New Study Shows Green, Black and White Teas Adversely Affect Bacterial Virus Infection

According to a new study conducted at Pace University, green, black and white teas have an adverse effect on the bacterial virus T1, which infects Escherichia coli B. The research also indicates that the anti-viral effects of oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash are enhanced by the addition of tea extracts.

NEW STUDY SHOWS GREEN, BLACK AND WHITE TEAS ADVERSELY AFFECT BACTERIAL VIRUS INFECTION
Results Indicate Anti-Viral Effects of Toothpaste and Mouthwash are Enhanced By Addition of Tea Extract

New York, NY – May 20, 2002 – According to a new study conducted at Pace University, green, black and white teas have an adverse effect on the bacterial virus T1, which infects Escherichia coli B. The research also indicates that the anti-viral effects of oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash are enhanced by the addition of tea extracts.

“Our study shows that tea has a very potent anti-viral effect on bacteriophage viability,” says Milton Schiffenbauer, Ph.D., a microbiologist and professor in the Department of Biology at Pace University’s Dyson College of Arts & Sciences and primary author of the research. “We found that the addition of polyphenol extract (a tea compound with antioxidant properties) to oral agents such as toothpaste and mouthwash significantly reduces bacterial virus infection. In some cases, total inactivation of the virus responsible for infecting Escherichia coli was achieved.”

All teas contain polyphenols or antioxidants that protect human cells from reactive atoms (free radicals) that are responsible for body tissue damage. Flavorids are a group of polyphenols that occur naturally in tea. It is suspected that the concentration level of these polyphenols in the body is responsible for the beneficial properties of tea. Polyphenols may also contribute to the prevention of various types of cancer, including pancreas, colon, bladder, prostate and breast cancer.

Several findings are of particular interest:

· The anti-viral effect of green tea (Templer loose tea) is much more substantial than the anti-viral effects of either black or white teas.

· Results using Eden organic green teas (Bancha, Genmaicha, Hojicha and Kukicha) indicate that green tea extract from tea bags is more effective than loose tea, filtered or unfiltered.

· Caffeinated green and black teas are more effective as anti-viral agents than decaffeinated green and black teas.

· Teas and polyphenol extract may have applications in the inactivation of human pathogenic viruses.

The results of this study will be presented at the 102nd General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology in Salt Lake City, Utah, May 19-23.

Dr. Schiffenbauer can be reached at (212) 346-1968 or mschiffenbauer@pace.edu .

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County, and a Hudson Valley Center located at Stewart Airport in New Windsor. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, Lienhard School of Nursing and Pace Law School. (www.pace.edu)

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