Academy for Applied Environmental Studies Appoints Science Journalist Andrew Revkin Senior Fellow

Contact: Chris Cory, Pace Public Information, 212-346-1117, 212-979-8463, ccory@pace.edu

Andrew Revkin, eminent science journalist, to become Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University

Appointment to new Academy for Applied Environmental Studies builds on University’s environmental leadership

New York, NY, December 14, 2009 – Andrew C. Revkin, one of the United States’ most eminent science reporters, is becoming Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University’s new interdisciplinary Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies.

Revkin will be leaving The New York Times when he returns from his current assignment covering the Copenhagen summit on climate change, and will begin teaching when the spring term begins in late January.

“We are extremely pleased that Andy Revkin is joining what we believe is one of the strongest university environmental programs in the nation,” said Geoffrey Bracket Brackett, DPhil (Oxon.), the University’s Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs. “His intellectual expertise and ethical balance will make enormous contributions to helping the Pace Academy in its aim to be a global resource for policy development.”

The Pace Academy is a University-wide center with internationally known faculty members who concentrate on national and global environmental issues such as the water crisis and climate change.

Pace awarded Revkin an honorary doctorate in 2007.

Green expertise. Over the years Pace has become well known for environmental education. The Pace Law School’s environmental program is consistently ranked among the top three in the US. The law school’s Environmental Legal Clinic, co led by Professors Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and Karl Coplan, trains environmental lawyers who, while still students, have set national precedents in a number of cases involving the Hudson River. This fall Pace Law launched the first curriculum in the nation entirely dedicated to climate change, offered within the school’s Masters of Environmental Law (LLM) program.

Revkin will be joining a host of nationally-known environmentalists who are part of the Pace faculty and the Academy, Brackett said.

They include John Cronin, the Academy’s Senior Fellow for Environmental Policy, who first came to public attention as the Hudson Riverkeeper and now also directs the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries; Nicholas Robinson, University Professor for the Environment, one of the founders of international environmental law; Professor Robert Chapman, an environmental philosopher who directs the undergraduate Environmental Studies program and the Pace Institute for Environmental and Regional Studies; and Richard Schlesinger, an environmental toxicologist who oversees the Environmental Science BS and MS programs. Pace’s science curriculum is especially strong in issues underlying environmental assessment, policy, and communication.

In the last decade Pace University spearheaded formation of the Environmental Consortium of Hudson Valley Colleges and Universities, an organization of more than 50 campuses in the Hudson watershed that collaborates on environmental studies and teaching.

Copenhagen presence. In Copenhagen, the Pace presence includes the former US Congressman and dean emeritus of Pace Law School, Richard Ottinger, a delegate for the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, one of the largest global environmental nongovernmental organizations, who is blogging about the global climate change negotiations. Two Pace Law School Doctor of Juridical Science students are delegates, from the Marshall Islands and Pakistan, and a student in the school’s joint master’s program with the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies is serving as an observer.

Revkin published one of the first journalistic reports on global warming 21 years ago. His degree citation said “One of his specialties is revealing how slowly-building risks such as global warming and the loss of species could transform the planet, but in ways hard to perceive in the rush of daily experience.”

The citation added: “He has melded scientific information with coverage of the politics that influence both damage and prevention.” His first book, on the slain leader of a movement to protect the Amazon basin, was the basis of an HBO film, which won three Golden Globes and two Emmy awards. An amateur musician who performs on fiddle, guitar, mandolin and vocals in a country folk-blues band, his New York Times profile of a heavy-metal singer was the basis for the 2001 movie “Rock Star.”

Sustainability and population. Now, Revkin has said, he wants to think and write about “the role of journalism in the larger world of environmental communication – how information matters in terms of policy and behavior.” He is starting what will be his third book for adults, about the interlinked issues of sustainability and population, and finishing the second of two books for children on environmental issues. The first has the ironic title “The North Pole Was Here.”

A full description of Revkin’s journalistic career was published today by the Columbia Journalism Review.

For 103 years Pace University has produced thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu.

Visit Pace on the web: Pace.edu | Facebook – Pace University News | Twitter @PaceUNews| Flickr | YouTube. Follow Pace students on Twitter: NYC | PLV

Twitter Digg Delicious Stumbleupon Technorati Facebook Email

No comments yet... Be the first to leave a reply!

Leave a Reply


× 9 = fifty four