News source: Cyber-threats posed by China

Although GoDaddy and Google cited China as a source of cyber attacks, they didn’t blame the government. But these firms are taking action to limit their dealings with China because of other government policies concerning privacy and censorship, which also have concerned the U.S. military. Will censorship and possible cyber attacks prompt other companies to limit their business in China?

Robert Vambery, a professor of international business and marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, said this kind of behavior by the Chinese has been going on for a while and it’s naive not to expect it. While he sees the possibility of action by Google and other firms having some short- to intermediate-term impacts on other businesses’ dealings with China, they won’t be major, he said.

Contact: Bill Caldwell, Pace University, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

March 29, 2010

NEWS SOURCE

Topic: Cyber-threats posed by China

Although GoDaddy and Google cited China as a source of cyber attacks, they didn’t blame the government. But these firms are taking action to limit their dealings with China because of other government policies concerning privacy and censorship, which also have concerned the U.S. military. Will censorship and possible cyber attacks prompt other companies to limit their business in China?

Robert Vambery, a professor of international business and marketing at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, said this kind of behavior by the Chinese has been going on for a while and it’s naive not to expect it. While he sees the possibility of action by Google and other firms having some short- to intermediate-term impacts on other businesses’ dealings with China, they won’t be major, he said.

“Unless there is some serious military encounter between China and the United States, then this is not likely to change significantly in the near future,” Vambery recently told Computerworld.

(http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9174242/Military_warns_of_increasingly_active_cyber_threat_from_China_ )

Vambery is available to comment on the impacts of the Google decisions in China on other U.S. based corporations and on U.S. national security. Phone: 201-886-2902 or 212-618-6572; email rvambery@pace.edu.

For nearly ten years Vambery served as Managing Editor and Editor at Large of the Journal of International Business Studies, the refereed journal of the Academy of International Business. His research interests include China-US Trade Relations, Japan-US Trade Relations, Global Competition at the Industry Level, and International Financial Crises.

He has been part of a joint project with KPMG Peat Marwick and the Global Economic Action Committee that lead to the development of a training program for East European university graduates. He worked with the Kwan Fong Institute of Hong Kong on the subject of “Trading and Investing in Hong Kong and the People’s Republic of China.” In conjunction with the Global Economic Action Committee, he researched “Modernization of the Chinese Economy and its Role in the Global Economy.”

Vambery was educated at Columbia University and received his PhD and M.Phil. degrees from its Graduate School of Business and Graduate Faculties, and his MS degree from its School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

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