Pace University School of Education to Host Forum on School Reform with Author Jonathan Kozol, May 13

Pace University’s School of Education will host a forum on school reform featuring author Jonathan Kozol on Saturday, May 13, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Pace Downtown Theater, 3 Spruce Street, in lower Manhattan. The event is free and open to the public. Registration begins at 9 a.m.

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1696
NEW YORK – Pace University’s School of Education will host a forum on school reform featuring author Jonathan Kozol on Saturday, May 13, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Pace Downtown Theater, 3 Spruce Street, in lower Manhattan. The event is free and open to the public. Registration begins at 9 a.m.

Jonathan Kozol, who graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University and was awarded a Rhodes scholarship to Oxford, is the author of Amazing Grace and Savage Inequalities. In the sixties, Kozol moved from Harvard Square into a poor black neighborhood of Boston and became a fourth grade teacher in the city’s public schools. He has devoted the subsequent decades to issues of education and social justice in America.

Jonathan Kozol who is widely noted as the “most eloquent spokesman for America’s disenfranchised,” has not relented in his criticism of the shameful inequalities of public education. “New York City spends $64,000 yearly to incarcerate a man on Rikers Island but only $5,000 yearly for the education of a child in a typical third grade in the South Bronx. Meanwhile, a white child in a very wealthy suburb in nearby Long Island will be getting up to $20,000 spent on her each year.”

His newest book, Ordinary Resurrections: Children in the Years of Hope, is written from the vantage point of a group of children in the South Bronx, whom he’s known for many years, and who, with “joyful energy, delicious humor, and unshaken faith in their self-worth, defy the morbid expectations of society.” As Kozol points out, “No matter what we do to cheat and hide and injure [children] they light their little lights and stand there at these awful walls that we have built and tell us that the beautiful illumination of their souls is not so readily eclipsed.” Kozol believes that children speak most eloquently for themselves, and this book is a tribute to their voices.

Ordinary Resurrections is set on a block in the South Bronx framed by an underfunded public school, led by a strong Hispanic principal, at one end and a church, led by a priest of rare political courage, on the other end. Besides the children, the teachers of P.S. 30 are also heroes. “Their calling when it’s filled with merriment and beauty, makes me think of joyful priests in Sunday robes when they prepare to give communion. Teaching children of this age, when it’s done right, is more than craft; it’s also partly ministry and partly poetry.”

Since 1996, the Pace University School of Education has provided innovative education programs at the undergraduate, graduate and continuing professional development levels. “The School firmly believes that educators can, and must, make a difference to children and adolescents in schools and in the communities where they live and work,” said Dr. Janet McDonald, dean. The School of Education has been recognized at the national level for the development of a unique professional development school model. This model involves substantial partnerships with elementary and secondary school in low-income areas. The School’s Center for Urban Education, Center for Literacy and Center on Economic Education provide direct service to over one thousand preschool though 12th grade school children enrolled in community-based partnership programs.

The education forum on school reform, sponsored in collaboration with Phi Delta Kappa, is free and open to the public. Advanced reservations are suggested. For more information call: Felice Nudelman at (212) 346-1118 or email: education@pace.edu. Additional information and online registration is also available on the School of Education home page at: http://www.pace.edu/education.

Pace is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City and Westchester County. Nearly 13,500 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business, School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

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