Expert in Homeland Security Available for Comment

This fall Pace University will launch an executive Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals under the University and Agency Partnership Initiative (UAPI) created by the federal Center for Homeland Defense and Security, a part of the US Navy’s Postgraduate Center. Information about the program is at www.pace.edu/homelandsecurity.

Pace Criminal Justice and Security Chair Joseph Ryan Available for Comment on Homeland Security

EXPERT IN HOMELAND SECURITY AVAILABLE FOR COMMENT
– Director of Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, May 5, 2010 – In an article in the New York Times, “Times Square Bomb Suspect Waives Rapid Court Hearing,” New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is reported to be making a case that New York needs a larger share of federal homeland security money.

Joseph Ryan, Ph.D., chair of criminal justice and security at Pace, agrees.

This fall Pace University will launch an executive Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security Professionals under the University and Agency Partnership Initiative (UAPI) created by the federal Center for Homeland Defense and Security, a part of the US Navy’s Postgraduate Center. Information about the program is at www.pace.edu/homelandsecurity.

“The public’s concern regarding terrorism appears to depend on physical and temporal proximity to incidents,” said Ryan, director of the new master’s program. “The level of public interest is best characterized as episodic and ephemeral. Terrorism, homeland security, and weapons of mass destruction had not achieved top status for the American public before September 11, 2001.”

Ryan, a retired New York City police detective, is an expert in violent crimes and community policing as a tool in the war on terrorism. He has chaired a NYPD advisory group for the U.S. Department of Justice that developed security strategies for the 1996 summer Olympics and testified on risk management before the Congressional sub-committee on National Security, Emerging Threats and International Relations.

“The attacks on 9/11 changed how Americans viewed their vulnerability to terrorism,” said Ryan. “Fear and confusion were dominant themes surrounding the attacks and arguably representatives of the government were unable to respond efficiently.”

“The upheaval after 9/11 produced predictable reactions, many of which represented personal and political opinions rather than measured conclusions based on data,” said Ryan. “Missing from these was an ‘educated’ response on how our government can respond to future incidents more efficiently using existing activities.”

“It is the goal of Pace University’s Executive Masters in Management for Public Safety and Homeland Security to provide a educational forum to develop an ‘all hazards’ approach to future catastrophic events and the ‘general defense and the welfare’ of Americans,” said Ryan. “The program will help answer two questions: First, how can we prevent future attacks? Second, if there is another major event, how do we ensure that we are prepared to respond with existing resources?”

Areas of expertise: community policing, violent crime, domestic violence, security strategy, homeland security, risk management, police training, criminal justice and curriculum innovations in teaching criminal justice and security programs.

To reach Ryan:

Phone: 914 773-3814 or 212 346-1839

E-mail: jryan@pace.edu

Media Contact:

Cara Cea, (914) 906-9680, ccea@pace.edu

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