NEWS ADVISORY: WikiLeaks debacle — Revolutionary changes may hit how GIs email home

Darren Hayes, a leading expert in the field of computer forensics and security and a professor at Pace, is available to comment on the WikiLeaks debacle and U.S. computer security policy.

Within the hacker community, the WikiLeaks situation is “in some ways a cyber war,” Professor Hayes told TechNewsWorld.

Within the hacker community, the WikiLeaks situation is “in some ways a cyber war,” Professor Hayes told TechNewsWorld.

December 7, 2010

NEWS SOURCE

 

Topic: WikiLeaks debacle

Revolutionary changes may hit how GIs email home

Darren Hayes, a leading expert in the field of computer forensics and security and a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York, is available to comment on the WikiLeaks debacle and U.S. computer security policy.

“The WikiLeaks debacle will force the Department of Defense to rethink computer security procedures and change their policies in a revolutionary way. They have for a long time debated whether the use of USB drives and access to social media should be allowed by military personnel.

“Many have argued that it is important for members of the military stationed abroad to have access to technology that facilitates communication with family. There have however been numerous problems with secrets being leaked through social media or compromises with USB devices well before WikiLeaks.

“Technology improvements in tracking wanted criminals must be made to capture suspects like Julian Assange, who was able to successfully cover his digital trail before surrendering.”

Phone:  212-346-1005 (office) or 516-270-6532 (cell); email dhayes@pace.edu

BACKGROUND:  Professor Hayes has special sensitivities to security: he began a 10-year career in the financial services industry in 1990 with Cantor Fitzgerald at the World Trade Center. At Pace he manages the computer forensics laboratory, conducting research with computer science and information systems students. Much of this research has been published through Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). A training consultant in Computer Forensics, he has cultivated partnerships in security areas with agencies including the United Nations, the New York City Police Department and the city departments of Education and Parks and Recreation. He has been quoted by CNN.com, FoxNews.com, and Nextgov.com.

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

 # # #

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *