New York Times: “Across Generations, Gathering Insights – A Review of ‘4000 Miles,’ at Pace University”

Alice Cannon as Vera and Jacob Perkins as Leo in the Hudson Stage Company’s production of “4000 Miles” at Woodward Hall Theater at Pace University.

Alice Cannon as Vera and Jacob Perkins as Leo in the Hudson Stage Company’s production of “4000 Miles” at Woodward Hall Theater at Pace University.

Read the New York Times Theater Review.

 

Business Insider: “The CIA Hemorrhages Spies To Top Wall Street Firms”

. . . “There are trillions of dollars of illegal currency in constant circulation. Improved enforcement on transactions is a must, and regulators are pressing for more and better training of professionals in the financial institution sector,” said John James, executive director at the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University in New York.

. . . “There are trillions of dollars of illegal currency in constant circulation. Improved enforcement on transactions is a must, and regulators are pressing for more and better training of professionals in the financial institution sector,” said John James, executive director at the Center for Global Governance, Reporting and Regulation at Pace University in New York.

Read the story by Business Insider.

TheStreet: “Snark-Nado: What Happened With JP Morgan’s Epic Twitter Fail”

. . . “This was a highly unusual move by JP Morgan, given the nature of recent news stories about the company and the large fines being levied on the bank,” says Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York. “Companies like JP Morgan are careful about who can ask questions during earnings calls and at other events, so I am surprised that they planned this open dialog and Q&A session.”

. . . “This was a highly unusual move by JP Morgan, given the nature of recent news stories about the company and the large fines being levied on the bank,” says Darren Hayes, a professor at Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems in New York. “Companies like JP Morgan are careful about who can ask questions during earnings calls and at other events, so I am surprised that they planned this open dialog and Q&A session.”

Read the story on TheStreet.

NEWS RELEASE: Pace Joins with Other Science Coalition Universities, Columbia and NYU, to Honor Lowey

Pace joined with fellow Science Coalition universities Columbia and NYU to honor Congresswoman Nita Lowey for her role in supporting issues related to global health and biomedical research, consistently advocating for robust federal support for targeted research initiatives. (Left: Dr. Jonathan H. Hill, Associate Dean, Pace University, Sean Solomon, Director of Lamont-Doherty, Congresswoma Nit Lowey and Dr. Kurt Becker, Associate Provost for Research, New York University.)

The Science Coalition presented Congresswoman Nita Lowey with its Champion of Science Award in recognition of her strong commitment to funding the basic research that keeps the United States and the state of New York at the forefront of scientific and medical discovery and technological innovation. The award was presented jointly by officials from three Science Coalition universities, Columbia, NYU, and Pace, at an event at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York.

“I would like to thank Congresswoman Lowey for her leadership and ongoing support in Congress, in particular in the area of higher education research funding, she is a true Champion of Science,” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “Without her voice it would be a challenge for Pace students, who represent the great middle class of American education and the aspiring heart of America, to assume leadership roles that are essential to creating jobs, stimulating the economy and keeping America competitive.”

Read the full press release here.

Associated Press: “Beyond Twitter: The next wave of tech IPOs brews”

. . . Many of the companies that are producing revenue rely on advertising, a dependence that worries Larry Chiagouris, marketing professor Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

. . . Many of the companies that are producing revenue rely on advertising, a dependence that worries Larry Chiagouris, marketing professor Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York.

“If you fast-forward beyond the next 24 months, people will realize that these companies just aren’t going to make a lot of money,” he says. “Advertisers are not putting a large portion of their budgets into these companies.”

Chiagouris thinks the stampede to invest in Twitter and other money-losing startups is heading in the same direction as the dot-com bubble of the late 1990s when a horde of unprofitable Internet companies were ushered on to Wall Street.

“People are chasing the dream of profits as opposed to any evidence of profits,” Chiagouris says. “And it’s a hope, it’s a wish, it’s a dream, but that’s all it is right now.”

Read the story by the Associated Press.

AgingToday: Forging Intergenational Connection and Friendship

Many older adults, even some older professionals who work in the aging services industry, struggle to make sense of our technology-infused world—a landscape constantly reinventing itself. But there are innovators who are trying to make technology more age-friendly: they can be found at the intersection of design, aging and technology, in places like the Gerontechnology Program at Pace University, New York, N.Y.

Jean Coppola, one of the program’s founders and professor in the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Services, began offering an intergenerational computing course in 2006.

Read the full article by Kate Finn in AgingToday.

CNN: “Jimmy Kimmel Sketch Sparks Massive Protests”

Watch an interview featuring Chunyan Li, an accounting professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business who attended rallies in New York.

Watch an interview featuring Chunyan Li, an accounting professor at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business who attended rallies in New York.

NEWS RELEASE: Political Science Professor Matthew Bolton Presented Statement on Disarmament to UN General Assembly

Political science professor, Matthew Bolton, PhD, addressed the United Nations General Assembly First Committee, on behalf of international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working on disarmament, peace building and humanitarian issues.

On behalf of global civil society organizations, political science professor calls for disarmament and arms control “driven by the needs and rights of people most affected by armed violence.”

New York – A Pace University New York City political science professor, Matthew Bolton, PhD, addressed the United Nations General Assembly First Committee, on behalf of international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working on disarmament, peace building and humanitarian issues.

“We call for an approach to disarmament that is driven by the needs and rights of people most affected by armed violence, not by the discretion of states and organizations most responsible for it,” said Bolton to representatives of the 193 UN member states, as well as UN agencies and NGOs. The First Committee has responsibility for disarmament and international security.

The NGO statement, endorsed by 11 organizations, congratulated states on “some noteworthy progress” in recent international discussions on the elimination of nuclear weapons, the recent Security Council resolution on small arms and light weapons as well as the Arms Trade Treaty, signed by over 100 states since June.

Members of the Pace University community played an important role in the Arms Trade Treaty negotiations in July 2012 and March 2013. Bolton was an advisor to Control Arms, the civil society coalition advocating for a “bulletproof treaty” and numerous students interned or worked with the campaign.

Despite these developments in global policy-making on controlling weapons, however, Bolton asserted that “now is not the time for resting on laurels.” The NGO statement identified numerous concerns, including the abuse of the consensus rule in disarmament forums, exclusion of meaningful civil society participation, lack of equal opportunities for women in decision-making and the marginalization of the voices of victims and survivors of armed violence.

“Creativity and new human-centered approaches must be a requirement for all states advocating nuclear disarmament, conventional arms control and reduced military expenditure,” said Bolton, reading the NGO statement. “We can and must replace stalemate and watered-down outcomes with alternatives that advance human security and social and economic justice.”

In addition to teaching classes on international politics, Bolton also leads Pace University’s New York Model United Nations program. Last weekend – 25-27 October – 25 Pace students participated in the National Model United Nations conference in Washington DC, representing Argentina, Denmark and Kenya in simulations of the First Committee and other UN decision-making bodies.

Pace was recognized by the conference with four awards, for students’ excellent diplomatic skills, public speaking abilities and political savvy. Given their success, Bolton asked his students for their advice on how to deliver his statement at the actual United Nations. “They were happy to oblige,” said Bolton.

Bolton is an expert on global disarmament policy. He is author of Foreign Aid and Landmine Clearance: Governance, Politics and Security in Afghanistan, Bosnia and Sudan (I.B. Tauris, 2010) and a forthcoming travelogue Political Minefields (I.B. Tauris, 2014). He has written widely on the politics of landmines, cluster munitions, the Arms Trade Treaty and fully autonomous military robotics (“killer robots”). His recent lecture on the politics of landmines and military robotics is available on the Pace University’s iTunes U account.

Located only two express subway stops from the iconic United Nations complex on the East River, Pace University’s scholars actively engage with global policymaking debates. This June, Pace hosted an expert symposium on Robotic Weapons Control, and the university has partnered with the UN Commission on the Status of Women to create workshops on global policies that affect women and girls.

Pace University has a 60-year history of excellence in regional, national and international Model United Nations conferences and encourages its students to develop the skills and capacities needed to thrive as global citizens. Drawing students from around the world, Pace has numerous academic programs related to international affairs, including political science, peace and justice studies, global Asia studies, international management, Latin American studies, modern languages and cultures, women’s and gender studies and environmental studies.

Contact:

Matthew Bolton, PhD
Assistant Professor of Political Science
Dyson College of Arts and Sciences
Pace University
1 Pace Plaza
New York, NY 10038

+1 (212) 346 1828

mbolton@pace.edu
http://politicalminefields.com
@politicalmines

NEWS ADVISORY: Pace University to Host Annual Meeting of American Physical Society, Saturday, November 16

Pace University’s School of Education will host the 109th Annual Meeting of the New York State Section of the American Physical Society on Saturday, November 16 on the Pleasantville campus.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Pace University to Host Annual Meeting of American Physical Society, Saturday, November 16

Pleasantville, NY — Nov. 12, 2013  – Pace University’s School of Education will host the 109th Annual Meeting of the New York State Section of the American Physical Society on Saturday, November 16 on the Pleasantville campus in Lienhard Lecture Hall from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The theme of the event is “Physics in Nature.”

This one day conference will explore how physics can be applied to the study of nature and biology. Students will have the opportunity to attend and present a poster—on any topic—for the chance to win a cash award.

Topics to be discussed by distinguished experts and guests include:

•           Ocean Physics

•           Biophysics of Small Organisms

•           Physics of Living Systems

•           Teaching Physics to Adolescents

•           The State of Physics Education in New York State

To register, visit http://www.nyssaps.org/index.html   

About Pace University

Since 1906 Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in New York City and Westchester County, New York, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. www.pace.edu

Media contact:  Bill Caldwell, Pace, 212-346-1597, wcaldwell@pace.edu

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NEWS RELEASE: President Friedman & Congresswoman Lowey Host Higher Education Roundtable

Pace University President Friedman & Congresswoman Lowey

Host Higher Education Roundtable Discussion

WHITE PLAINS, NY – Senior Administrators from area Westchester colleges and universities convened on Friday, November 8th to take part in a roundtable discussion co-hosted by Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland).  Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman led the discussion at Pace Law School in White Plains which focused on President Obama’s College Affordability Plan introduced in August as well as other areas of interest to higher education administrators such as Federal Financial Aid stability and The College Scorecard. (President Obama’s proposal)

“I was so pleased to hear directly from experts in our region’s higher education community. Their feedback and perspective is invaluable,” said Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-Westchester/Rockland). “I look forward to continuing to work closely with our higher education leaders to ensure that a quality, affordable college education remains in reach for Lower Hudson Valley families.”

“I want to thank Congresswoman Lowey for taking a leadership role on this important issue.  More than fifty-percent of our student body receives some form of federal financial aid and institutional aid remains one of our largest expenses. ” said Pace University President Stephen J. Friedman. “Making sure that college remains accessible and affordable for everyone is something of paramount importance to all of us in this room.”

Attendees at the round-table included financial aid and admissions administrators from Long Island University, Westchester Community College, St. Thomas Aquinas College, Manhattanville College, Rockland Community College, Nyack College, SUNY Purchase, Mercy College and Dominican College.

“The intentions behind the President’s proposal are good,” said Robina Schepp, Vice President for Enrollment Management at Pace University. “It is in the implementation and the execution that the challenges arise. One of the unintended consequences might be a loosening of the requirements for graduation. This is the opposite of what the President intends. The Score Card that was rushed out was incomplete. Better information exists. Placements and earnings power information on graduates still is not there.”

Congresswoman Lowey and President Friedman plan to submit comments and concerns from the group at large to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan at a meeting in Washington DC to be scheduled soon.