Pace University’s School of Education Receives $220,000 Grant to Train Student-Teachers to Work in Urban Schools

Pace University’s School of Education has been
awarded a three-year, $220,000 grant to create a Professional Development
School (PDS) in the Bronx. Called Project CUE, this collaborative program
will pair Pace faculty with local school teachers to prepare future educators
to work in urban schools.

Posted by Public Affairs on November 04, 1998 at 15:12:56:

Contact: Public Affairs
(212) 346-1637
PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – Pace University’s School of Education has been
awarded a three-year, $220,000 grant to create a Professional Development
School (PDS) in the Bronx. Called Project CUE, this collaborative program
will pair Pace faculty with local school teachers to prepare future educators
to work in urban schools.

The grant was awarded to the School of Education by the Fund for Improvement
of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE). Part of the U.S. Department of Education
in Washington, D.C., FIPSE awards grants for small, innovative programs in
higher education that serve as models for other U.S. colleges and universities.
This is the fifth FIPSE grant for Pace’s School of Education.

“A serious issue facing education in this country is the preparation of new
teachers for positions in urban schools,” said Rita Silverman, a professor of
education at Pace University. Pace has several successful Professional Development
Schools in Westchester, but this will be its first urban PDS.

“Urban teaching positions are often filled by uncertified teachers while many newly
certified teachers from the suburbs are taking jobs as teaching assistants. Project
CUE students who serve a three-year apprenticeship in District 10 in the Bronx as
part of their undergraduate education should be prepared to work both willingly and
successfully in urban schools,” Silverman said.

Silverman and Pace Professor Carole Rhodes are the co-principal investigators of Project
CUE. Pace Professor Ann Spindel will coordinate the on-site activities.

The grant is designed to prepare Pace students to handle the special challenges of
urban schools. “What better way to do this than to place apprentice teachers at the
same school for three years, supported by mentor teachers?” Silverman said.
Working together, District 10 teachers and Pace faculty will co-teach courses for the
students.

The first year of the project will include planning and identifying District 10 teachers
who will participate in Project CUE. Project staff will collaborate with District 10 teachers
to design the PDS, plan seminars, and prepare Pace students for an urban experience.
During the fall 1999 semester, Pace students will be placed in District 10 and will return
to the same school and teachers for the next three years, as apprentices in Project CUE.

Pace University is a comprehensive, independent University with campuses in New York City
and Westchester County. Nearly 14,000 students are enrolled in undergraduate, graduate and
professional degree programs in the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, Lubin School of Business,
School of Computer Science and Information Systems, School of Education, School of Law, Lienhard
School of Nursing and the World Trade Institute.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *