Black History Month Exhibit at Pace Features Photos and Artifacts from Horace Greeley’s Life

An exhibit highlighting the words and career of the man who founded the New York Tribune, fought for the abolition of slavery, and unsuccessfully ran for President against Ulysses S. Grant in 1872 opens Friday, February 3 in the library on Pace University’s Pleasantville, NY campus.

Contact
Cara Halstead Cea, Pace University
914-773-3312, cell 914-906-9680, chalstead@pace.edu

EVER-RELEVANT HORACE GREELEY
TO BE ON EXHIBIT AT PACE UNIVERSITY FOR BLACK HISTORY MONTH

War and peace, “idlers and imbeciles.”

PLEASANTVILLE, NY, January 27, 2006 – The crusading newspaper publisher and politician Horace Greeley had a lot more to say than the phrase he’s most famous for, “Go West, young man.” For instance:

• “There never was a good war or a bad peace.”
• “A Constitutional denial to Black men … of Political Rights freely secured to White men is monstrously unjust and irrational.”
• “Most of us would fain be thought richer than we are. Thousands incur expenses that they are scarcely able to meet through fear of being thought stingy or penniless, when they might better confess their poverty and save their money.”

An exhibit highlighting the words and career of the man who founded the New York Tribune, fought for the abolition of slavery, and unsuccessfully ran for President against Ulysses S. Grant in 1872 opens Friday, February 3 in the library on Pace University’s Pleasantville, NY campus.

The exhibit is open to the public during regular library hours, 8:30 AM to 2 AM Monday through Friday, 9 AM to 7 PM on Saturday, and 10 AM to 2 AM on Sunday. The Mortola Library is reached through Entrance #2 at 861 Bedford Road.

Part of the University’s commemoration of Black History Month and its centennial, much of the display is expected to move to Pace’s downtown Manhattan campus in the spring.

The ladder Greeley mounted to prune trees at his country house in Chappaqua will be on display, along with campaign buttons, early photographs, political cartoons and a deathbed scene.

Opportunity. Pace has at least three coincidental connections to Greeley. The University’s motto is “Opportunitas,” Latin for opportunity, which Greeley often encouraged people to seize. The main building of the Pace campus in downtown Manhattan is on the site of Greeley’s Tribune building, and the university’s Pleasantville campus grew up on the site of the sanatorium where Greeley died.

The exhibit was researched and designed by co-curators Marilyn E. Weigold, PhD, professor of history and the Pace University historian, and Brian Jennings, a Pace instructional services librarian. Many items in the exhibit were loaned by the New Castle Historical Society, which is located in the Chappaqua home that Greeley once owned.

“Do not lounge in the city!” The exhibit includes the epigrams above and other still-relevant Greeleyisms on civic competency, voluntarism, business education, environmentalism, abolitionism, and advancing the cause of women.

In a famous speech praising hard, shrewd work, Greeley predicted that “any young man who, at the close of his first year of responsible, independent life, has saved something, and knows where to find it, will go on to competence; whereas, the young man who at the close of his first year has made nothing, and has saved nothing – I do not say in money, but who has made himself no better off – will almost certainly die a poor man….”

And oh yes. Greeley’s full exhortation about the west, in 1841, was: “Do not lounge in the cities! There is room and health in the country, away from the crowds of idlers and imbeciles. Go west, before you are fitted for no life but that of the factory.”

Celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2006, Pace is a private university in the New York Metropolitan area with a growing national reputation for offering students opportunity, teaching and learning based on research, civic involvement, international perspectives and measurable outcomes. It is one of the ten founders of Project Pericles, developing education that encourages lifelong participation in democratic processes. Pace has campuses including downtown and midtown New York City, Pleasantville, Briarcliff, White Plains (a graduate center and law school), and a Hudson Valley Center at Stewart International Airport near Newburgh, N.Y. The University enrolls over 14,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lienhard School of Nursing, Lubin School of Business, Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, and Pace Law School. www.pace.edu.

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