologist to be licensed in Massachusetts. Dr. Chin has published extensively in the areas of diversity, leadership, clinical training, Asian American and women’s issues, and mental health. She has been designated a Fulbright Specialist on the topic of women and leadership. She is the author of the memoir “Learning From My Mother’s Voice: Family Legend And The Chinese American Experience” (2005).

Joseph Tse-Hei Lee is professor of history and co-director of the East Asian studies program at Pace University. He specializes in the history of modern China and East Asia and has written on the history of Sino-Western cultural relations. He is the co-editor of “Marginalization in China: Recasting Minority Politics: (New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2009) and the author of “The Bible and the Gun: Christianity in South China, 1860-1900” (New York: Routledge 2003; Chinese edition, Beijing: Social Sciences Academic Press, 2010).

Jiao Xian Cen (岑娇娴) immigrated to the United States in 1988 from the city of Guangzhou, China where she was an elementary school teacher. She worked in a garment factory in Midtown Manhattan between 1988 and the spring of 2011 while learning basic family nursing care, which helped her to become a volunteer worker in a nursing home in 2003. Zhe Zack Zen (曾喆), Ms. Cen’s youngest son, graduated from the University of Rochester with a B.A. in Electronic Engineering and an M.B.A in Finance, where he learned C.P.R. and later completed Emergency Medical Training. When the first plane hit the North Tower on the morning of September 11th 2001, he was walking to his office at the Bank of New York. He rushed to become one of the first rescuers to arrive at the scene and paid the ultimate price. His final moments were caught by a Fox TV News camera, revealing his heroic and selfless acts.

David Waymond Lim (林維敏) was born in Manhattan’s Chinatown. His family opened a restaurant in Far Rockaway, NY, a decade after immigrating to the United States from Toison, China. Lim became a Port Authority Police Officer in 1980. His training in structural fire-fighting, crime prevention and elevator evacuation gave him the necessary skill sets to be posted at the World Trade Center. He was assigned to the K-9 Unit in 1997. Stationed at 2 World Trade Center, he was among the first police officers who responded to the 911 call at 1 World Trade Center on September 11, 2011. Sadly, his K-9 partner Sirius perished when the South Tower collapsed. After the September 11 disaster, he was stationed at Port Newark where he trained another dog, Sprig, for duty, who worked with Lim until 2005 when he retired due to Mr. Lim’s promotion to Sergeant. Lim is currently working as a Police Lieutenant at La Guardia Airport.

Paul J.Q. Lee (李澤光) was born and raised in Chinatown, Manhattan and has lived there for most of his life. Mr. Lee attended Lake Forest College in Chicago graduating with a BA in History. He worked as a salesman for the Equitable Life Assurance Company before assisting his father to run the family business, Quong Yuen Shing & Co. a store on Mott Street in Chinatown, in the 1980s. Opened in 1891, the store was the oldest continually operated general store in Chinatown, but suffered great financial losses post-9-11 and partially due to the drastic reduction in tourism and the security-related closing of Park Row had to be closed in 2003. He is currently an employee of the New York City Housing Authority, and is an activist in Chinatown and the adjacent areas.

Moderator, Weihua Niu (牛卫华)is an Associate Professor in Psychology and Director of the Confucius Institute at Pace University. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Beijing Normal University and Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Yale University. On the Pace faculty since 2003, her research interests include creativity, educational testing, cross-cultural psychology, and comparative education. She has authored more than 30 academic papers in these areas. Her passion is to help strengthen understanding between American and Chinese cultures through doing research and serving the community.

OTHER EVENT COMPONENTS: Earlier, the event includes: 4-5 pm, exhibition of contemporary Chinese painting and calligraphy on the themes of memorializing 9/11 and the harmony, happiness, peace, and tranquility of the mid-autumn Chinese Moon festival. Chinese folk music by Chinese Theatre Works. At 5 pm, talk on “Moon and Rice: A Tribute to 9/11 using Chinese Cultural Symbolism” by artist Chee Wong Ng, whose “Red, White, and Blue” installation is on display in the campus library. 5:30, reception and brief remarks by Pace officials and local dignitaries.

Media contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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